Search results for 'Technology Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Melvin Kranzberg (ed.) (1980). Ethics in an Age of Pervasive Technology. Westview Press.
     
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  2. William A. Blanpied & Wendy Weisman-Dermer (eds.) (1975). Proceedings of the Aaas Interdisciplinary Workshop on the Interrelationships Between Science and Technology, and Ethics and Values, Sheraton Conference Center, Reston, Virginia, 10-12 April 1975. [REVIEW] American Association for the Advancement of Science.
     
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  3. Hans Buchholz, Wolfgang Gmelin, John McHale & Paul Dubach (eds.) (1979). Science and Technology and the Future: Proceedings and Joint Report of World Future Studies Conference and Dse Preconference, Held in Berlin (West), 4.-10. May 1979: [Dedicated to the Memory of John Mchale, Paul Dubach]. [REVIEW] Saur.
     
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  4. George Bugliarello (ed.) (1977). Science, Technology, and Modern Society: Inaugural Symposium and Lectures Following the Inauguration of George Bugliarello as First President of the Polytechnic Institute of New York, March 13-14, 1975. [REVIEW] Polytechnic Press.
     
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  5. Bidart Campos & Germán José (eds.) (1987). Ethics, Law, Science, Technology, and International Cooperation: Córdoba, Argentina, 27/29 March 1984. Council of Advanced International Studies.
  6. Maurice Goldsmith & Alexander King (eds.) (1979). Issues of Development: Towards a New Role for Science and Technology: [Proceedings of an International Symposium on Science and Technology for Development, Held in Singapore in January 1979]. Pergamon Press.
     
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  7. Dzhermen Mikhaĭlovich Gvishiani (ed.) (1979). Trends and Perspectives in Development of Science and Technology and Their Impact on the Solution of Contemporary Global Problems. Pergamon Press.
     
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  8. Felix Adrian Kantrowitz (ed.) (1968). Who Shall Live and Who Shall Die?: The Ethical Implications of the New Medical Technology. Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
     
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  9. Hans Mark & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.) (1987). Traditional Moral Values in the Age of Technology. Distributed by the University of Texas Press.
     
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  10. Miroslav Pečujlić, Gregory Blue & Anouar Abdel-Malek (eds.) (1982). Science and Technology in the Transformation of the World. United Nations University in Association with St. Martin's Press.
  11. Miroslav Pečujlic, Gregory Blue & Anouar Abdel-Malek (eds.) (1982). Science and Technology in the Transformation of the World. Macmillan Press.
  12. Henry John Steffens & H. N. Muller (eds.) (1974). Science, Technology, and Culture. New York,Ams Press.
  13. S. R. Venkatramaiah & K. Sreenivasa Rao (eds.) (1992). Science, Technology, and Social Development. Discovery Pub. House.
     
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  14. Ralf Dahrendorf (ed.) (1977). Scientific-Technological Revolution: Social Aspects. Sage Publications [for] the International Sociological Association.
     
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  15. János Farkas (ed.) (1979). Sociology of Science and Research. Akadémiai Kiadó.
     
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  16. S. Radhakrishna (ed.) (1980). Views From the Developing World: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 27-30 April 1979. Pergamon Press.
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  17. Michael Fox (1990). Transgenic Animals: Ethical and Animal Welfare Concerns. In Peter Wheale & Athene Trust (eds.), The Bio-revolution: cornucopia or Pandora's box? Pluto Press
     
