Search results for 'Technological innovations Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Zhouying Jin (2011). Global Technological Change: From Hard Technology to Soft Technology. Intellect.
    This updated second edition of Global Technological Change reconsiders how we make and use technology in the twenty-first century.
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  2. M. J. Mulkay (1972). The Social Process of Innovation: A Study in the Sociology of Science. London,Macmillan.
  3. Ralf Dahrendorf (ed.) (1977). Scientific-Technological Revolution: Social Aspects. Sage Publications [for] the International Sociological Association.
     
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  4. Michael St Clair (2011). So Much, so Fast, so Little Time: Coming to Terms with Rapid Change and its Consequences. Praeger.
    Introduction and acknowledgments -- What is happening to us? and why? -- So much information is changing how we think -- Communication, entertainment, and over-stimulation -- Work : how it changes and how it changes us -- New behaviors and changes in manners -- Faster and faster time -- Families, women, and sex -- Making sense of contradictory social trends -- Conclusion.
     
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  5. Edward Tenner (2003). Our Own Devices: The Past and Future of Body Technology. Alfred A. Knopf.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface ix -- Chapter One: Technology, Technique, and the Body 3 --Chapter Two: The First Technology: Bottle-Feeding 30 --Chapter Three: Slow Motion: Zori 51 --Chapter Four: Double Time: Athletic Shoes 75 --Chapter Five: Sitting Up Straight: Posture Chairs 104 --Chapter Six: Laid Back: Reclining Chairs 134 --Chapter Seven: Mechanical Arts: Musical Keyboards 161 --Chapter Eight: Letter Perfect?: Text Keyboards 187 --Chapter Nine: Second Sight: Eyeglasses 213 --Chapter Ten: Hardheaded Logic: Helmets 238 --Epilogue: Thumbs Up 263 -- (...)
     
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  6. Changshu Chen (2012). Ji Shu Zhe Xue Yin Lun =. Ke Xue Chu Ban She.
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  7. Huub Dijstelbloem (2008). Politiek Vernieuwen: Op Zoek Naar Publiek in de Technologische Samenleving. Van Gennep.
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  8. John Hart (1997). Ethics and Technology: Innovation and Transformation in Community Contexts. Pilgrim Press.
     
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  9. William E. Herfel (1999). On Social and Material Aspects of Technological Control. Science and Education 8 (1):55-62.
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  10. Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Mads Rosendahl Thomsen & Jacob Wamberg (eds.) (2012). The Posthuman Condition: Ethics, Aesthetics and Politics of Biotechnological Challenges. Aarhus University Press ;.
     
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  11. Jorge Ocampo Ledesma (2007). Paradigmas Tecnológicos, Sujetos Tecnológicos. Ciestaam.
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  12.  17
    Diana Senechal (2011). Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture. R&L Education.
    Machine generated contents note: Chapter 1 Acknowledgments -- Chapter 2 Introduction: The Chatter of the Present -- Chapter 3 Definitions of Solitude -- Chapter 4 Distraction: The Flip Side of Engagement -- Chapter 5 Antigone: Literature as "Thinking Apart" -- Chapter 6 The Workshop Model in New York City -- Chapter 7 The Folly of the "Big Idea" -- Chapter 8 The Cult of Success -- Chapter 9 Mass Personalization and the "Underground Man" -- Chapter 10 The Need for Loneliness (...)
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  13.  6
    Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate (...)
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  14.  2
    Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate (...)
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  15. Robert Daglish (ed.) (1972). The Scientific and Technological Revolution: Social Effects and Prospects. Moscow,Progress Publishers.
