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Profile: Tea Logar
  1. Tea Logar (2013). Rawls's Rejection of Preinstitutional Desert. Acta Analytica 28 (4):483-494.
    For many, the idea that people should be rewarded in proportion to what they deserve is the very essence of distributive justice. However, while the notion of moral desert is otherwise widely accepted, Rawls rejects it entirely in his A Theory of Justice. Many authors have argued that Rawls’s claims about desert have serious and unappealing consequences for his conception of justice as fairness, and also that they deny the possibility of autonomous choice to the very agents whose decisions are (...)
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  2. Tea Logar (2010). “Diagnostic Hedonism” and the Role of Incommensurability in Plato's Protagoras. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):241-257.
    The dispute over Socrates’ apparent endorsement of hedonism in the Protagoras has persisted for ages among scholars and students of Plato’s work. The solution to the query concerning the seriousness and sincerity of Socrates’ argument from hedonism established in the dialogue is of considerable importance for the interpretation of Plato’s overall moral theory, considering how blatantly irreconcilable the defense of this doctrine is with Plato’s other early dialogues. In his earlier works, Socrates puts supreme importance on virtue and perfection of (...)
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  3. Tea Logar (2010). Exploitation as Wrongful Use: Beyond Taking Advantage of Vulnerabilities. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 25 (3):329-346.
    The notion that exploitation consists in taking wrongful advantage of another’s vulnerability is widespread in the philosophical literature. Considering the popularity of this view, it is disappointing to find that very few authors attempt to provide substantive accounts of characteristics they consider relevant vulnerabilities (i.e., those pertinent to exploitation), as well as of relevant features which make taking advantage of those vulnerabilities wrongful. In this paper, I analyze the few approaches (notably those presented by Ruth Sample and Robert Goodin) that (...)
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  4. Tea Logar (2005). Moral Obligations and Practical Identities. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (14):359-372.
    A discussion of Christine Korsgaard's The Sources of Normativity.
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  5. Tea Logar (2005). Respect, Pluralism, and Justice. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):605-608.
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  6. Tea Logar (2005). Thomas E. Hill, Jr., Respect, Pluralism, and Justice. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 15:605-608.
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