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  18. Nicholas Maxwell (2015). What's Wrong with Science and Technology Studies? What Needs to Be Done to Put It Right? In R. Pisano & D. Capecchi (eds.), A Bridge Between Conceptual Frameworks: Sciences, Society and Technology Studies. Springer
    After a sketch of the optimism and high aspirations of History and Philosophy of Science when I first joined the field in the mid 1960s, I go on to describe the disastrous impact of "the strong programme" and social constructivism in history and sociology of science. Despite Alan Sokal's brilliant spoof article, and the "science wars" that flared up partly as a result, the whole field of Science and Technology Studies is still adversely affected by social constructivist ideas. I (...)
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  19.  45
    Mark Coeckelbergh (2013). Drones, Information Technology, and Distance: Mapping the Moral Epistemology of Remote Fighting. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 15 (2):87-98.
    Ethical reflection on drone fighting suggests that this practice does not only create physical distance, but also moral distance: far removed from one’s opponent, it becomes easier to kill. This paper discusses this thesis, frames it as a moral-epistemological problem, and explores the role of information technology in bridging and creating distance. Inspired by a broad range of conceptual and empirical resources including ethics of robotics, psychology, phenomenology, and media reports, it is first argued that drone fighting, like other (...)
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  20.  27
    Asle H. Kiran & Peter-Paul Verbeek (2010). Trusting Our Selves to Technology. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):409-427.
    Trust is a central dimension in the relation between human beings and technologies. In many discourses about technology, the relation between human beings and technologies is conceptualized as an external relation: a relation between pre-given entities that can have an impact on each other but that do not mutually constitute each other. From this perspective, relations of trust can vary between reliance, as is present for instance in technological extensionism, and suspicion, as in various precautionary approaches in ethics that (...)
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  21.  39
    Steven Dorrestijn (2012). Technical Mediation and Subjectivation: Tracing and Extending Foucault's Philosophy of Technology. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):221-241.
    This article focuses on tracing and extending Michel Foucault’s contributions to the philosophy of technology. At first sight his work on power seems the most relevant. In his later work on subjectivation and ethics technology is absent. However, notably by recombining Foucault’s work on power with his work on subjectivation, does his work contribute to solving pertinent problems in current approaches to the ethics of technology. First, Foucault’s position is compared to critical theory and Heidegger, and associated (...)
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  22.  22
    Kirsten Martin (2012). Information Technology and Privacy: Conceptual Muddles or Privacy Vacuums? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (4):267-284.
    Within a given conversation or information exchange, do privacy expectations change based on the technology used? Firms regularly require users, customers, and employees to shift existing relationships onto new information technology, yet little is known as about how technology impacts established privacy expectations and norms. Coworkers are asked to use new information technology, users of gmail are asked to use GoogleBuzz, patients and doctors are asked to record health records online, etc. Understanding how privacy expectations change, (...)
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  23.  22
    Michael T. McFall (2012). Real Character-Friends: Aristotelian Friendship, Living Together, and Technology. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):221-230.
    Aristotle’s account of friendship has largely withstood the test of time. Yet there are overlooked elements of his account that, when challenged by apparent threats of current and emerging communication technologies, reveal his account to be remarkably prescient. I evaluate the danger that technological advances in communication pose to the future of friendship by examining and defending Aristotle’s claim that perfect or character-friends must live together. I concede that technologically-mediated communication can aid existing character-friendships, but I argue that character-friendships cannot (...)