  16. Philip W. Hemily & M. N. Őzdas (eds.) (1979). Technological Challenges for Social Change. Oxford University Press.
     
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  17.  2
    M. R. N. Bruijnis, V. Blok, E. N. Stassen & H. G. J. Gremmen (2015). Moral “Lock-In” in Responsible Innovation: The Ethical and Social Aspects of Killing Day-Old Chicks and Its Alternatives. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):939-960.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that will help in understanding and evaluating, along social and ethical lines, the issue of killing day-old male chicks and two alternative directions of responsible innovations to solve this issue. The following research questions are addressed: Why is the killing of day-old chicks morally problematic? Are the proposed alternatives morally sound? To what extent do the alternatives lead to responsible innovation? The conceptual framework demonstrates clearly that (...)
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  18.  7
    Michael H. Shapiro (2005). The Identity of Identity: Moral and Legal Aspects of Technological Self-Transformation. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):308-373.
    Technologies are being developed for significantly altering the traits of existing persons (or fetuses or embryos) and of future persons via germ line modification. The availability of such technologies may affect our philosophical, legal, and everyday understandings of several important concepts, including that of personal identity. I consider whether the idea of personal identity requires reconstruction, revision or abandonment in the face of such possibilities of technological intervention into the nature and form of an individual's attributes. This requires an (...)
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  19.  1
    Hugh Lacey (2014). Scientific Research, Technological Innovation and the Agenda of Social Justice, Democratic Participation and Sustainability. Scientiae Studia 12 (SPE):37-55.
    Modern science, whose methodologies give special privilege to using decontextualizing strategies and downplay the role of context-sensitive strategies, have been extraordinarily successful in producing knowledge whose applications have transformed the shape of the lifeworld. Nevertheless, I argue that how the mainstream of the modern scientific tradition interprets the nature and objectives of science is incoherent; and that today there are two competing interpretations of scientific activities that are coherent and that maintain continuity with the success of the tradition: "commercially-oriented technoscience" (...)
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  20.  5
    Peter Kroes (forthcoming). Experiments on Socio-Technical Systems: The Problem of Control. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-13.
    My aim is to question whether the introduction of new technologies in society may be considered to be genuine experiments. I will argue that they are not, at least not in the sense in which the notion of experiment is being used in the natural and social sciences. If the introduction of a new technology in society is interpreted as an experiment, then we are dealing with a notion of experiment that differs in an important respect from the notion (...)
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  21.  3
    Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2002). Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Technological innovations and social developments have led to dramatic changes in the practice of medicine and in the way that scientists conduct medical research. Change has brought beneficial consequences, yet these gains have come at a cost, for many modern medical practices raise troubling ethical questions: Should life be sustained mechanically when the brain's functions have ceased? Should potential parents be permitted to manipulate the genetic characteristics of their embryos? Should society ration medical care to control costs? (...)
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  22. Ellen Frankel Paul, Jnr Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2002). Bioethics: Volume 19, Part 2. Cambridge University Press.
    Technological innovations and social developments have led to dramatic changes in the practice of medicine and in the way that scientists conduct medical research. Change has brought beneficial consequences, yet these gains have come at a cost, for many modern medical practices raise troubling ethical questions: Should life be sustained mechanically when the brain's functions have ceased? Should potential parents be permitted to manipulate the genetic characteristics of their embryos? Should society ration medical care to control costs? (...)
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  23.  2
    John M. Roberts (1971). Expressive Aspects of Technological Development'. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (2):207-220.
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  24.  35
    Michael Lynch (1993). Scientific Practice and Ordinary Action: Ethnomethodology and Social Studies of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science have grown interested in the daily practices of scientists. Recent studies have drawn linkages between scientific innovations and more ordinary procedures, craft skills, and sources of sponsorship. These studies dispute the idea that science is the application of a unified method or the outgrowth of a progressive history of ideas. This book critically reviews arguments and empirical studies in two areas of sociology that have played a significant role in the 'sociological turn' in (...)
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  25. David G. Lygre (1979). Life Manipulation: From Test-Tube Babies to Aging. Walker.
     
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  26. Soraya Nour & Olivier Remaud (eds.) (2010). War and Peace: The Role of Science and Art. Duncker & Humblot.
    Violence -- Poliltical philosophy -- Critical theory -- Science and arts in international relations -- Psyche -- Aesthetics -- Tolstoi's War and peace.
