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  1. Tara H. Abraham (2012). Transcending Disciplines: Scientific Styles in Studies of the Brain in Mid-Twentieth Century America. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):552-568.
  2. Tara H. Abraham (2006). Cybernetics and Theoretical Approaches in 20th Century Brain and Behavior Sciences. Biological Theory 1 (4):418-422.
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  3. Tara H. Abraham (2004). Nicolas Rashevsky's Mathematical Biophysics. Journal of the History of Biology 37 (2):333 - 385.
    This paper explores the work of Nicolas Rashevsky, a Russian émigré theoretical physicist who developed a program in "mathematical biophysics" at the University of Chicago during the 1930s. Stressing the complexity of many biological phenomena, Rashevsky argued that the methods of theoretical physics -- namely mathematics -- were needed to "simplify" complex biological processes such as cell division and nerve conduction. A maverick of sorts, Rashevsky was a conspicuous figure in the biological community during the 1930s and early 1940s: he (...)
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  4. Tara H. Abraham (2003). From Theory to Data: Representing Neurons in the 1940s. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (3):415-426.
    Recent literature on the role of pictorial representation in the life sciences has focused on the relationship between detailed representations of empirical data and more abstract, formal representations of theory. The standard argument is that in both a historical and epistemic sense, this relationship is a directional one: beginning with raw, unmediated images and moving towards diagrams that are more interpreted and more theoretically rich. Using the neural network diagrams of Warren McCulloch and Walter Pitts as a case study, I (...)
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