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  24. Robin S. Dillon (2010). Respect for Persons, Identity, and Information Technology. Ethics and Information Technology 12 (1):17-28.
    There is surprisingly little attention in Information Technology ethics to respect for persons, either as an ethical issue or as a core value of IT ethics or as a conceptual tool for discussing ethical issues of IT. In this, IT ethics is very different from another field of applied ethics, bioethics, where respect is a core value and conceptual tool. This paper argues that there is value in thinking about ethical issues related to information technologies, especially, though not exclusively, (...)
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  25.  69
    Lucas D. Introna (2007). Maintaining the Reversibility of Foldings: Making the Ethics (Politics) of Information Technology Visible. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (1):11-25.
    This paper will address the question of the morality of technology. I believe this is an important question for our contemporary society in which technology, especially information technology, is increasingly becoming the default mode of social ordering. I want to suggest that the conventional manner of conceptualising the morality of technology is inadequate – even dangerous. The conventional view of technology is that technology represents technical means to achieve social ends. Thus, the moral problem (...)
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  26.  36
    Anders Albrechtslund (2007). Ethics and Technology Design. Ethics and Information Technology 9 (1):63-72.
    This article offers a discussion of the connection between technology and values and, specifically, I take a closer look at ethically sound design. In order to bring the discussion into a concrete context, the theory of Value Sensitive Design (VSD) will be the focus point. To illustrate my argument concerning design ethics, the discussion involves a case study of an augmented window, designed by the VSD Research Lab, which has turned out to be a potentially surveillance-enabling technology. I (...)
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  27.  19
    Yingqin Zheng & Bernd Carsten Stahl (2011). Technology, Capabilities and Critical Perspectives: What Can Critical Theory Contribute to Sen's Capability Approach? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):69-80.
    This paper explores what insights can be drawn from critical theory to enrich and strengthen Sen’s capability approach in relation to technology and human development. The two theories share some important commonalities: both are concerned with the pursuit of “a good life”; both are normative theories rooted in ethics and meant to make a difference, and both are interested in democracy. The paper provides a brief overview of both schools of thought and their applications to technology and human (...)
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  28.  85
    Albert Borgmann (2011). The Here and Now: Theory, Technology, and Actuality. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):5-17.
    Central figures of American mainstream philosophy have at crucial points in their work been concerned with the concreteness of actual reality, but have in various ways been deflected to primarily technical issues of philosophical analysis. It is possible, however, to see in these concerns a line of inquiry that leads to an examination of what is characteristic of actual reality today and of what is troubling and what is hopeful in it. Technology is a helpful term for the character (...)
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  29. Fiorella Battaglia, Nikil Mukerji & Julian Nida-Rümelin (2014). Science, Technology, and Responsibility. In Fiorella Battaglia, Nikil Mukerji & Julian Nida-Rümelin (eds.), Rethinking Responsibility in Science and Technology. Pisa University Press 7-11.
    The empirical circumstances in which human beings ascribe responsibility to one another are subject to change. Science and technology play a great part in this transformation process. Therefore, it is important for us to rethink the idea, the role and the normative standards behind responsibility in a world that is constantly changing under the influence of scientific and technological progress. This volume is a contribution to that joint societal effort.
     