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  27.  10
    Andrew Stark (2006). The Limits of Medicine. Cambridge University Press.
    What are the final limits of medicine? What should we not try to cure medically, even if we had the necessary financial resources and technology? This book philosophically addresses these questions by examining two mirror-image debates in tandem. Members of certain groups, who are deemed by traditional standards to have a medical condition, such as deafness, obesity, or anorexia, argue that they have created their own cultures and ways of life. Curing their conditions would be a form of genocide. Members (...)
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  28.  1
    David Tabachnick & Toivo Koivukoski (eds.) (2004). Globalization, Technology, and Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    Confronts globalization and technology from philosophical perspectives.
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  29.  14
    Toni Weller (ed.) (2012). History in the Digital Age. Routledge.
    Including international contributors from a variety of disciplines - History, English, Information Studies and Archivists – this book does not seek either to applaud or condemn digital technologies, but takes a more conceptual view of how ...
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  30. Thomas R. DeGregori (2001). Agriculture and Modern Technology: A Defense. Iowa State University Press.
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  31.  12
    Robert E. Denton (ed.) (2000). Political Communication Ethics: An Oxymoron? Praeger.
  32. John Frederic Kilner, C. Christopher Hook & Diane B. Uustal (eds.) (2002). Cutting-Edge Bioethics: A Christian Exploration of Technologies and Trends. W.B. Eerdmans.
     
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  33. Changqiu Liu (2005). Ji Yin Ji Shu Fa Yan Jiu. Fa Lü Chu Ban She.
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  34. Fernando Lolas (ed.) (2006). Ética E Innovación Tecnológica. Centro Interdisciplinario de Estudios En Bioética (Cieb), Vicerrectoría de Investigación y Desarrollo, Universidad de Chile.
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  35. Zhengmao Ni (2005). Sheng Ming Fa Xue Tan Xi. Fa Lü Chu Ban She.
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  36. Tʻae-sik Yi (2007). Konghak Pŏpche Wa Yulli. Pagyŏngsa.
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  37.  74
    Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring (2008). Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques. NanoEthics 2 (3):241-249.
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology (...)
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  38.  24
    Mary Tiles (1995). Living in a Technological Culture: Human Tools and Human Values. Routledge.
    Holding the promise of both emancipation and oppression, technology at once terrifies and disturbs the social order. Its dazzles, seduces, yet it also unsettles and raises the specter of the loss of human values and our replacement by machines and silicon. In Living with Technology , Hans Oberdiek and Mary Tiles explore the cultural and philosophical tensions shrouding technology and its place in society. Examing the relationship between instrumental reason and technology, fact and value, efficient and responsibility, Oberdiek and (...)
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  39.  4
    Li Che-Hou (1974). The Objective and the Social Aspects of Beauty: Comments on the Aesthetics of Chu Kuang-Ch'ien and Ts'ai I. Contemporary Chinese Thought 6 (2):54-68.
    After reading the essays of Mr. Ts'ai and Mr. Chu, I have a few immature opinions. Generally speaking, I feel that in dealing with the errors of their opponents, both Ts'ai I in his criticism of Huang Yüeh-mien and Chu Kuang-ch'ien in his criticism of Ts'ai I are quite accurate and convincing. However, in presenting their own arguments of what is right, both of them are on shaky ground and in error. That is because in one way or another, consciously (...)
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  40. A. M. Kovalev & V. I. Kovalenko (1972). On the Question of the Interrelations Between Scientific-Technological and Social Revolution. Russian Studies in Philosophy 10 (4):383-394.
    The fundamental question in the Marxist theory of revolution is that of the socioeconomic and class content of a revolution. Under today's conditions this question takes on primary significance and is central to the ideological struggle. Compelled to recognize the role of revolution in the development of society, bourgeois sociologists strive, however, to give the concept of revolution a new content, eliminating its class essence. Inasmuch as the revolution in science and technology now in progress is significantly changing the face (...)
