Search results for 'Technology and civilization' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrzej Kiepas (2013). Eco-Philosophy and the Rationality of Science and Technology. Henryk Skolimowski's Criticism of Technological Civilization. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (4):127-139.score: 130.0
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  2. Steve Reece (2010). The History of Writing (B.P.) Powell Writing. Theory and History of the Technology of Civilization. Pp. Xx + 276, Ills, Maps. Malden, MA and Oxford: Wiley–Blackwell, 2009. Cased, £50, €60. ISBN: 978-1-4051-6256-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (02):585-587.score: 120.0
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  3. Hiroshi Inose & John Pierce (1984). Information Technology and Civilization. World Futures 19 (3):293-303.score: 120.0
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  4. Claude Calame (forthcoming). From the Civilization of Prometheus to Genetic Engineering: The Role of Technology and the Uses of Metaphor. Arion 13 (2).score: 120.0
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  5. Marc Pierce (2012). Writing: Theory and History of the Technology of Civilization (Review). Classical World 105 (4):566-567.score: 120.0
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  6. Henryk Skolimowski (1974). Technology Assessment as a Critique of a Civilization. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1974:459 - 465.score: 120.0
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  7. William Barrett (1978). The Illusion of Technique: A Search for Meaning in a Technological Civilization. Anchor Press.score: 118.0
     
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  8. Adam Green (2006). Matter and Psyche: Lewis Mumford's Appropriation of Marx and Jung in His Appraisal of the Condition of Man in Technological Civilization. History of the Human Sciences 19 (3):33-64.score: 96.0
    The aim of this article is to draw attention to the breadth and importance of Mumford's philosophical outlook by exploring his critical appropriation of the theories of Marx and Jung which he employed to create a penetrating, visionary collection of works that offer us a powerful and timely insight into the ills besetting our current technological civilization. Mumford partially accepted Marx's matter–psyche dynamic but expanded it to include architecture, technology and urban planning. He surpassed the one-way process of (...)
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  9. Vladimir Davchev (2008). Technological Civilization. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 48:5-23.score: 94.0
    One of the 20th century's most popular non-realistic genre is absurd. The root "absurd," connotes something that does not follow the roots of logic. Existence is fragmented, pointless. There is no truth so the search for truth is abandoned in Absurdist works. Language is reduced to a bantering game where words obfuscate rather elucidate the truth. Action moves outside of the realm of causality to chaos. Absurdists minimalize the sense of place. Characters are forced to move in an incomprehensible, void-like (...)
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  10. Daniel Lee Kleinman (2005). Science and Technology in Society: From Biotechnology to the Internet. Blackwell Pub..score: 84.0
    This thoughtful and engaging text challenges the widely held notion of science as somehow outside of society, and the idea that technology proceeds automatically down a singular and inevitable path. Through specific case studies involving contemporary debates, this book shows that science and technology are fundamentally part of society and are shaped by it. Draws on concepts from political sociology, organizational analysis, and contemporary social theory. Avoids dense theoretical debate. Includes case studies and concluding chapter summaries for students (...)
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  11. John P. McCormick (1997). Carl Schmitt's Critique of Liberalism: Against Politics as Technology. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    This is the first in-depth critical appraisal in English of the political, legal, and cultural writings of Carl Schmitt, perhaps this century's most brilliant critic of liberalism. It offers an assessment of this most sophisticated of fascist theorists without attempting either to apologise for or demonise him. Schmitt's Weimar writings confront the role of technology as it finds expression through the principles and practices of liberalism. Contemporary political conditions such as disaffection with liberalism and the rise of extremist political (...)
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  12. Jennifer Daryl Slack (2005). Culture + Technology: A Primer. Peter Lang.score: 84.0
    This book is a must read for anyone who cares about the place of technology in our lives.