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  30.  17
    Joseph C. Pitt (2010). It’s Not About Technology. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):445-454.
    It is argued that the question “Can we trust technology?” is unanswerable because it is open-ended. Only questions about specific issues that can have specific answers should be entertained. It is further argued that the reason the question cannot be answered is that there is no such thing as Technology simpliciter. Fundamentally, the question comes down to trusting people and even then, the question has to be specific about trusting a person to do this or that.
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  31.  12
    David M. Wasieleski & Mordechai Gal-Or (2008). An Enquiry Into the Ethical Efficacy of the Use of Radio Frequency Identification Technology. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):27-40.
    This paper provides an in-depth analysis of the privacy rights dilemma surrounding radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. As one example of ubiquitous information system, RFID has multitudinous applications in various industries and businesses across society. The use of this technology will have to lead to a policy setting dilemma in that a balance between individuals’ privacy concerns and the benefits that they derive from it must be drawn. After describing the basic RFID technology some of its most (...)
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  32.  58
    Martin Brigham & Lucas D. Introna (2007). Invoking Politics and Ethics in the Design of Information Technology: Undesigning the Design. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (1):1-10.
    It is a truism that the design and deployment of information and communication technologies is vital to everyday life, the conduct of work and to social order. But how are individual, organisational and societal choices made? What might it mean to invoke a politics and an ethics of information technology design and use? This editorial paper situates these questions within the trajectory of preoccupations and approaches to the design and deployment of information technology since computerisation began in the (...)
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  33.  36
    Kurt Seemann (2003). Basic Principles in Holistic Technology Education. Journal of Technology Education 14 (2):15.
    A school that adopts a curriculum, that aims for a holistic understanding of technology, does so because it produces a better educated person than a curriculum which does not. How do we know when we are teaching technology holistically and why must we do so? Increasingly, more is asked of technology educators to be holistic in the understanding conveyed to learners of technology itself in order to make better informed technical and design decisions in a wider (...)
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  34.  35
    Philip J. Nickel, Maarten Franssen & Peter Kroes (2010). Can We Make Sense of the Notion of Trustworthy Technology? Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3-4):429-444.
    In this paper we raise the question whether technological artifacts can properly speaking be trusted or said to be trustworthy. First, we set out some prevalent accounts of trust and trustworthiness and explain how they compare with the engineer’s notion of reliability. We distinguish between pure rational-choice accounts of trust, which do not differ in principle from mere judgments of reliability, and what we call “motivation-attributing” accounts of trust, which attribute specific motivations to trustworthy entities. Then we consider some examples (...)
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  35.  4
    Steffen Steinert (2016). Taking Stock of Extension Theory of Technology. Philosophy and Technology 29 (1):61-78.
    In this paper, I will focus on the extension theories of technology. I will identify four influential positions that have been put forward: (1) technology as an extension of the human organism, (2) technology as an extension of the lived body and the senses, (3) technology as an extension of our intentions and desires, and (4) technology as an extension of our faculties and capabilities. I will describe and critically assess these positions one by one (...)
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  36.  7
    William F. Birdsall (2011). Human Capabilities and Information and Communication Technology: The Communicative Connection. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):93-106.
    The potential contributions information and communication technology (ICT) can make to advancing human capabilities are acknowledged by both the capability approach (CA) and ICT communities. However, there is a lack of genuine engagement between the two communities. This paper addresses the question: How can a collaborative dialogue between the CA and ICT communities be advanced? A prerequisite to exploring collaboratively the potential use of particular technologies with specific capabilities is a conceptual framework within which a dialogue can be undertaken (...)
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  37.  8
    Akhlaque Haque (2003). Information Technology, GIS and Democraticvalues: Ethical Implications for ITprofessionals in Public Service. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 5 (1):39-48.
    Information technologies (IT) play a criticalrole in transforming public administration andredefining the role of bureaucracy in ademocratic society. New applications of ITbring great promises for government, but at thesame time raise concerns about administrativepower and its abuse. Using GeographicInformation Systems (GIS) as the centralexample, this paper provides the philosophicalunderpinnings of the role of technology anddiscusses the importance of an ethicaldiscourse in IT for public serviceprofessionals. Such ethical discourse must bebased on upholding the democratic values andpreserving the institutional integrity of (...)
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  38. Philip J. Nickel, Maarten Franssen & Peter Kroes (2010). Can We Make Sense of the Notion of Trustworthy Technology? Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):429-444.
    In this paper we raise the question whether technological artifacts can properly speaking be trusted or said to be trustworthy. First, we set out some prevalent accounts of trust and trustworthiness and explain how they compare with the engineer’s notion of reliability. We distinguish between pure rational-choice accounts of trust, which do not differ in principle from mere judgments of reliability, and what we call “motivation-attributing” accounts of trust, which attribute specific motivations to trustworthy entities. Then we consider some examples (...)
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  39. Peter-Paul Verbeek (2005). What Things Do: Philosophical Reflections on Technology, Agency, and Design. Penn State University Press.
    This paper praises and criticizes Peter-Paul Verbeek's What Things Do . The four things that Verbeek does well are: remind us of the importance of technological things; bring Karl Jaspers into the conversation on technology; explain how technology "co-shapes" experience by reading Bruno Latour's actor-network theory in light of Don Ihde's post-phenomenology; develop a material aesthetics of design. The three things that Verbeek does not do well are: analyze the material conditions in which things are produced; criticize the (...)
     