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  41.  9
    Sarah Kuhn (1998). When Worlds Collide: Engineering Students Encounter Social Aspects of Production. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (4):457-472.
    To design effective and socially sensitive systems, engineers must be able to integrate a technology-based approach to engineering problems with concerns for social impact and the context of use. The conventional approach to engineering education is largely technology-based, and even when additional courses with a social orientation are added, engineering graduates are often not well prepared to design user- and context-sensitive systems. Using data from interviews with three engineering students who had significant exposure to a socially-oriented perspective on (...)
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  42.  13
    Wolfgang Hofkirchner (2010). How to Design the Infosphere: The Fourth Revolution, the Management of the Life Cycle of Information, and Information Ethics as a Macroethics. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (1-2):177-192.
    The paper reconstructs the read thread that links the information revolution, the information concept and information ethics in Floridi’s philosophy of information. In doing so, it acknowledges the grand attempt but doubts whether this attempt is up to the state of affairs concerning the actual point human history has reached. It contends that the information age is rather conceivable as a critical stage in which human evolution as a whole is at stake. The mastering of this crisis depends on an (...)
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  43.  70
    Philip Brey (2008). The Technological Construction of Social Power. Social Epistemology 22 (1):71 – 95.
    This essay presents a theory of the role of technology in the distribution and exercise of social power. The paper studies how technical artefacts and systems are used to construct, maintain or strengthen power relations between agents, whether individuals or groups, and how their introduction and use in society differentially empowers and disempowers agents. The theory is developed in three steps. First, a definition of power is proposed, based on a careful discussion of opposing definitions of power, and it (...)
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  44.  54
    Yoni van Den Eede (2011). In Between Us: On the Transparency and Opacity of Technological Mediation. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 16 (2):139-159.
    In recent years several approaches—philosophical, sociological, psychological—have been developed to come to grips with our profoundly technologically mediated world. However, notwithstanding the vast merit of each, they illuminate only certain aspects of technological mediation. This paper is a preliminary attempt at a philosophical reflection on technological mediation as such—deploying the concepts of ‘transparency’ and ‘opacity’ as heuristic instruments. Hence, we locate a ‘theory of transparency’ within several theoretical frameworks—respectively classic phenomenology, media theory, Actor Network Theory, postphenomenology, several (...)
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  45.  9
    Dušanka Krajnović (2012). Ethical and Social Aspects on Rare Diseases. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (4):32-48.
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  46.  2
    Margaret Alston (2004). Who is Down on the Farm? Social Aspects of Australian Agriculture in the 21st Century. Agriculture and Human Values 21 (1):37-46.
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  47.  30
    Michael Gibbons (ed.) (1994). The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage Publications.
    As we approach the end of the twentieth century, the ways in which knowledge--scientific, social, and cultural--is produced are undergoing fundamental changes. In The New Production of Knowledge, a distinguished group of authors analyze these changes as marking the transition from established institutions, disciplines, practices, and policies to a new mode of knowledge production. Identifying such elements as reflexivity, transdisciplinarity, and heterogeneity within this new mode, the authors consider their impact and interplay with the role of knowledge in (...) relations. While the knowledge produced by research and development in science and technology is accorded central focus, the authors also outline the changing dimensions of social scientific and humanities knowledge and the relations between the production of knowledge and its dissemination through education. Placing science policy and scientific knowledge within the broader context of contemporary society, this book will be essential reading for all those concerned with the changing nature of knowledge, with the social study of science, with educational systems, and with the correlation between research and development and social, economic, and technological development. "Thought-provoking in its identification of issues that are global in scope; for policy makers in higher education, government, or the commercial sector." --Choice "By their insightful identification of the recent social transformation of knowledge production, the authors have been able to assert new imperatives for policy institutions. The lessons of the book are deep." --Alexis Jacquemin, Universite Catholique