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  13. Ryōsuke Ōhashi (2014). Anti-Nature in Nature Itself. Comparative Philosophy 5 (2).score: 84.0
    Nature and civilization are often regarded in opposition to each other. However, civilization employs technologies and is based on laws of nature. Also, the historical world is a result of the development of the natural world. An “anti-nature” must thus be contained somewhere within nature. The idea of “ anti-nature ” is neither alien to the Eastern nor to the Western traditional concepts of nature. The philosophy of Lao Zi never embraces mere naturalism. Lao Zi has observed that (...)
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  14. Danila Bertasio (1993). The Role of Culture in the Technological Advancement Process. AI and Society 7 (3):248-252.score: 82.0
    The role of cultural models in the process of adaptation to the new technologies is very different according to different civilizations. Some basic cultural items seem to be particularly crucial, such as, for example, the levels of pragmatism or rationalism which characterize a civilization or some periods of its history. This paper presents a sketch aimed at setting up a comparison between Western and Eastern cultures facing the problem of adapting to new technologies. The concept ofcold utilitarianism is introduced. (...)
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  15. Casper Bruun Jensen & Kjetil Rödje (eds.) (2010). Deleuzian Intersections: Science, Technology, Anthropology. Berghahn Books.score: 78.0
    This volume outlines a Deleuzian approach to analyzing science, culture and politics.
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  16. Pierre Lemonnier (1992). Elements for an Anthropology of Technology. Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan.score: 78.0
     
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  17. Linda L. Layne, Sharra Louise Vostral & Kate Boyer (eds.) (2010). Feminist Technology. University of Illinois Press.score: 78.0
  18. Edward McIrvine (ed.) (1967). Dialogue on Technology. Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill.score: 78.0
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  19. H. P. Rickman (1967). Living with Technology. London, Hodder & Stoughton in Association with Hilary Rubinstein.score: 78.0
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  20. S. O. Wey (1984). The World at Adult Stage: Religion, Geopolitics, and Technology in the Twenty-First Century. Evans Brothers.score: 78.0
     
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  21. Dominic Pettman (2006). Love and Other Technologies: Retrofitting Eros for the Information Age. Fordham University Press.score: 76.0
    Can love really be considered another form of technology?Dominic Pettman says it can—although not before carefully redefining technology as a cultural challenge to what we mean by the "human" in the information age. Using the writings of such important thinkers as Giorgio Agamben, Jean-Luc Nancy, and Bernard Stiegler as a springboard, Pettman explores the "techtonic" movements of contemporary culture, specifically in relation to the language of eros. Highly ritualized expressions of desire—love, in other words—always reveal an era's attitude (...)
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  22. Ian Angus (2012). The Pathos of a First Meeting: Particularity and Singularity in the Critique of Technological Civilization. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 16 (1):179-202.score: 72.0
    An essay is presented on the content of critic George Grant's conception and clarity of particularity by comparing it to Reiner Schürmann's concept of singularity. It says that the importance of positive expression of the endangered good plays a central role in Grant's motivation of criticizing technological civilization. It mentions that Grant's philosophy of love and knowledge came from the influences of Jerusalem and Greece. Moreover, the five-step existential logic is discussed.
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  23. M. Andrew Holowchak (2010). Technology and Freudian Discontent: Freud's'muffled' Meliorism and the Problem of Human Annihilation. Sophia 49 (1):95-111.score: 66.0
    This paper is a comprehensive investigation of Freud’s views on technology and human well-being, with a focus on ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’. In spite of his thesis in ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’, I shall argue that Freud, always in some measure under the influence of Comtean progressivism, was consistently a meliorist: He was always at least guardedly optimistic about the realizable prospect of utopia, under the ‘soft dictatorship’ of reason and guided by advances in science and (...), in spite of due recognition in his later years of the possibility of annihilation through technological advances in warfare. The possibility of human annihilation, then, muffled Freud’s meliorism. Freud’s ‘muffled meliorism’, however, was not a quiet commitment to viewing technology as something good. Ultimately, Freud steered a middle course between techno-advocacy and techno-antagonism. The technologies of science, like the discoveries of psychoanalysis, were tools for humans that could be used for human betterment or, as war showed, for human degeneration. (shrink)
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  24. Andrew Feenberg (1991). Critical Theory of Technology. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Modern technology is more than a neutral tool: it is the framework of our civilization and shapes our way of life. Social critics claim that we must choose between this way of life and human values. Critical Theory of Technology challenges that pessimistic cliche. This pathbreaking book argues that the roots of the degradation of labor, education, and the environment lie not in technology per se but in the cultural values embodied in its design. Rejecting such (...)