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  40. Martin Heidegger (1977). The Question Concerning Technology, and Other Essays. Harper & Row.
    The question concerning technology.--The turning.--The word of Nietzsche: "God is dead."--The age of the world picture.--Science and reflection.
     
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  41. Mahon O'Brien (2011). The Future of Humanity: Heidegger, Personhood and Technology. Comparative Philosophy 2 (2):23-49.
    This paper argues that a number of entrenched posthumanist positions are seriously flawed as a result of their dependence on a technical interpretive approach that creates more problems than it solves. During the course of our discussion we consider in particular the question of personhood. After all, until we can determine what it means to be a person we cannot really discuss what it means to improve a person. What kinds of enhancements would even constitute improvements? This in turn leads (...)
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  42.  9
    Andrew Feenberg (1999). Questioning Technology. Routledge.
    In this extraordinary introduction to the study of the philosophy of technology, Andrew Feenberg argues that techonological design is central to the social and political structure of modern societies. Environmentalism, information technology, and medical advances testify to technology's crucial importance. In his lucid and engaging style, Feenberg shows that technology is the medium of daily life. Every major technical changes reverberates at countless levels: economic, political, and cultural. If we continue to see the social and technical (...)
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  43.  97
    Tsjalling Swierstra & Arie Rip (2007). Nano-Ethics as NEST-Ethics: Patterns of Moral Argumentation About New and Emerging Science and Technology. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (1):3-20.
    There might not be a specific nano-ethics, but there definitely is an ethics of new & emerging science and technology (NEST), with characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation. Ethical discussion in and around nanoscience and technology reflects such NEST-ethics. We offer an inventory of the arguments, and show patterns in their evolution, in arenas full of proponents and opponents. We also show that there are some nano-specific issues: in how size matters, and when agency is delegated to (...)
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  44.  91
    Andrew Feenberg (2002). Transforming Technology: A Critical Theory Revisited. Oxford University Press.
    Thoroughly revised, this new edition of Critical Theory of Technology rethinks the relationships between technology, rationality, and democracy, arguing that the degradation of labor--as well as of many environmental, educational, and political systems--is rooted in the social values that preside over technological development. It contains materials on political theory, but the emphasis has shifted to reflect a growing interest in the fields of technology and cultural studies.
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  45.  6
    Don Ihde (2001). Bodies in Technology. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    In this book, a leading philosopher of technology explores the meaning of bodies in technology—how the sense of our bodies and of our orientation in the world is affected by the various information technologies.
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  46.  32
    Carl Mitcham (1994). Thinking Through Technology: The Path Between Engineering and Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    What does it mean to think about technology philosophically? Why try? These are the issues that Carl Mitcham addresses in this work, a comprehensive, critical introduction to the philosophy of technology and a discussion of its sources and uses. Tracing the changing meaning of "technology" from ancient times to our own, Mitcham identifies the most important traditions of critical analysis of technology: the engineering approach, which assumes the centrality of technology in human life and the (...)
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  47. Shannon Vallor (2010). Social Networking Technology and the Virtues. Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):157-170.
    This paper argues in favor of more widespread and systematic applications of a virtue-based normative framework to questions about the ethical impact of information technologies, and social networking technologies in particular. The first stage of the argument identifies several distinctive features of virtue ethics that make it uniquely suited to the domain of IT ethics, while remaining complementary to other normative approaches. I also note its potential to reconcile a number of significant methodological conflicts and debates in the existing literature, (...)
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  48.  85
    Albert Borgmann (1984). Technology and the Character of Contemporary Life: A Philosophical Inquiry. University of Chicago Press.
    Blending social analysis and philosophy, Albert Borgmann maintains that technology creates a controlling pattern in our lives.
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  49.  79
    Alfred Gierer (2004). Human Brain Evolution, Theories of Innovation, and Lessons From the History of Technology. J. Biosci 29 (3):235-244.
    Biological evolution and technological innovation, while differing in many respects, also share common features. In particular, implementation of a new technology in the market is analogous to the spreading of a new genetic trait in a population. Technological innovation may occur either through the accumulation of quantitative changes, as in the development of the ocean clipper, or it may be initiated by a new combination of features or subsystems, as in the case of steamships. Other examples of the latter (...)
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  50. Jamie P. Ross (2010). “The Obvious Invisibility of the Relationship Between Technology and Social Values.”. International Journal of Science in Society, Vol. 2, No.1, P. 51-62, CG Publisher. 2010 2 (1):51-62.
    Abstract -/- “The Obvious Invisibility of the Relationship Between Technology and Social Values” -/- We all too often assume that technology is the product of objective scientific research. And, we assume that technology’s moral value lies in only the moral character of its user. Yet, in order to objectify technology in a manner that removes it from a moral realm, we rely on the assumption that technology is value neutral, i.e., it is independent of all (...)
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