de Louvain and Advisor, Foreign Studies Unit, European Commission "Should we celebrate the emergence of a 'post-academic' mode of postmodern knowledge production of the post-industrial society of the 21st Century? Or should we turn away from it with increasing fear and loathing as we also uncover its contradictions. A generation of enthusiasts and/or critics will be indebted to the team of authors for exposing so forcefully the intimate connections between all the cognitive, educational, organizational, and commercial changes that are together revolutionizing the sciences, the technologies, and the humanities. This book will surely spark off a vigorous and fruitful debate about the meaning and purpose of knowledge in our culture." --Professor John Ziman, (Wendy, Janey at Ltd. is going to provide affiliation. Contact if you don't hear from her.) "Jointly authored by a team of distinguished scholars spanning a number of disciplines, The New Production of Knowledge maps the changes in the mode of knowledge production and the global impact of such transformations. . . . The authors succeed . . . at sketching out, in very large strokes, the emerging trends in knowledge production and their implications for future society. The macro focus of the book is a welcome change from the micro obsession of most sociologists of science, who have pretty much deconstructed institutions and even scientific knowledge out of existence." --Contemporary Sociology "This book is a timely contribution to current discussion on the breakdown of and need to renegotiate the social contract between science and society that Vannevar Bush and likeminded architects of science policy constructed immediately after World War II. It goes far beyond the usual scattering of fragmentary insights into changing institutional landscapes, cognitive structures, or quality control mechanisms of present day science, and their linkages with society at large. Tapping a wide variety of sources, the authors provide a coherent picture of important new characteristics that, taken altogether, fundamentally challenge our traditional notions of what academic research is all about. This well-founded analysis of the social redistribution of knowledge and its associated power patterns helps articulate what otherwise tends to remain an--albeit widespread--intuition. Unless they adapt to the new situation, universities in the future will find the centers of gravity of knowledge production moving even further beyond their ken. Knowledge of the social and cognitive dynamics of science in research is much needed as a basis of science and technology policymaking. The New Production of Knowledge does a lot to fill this gap. Another unique feature is its discussion of the humanities, which are usually left out in works coming out of the social studies of science." --Aant Elzinga, University od Goteborg. (shrink)
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  48.  6
    Rachelle D. Hollander (2002). Social Genomics: Genomic Inventions in Society. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):485-496.
    This paper identifies several kinds of intellectual mistakes that proponents of genetic engineering make, in defending their views and characterizing the views of their opponents. Results from research in the social sciences and humanities illuminate the nature of these mistakes. The mistakes themselves play a role in allowing proponents to gather support from other protagonists in the social controversies involving science and technology. Understanding the controversies requires understanding that innovations are components of complex and ill-structured social (...)
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  49.  4
    Jessica Smith Rolston, Skylar Huzyk Zilliox, Corinne Packard, Carl Mitcham & Brian Zaharatos (2014). Nanoethics and Policy Education: A Case Study of Social Science Coursework and Student Engagement with Emerging Technologies. NanoEthics 8 (3):217-225.
    The article analyzes the integration of a module on nanotechnology, ethics, and policy into a required second-year social science course at a technological university. It investigates not simply the effectiveness of student learning about the technical aspects of nanotechnology but about how issues explored in an interdisciplinary social science course might influence student opinions about the potential of nanotechnology to benefit the developing world. The authors find a correlation between student opinions about the risks and benefits (...)
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  50.  5
    Mrill Ingram (2002). Producing the Natural Fiber Naturally: Technological Change and the US Organic Cotton Industry. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 19 (4):325-336.
    Organic cotton productionboomed in the early 1990s only to fall steeplymid-decade. Production is currently rising, butslowly, and has yet to reach previous levels.This is in marked contrast to the steady growthin organic food production during the 1990s.Why, when other areas of organic productionexperienced steady growth, did organic cottonexperience a boom and bust? A study of thecotton production and processing industryreveals a long and heavily industrializedproduction chain that has presented numerouschallenges to growers and processors trying tointroduce an organic product. In addition, (...)
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