     
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  25. David F. Channell (1991). The Vital Machine: A Study of Technology and Organic Life. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    In 1738, Jacques Vaucanson unveiled his masterpiece before the court of Louis XV: a gilded copper duck that ate, drank, quacked, flapped its wings, splashed about, and, most astonishing of all, digested its food and excreted the remains. The imitation of life by technology fascinated Vaucanson's contemporaries. Today our technology is more powerful, but our fascination is tempered with apprehension. Artificial intelligence and genetic engineering, to name just two areas, raise profoundly disturbing ethical issues that undermine our most (...)
     
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  26. Yaron Ezrahi (1992). Technology and the Civil Epistemology of Democracy. Inquiry 35 (3 & 4):363 – 376.score: 60.0
    In analogy with Rousseau's concept of ?civil religion? as a system of ?positive dogmas?, ?without which?, as he observed, ?a man cannot be a good citizen?, this paper advances the concept of ?civil epistemology? as the positive dogmas without which the agents of government actions cannot be held accountable by democratic citizens. The civil epistemology of democracy shapes the citizen's views on the nature of political reality, on how the facts of political reality can be known and by whom. Modern (...)
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  27. Peter Wehling (2012). From Invited to Uninvited Participation (and Back?): Rethinking Civil Society Engagement in Technology Assessment and Development. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):43-60.score: 60.0
    In recent years, citizens’ and civil society engagement with science and technology has become almost synonymous with participation in institutionally organized formats of participatory technology assessment (pTA) such as consensus conferences or stakeholder dialogues. Contrary to this view, it is argued in the article that beyond these standardized models of “invited” participation, there exist various forms of “uninvited” and independent civil society engagement, which frequently not only have more significant impact but are profoundly democratically legitimate as well. Using (...)
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  28. Jacques Ellul (1964). The Technological Society. New York, Knopf.score: 58.0
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  29. Vir Singh (2012). Science, Civilization and Happiness. A Vision of Hope. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (3):27-37.score: 54.0
    Science took a wrong turn with the birth of its daughter, the technology, with whose guidance the civilization ushered in the Industrial Age in mid-18th century. From here a drama of science’s increasing dominance over civilization began. The science–civilization marriage has been quite inconvenient. However, the civilization, at this juncture, cannot divorce science. Its dependence on science and technology has increased to an extent that without it the world will come almost to standstill. Science (...)
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  30. Ashok K. Gangadean (2006). A Planetary Crisis of Consciousness: The End of Ego-Based Cultures and Our Dimensional Shift Toward a Sustainable Global Civilization. World Futures 62 (6):441 – 454.score: 54.0
    This essay presents central themes from my forthcoming book, The Awakening of the Global Mind. This book seeks to open a new frontier of Global Consciousness that has been long emerging in human evolution through the ages. When we step back from our more localized perspectives and expand into a more integral, holistic, and global space through the awakening of the global mind we are able to discern striking mega-trends in cultural evolution across diverse cultural and religious worldviews and perspectives (...)
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  31. Louis H. Bluhm (1987). Trust, Terrorism, and Technology. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):333 - 341.score: 54.0
    The development of civilization implies an evolution of complex trust mechanisms which integrate the social system and form bonds which allow individuals to interact, even if they are strangers. Key elements of trust are predictability of consequences and an evaluation of consequences in terms of self-interest or values. Values, ethics, and norms enhance predictability. The terrorist introduces an unpredictable event which has negative consequences, thus destroying trust. However, terrorist-like situations occur in day-to-day activities. Technology itself makes the world (...)
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  32. Alexander Laszlo (2003). The Evolutionary Challenge for Technology. World Futures 59 (8):639 – 645.score: 54.0
    The evolutionary challenge for technology in the third millennium is one of designing the vehicles for sustainable human and societal development in partnership with earth. The challenge calls for the conscious creation of evolutionary systems-not through the "hard technologies" that shape and mold the physical infrastructure of our planet, but through "soft technologies" that augment creative and constructive processes of human interaction. Through them, humanity has the opportunity to create the conditions for the emergence of a true learning society (...)
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  33. Bruce J. Petrie (2010). William Sims Bainbridge. The Warcraft Civilization: Social Science in a Virtual World. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):270-272.score: 54.0
    New branches of social science primarily engaging the “internet revolution” are appearing alongside mainstream research and journals such as Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking are providing social scientists with an outlet of peer-reviewed research. HPS scholars will find new methodologies and the relation of technology to social science of particularly interest. Social scientists are becoming increasingly interested in virtual realities (see Milburn (Spontaneous Generations 2008, 63)) and are declaring time spent “in-game” ethnographic research. William Sims Bainbridge boasts 2300+ hours (...)
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  34. Barry Allen (2003). Knowledge and Civilization. Westview Press.score: 54.0
    Knowledge and Civilization advances detailed criticism of philosophy's usual approach to knowledge and describes a redirection, away from textbook problems of epistemology, toward an ecological philosophy of technology and civilization. Rejecting theories that confine knowledge to language or discourse, Allen situates knowledge in the greater field of artifacts, technical performance, and human evolution. His wide ranging considerations draw on ideas from evolutionary biology, archaeology, anthropology, and the history of cities, art, and technology.
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  35. Seung-Hoon Jeong (2013). A Global Cinematic Zone of Animal and Technology. Angelaki 18 (1):139-157.score: 54.0
    Taking the animal and the machine as two ontological others of the human, this paper looks into how they ?are added to? and ?replace? the humanist others based on race, gender, class, etc. in contemporary cinema. This ?supplement? urges us to reframe identity politics and cultural studies in a larger ?polis? emerging between and encompassing both the human world, which becomes ever more globally homogenized, and its radical environment, natural or technological. The topic is a global cinematic phenomenon that even (...)
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  36. Pedro Geiger (2011). Civilization, Mode of Production, Ages of History and the Three-Legged Movements. Dialogue and Universalism 21 (1):123-134.score: 54.0
    Since its presumed origin by the big bang, about 14 pasts billion years, the Universe is composed of entities, or objects, that produce movements that produce new objects that produce new movements, in an endless sequence.The human mind is one of these entities, whose movements are capable to produce many objects, materialized or as ideas. Those objects in their turn will interact with the mind and new movements will be produced. This process had composed the history of mankind.The Nature presents (...)
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  37. Isaac Tseggai (2012). African Civilization. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (2):75-87.score: 54.0
    Africa prides itself in its ancient civilizations, but the celebratory value of those civilizations is overshadowed by the recurrent challenges of poverty, political and religious wars, ethnic strife, and unrelenting tyrannical rule. Of all these challenges, the inabilities of state institutions to reconcile religious and confessional divisions represent the hardest. Scholars on civilization have in recent years contemplated operationalizing of scientific thinking. The sense of nationalism that tends to look at civilizations as sacred attributes of societies is challenged by (...)
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  38. Ullrich Melle (1998). Responsibility and the Crisis of Technological Civilization: A Husserlian Meditation on Hans Jonas. [REVIEW] Human Studies 21 (4):329-345.score: 52.0
    Starting from a reflection on the present stage of technological civilisation, a critical reading of Jonas's ethics of responsibility from a Husserlian point of view is presented. It is argued that Jonas's ethics fails to meet the challenge of the collective character of technological action, that his view of human history is problematic and that the metaphysical foundation of his ethics is uncritical and naive.
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  39. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1997). The Transhuman Condition: A Report on Machines, Technics, and Evolution. Routledge.score: 50.0
    Evolution is seen to be entering a bio-technological phase. Nietzsche's affirmation that "man is something that must be overcome" no longer has a rhetorical ring given the means at our disposal at the end of the twentieth century. Viroid Life boldly challenges existing explanations of these changes inherited from modernity, arguing that they have exhausted their usefulness and new models are needed to guide us in mapping through the future. Exploring and critically examining the new realities of artificial life that (...)
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  40. Karl-Otto Apel (1987). The Problem of a Macroethic of Responsibility to the Future in the Crisis of Technological Civilization: An Attempt to Come to Terms with Hans Jonas's ?Principle of Responsibility? Man and World 20 (1):3-40.score: 50.0
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  41. Jan Szczepański & Antoni Szymanowski (1975). Florian Znaniecki's Views of Technological Civilization. Dialectics and Humanism 2 (2):45-54.score: 50.0
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  42. Donna Jeanne Haraway (1997). Modest₋Witness@Second₋Millennium.Femaleman₋Meets₋Oncomouse: Feminism and Technoscience. Routledge.score: 50.0
    Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium. FemaleMan_Meets_OncoMouse explores the roles of stories, figures, dreams, theories, facts, delusions, advertising, institutions, economic arrangements, publishing practices, scientific advances, and politics in twentieth- century technoscience. The book's title is an e-mail address. With it, Haraway locates herself and her readers in a sprawling net of associations more far-flung than the Internet. The address is not a cozy home. There is no innocent place to stand in the world where the book's author figure, FemaleMan, encounters DuPont's controversial laboratory rodent, OncoMouse. (...)
     
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  43. Ren Kai (2002). Ecological Crisis Consciousness of Technological Civilized Society. Modern Philosophy 2:007.score: 50.0
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  44. Murray Bookchin (2005). The Ecology of Freedom: The Emergence and Dissolution of Hierarchy. Oakland, Ca ;Ak Press.score: 48.0
    " With this succinct formulation, Murray Bookchin launches his most ambitious work, The Ecology of Freedom.
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  45. William Leiss (1972/1974). The Domination of Nature. Boston,Beacon Press.score: 48.0
    In Part One Leiss traces the idea of the domination of nature from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century.
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  46. Erich Fromm (1968/2010). The Revolution of Hope. New York, Harper & Row.score: 48.0
    Publisher's Foreword As the present book is reissued, The American Mental Health Foundation celebrates its 86th anniversary. Organized in 1924, AMHF is ...
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  47. Morris Berman (1981). The Reenchantment of the World. Cornell University Press.score: 48.0
    Focusing on the rise of the mechanistic idea that we can know the natural world only by distancing ourselves from it, Berman shows how science acquired its ...
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  48. Sally Munt (ed.) (2001). Technospaces: Inside the New Media. Continuum.score: 48.0
    In this book, an international team of authors explore themes of depth and surface, of real and conceptual space and of human/machine interaction.
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  49. Kirkpatrick Sale (1985/2000). Dwellers in the Land: The Bioregional Vision. University of Georgia Press.score: 48.0
    Dwellers in the Land focuses on the realistic development of these bioregionally focused communities and the places where they are established to create a ...
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  50. William Vitek (1997). Privacy's Place: The Role of Civility and Community in a Technological Culture. Ethics and Behavior 7 (3):265 – 270.score: 48.0
    It is often claimed that if technology becomes too intrusive it can be reigned in by better technologies and laws that restrict access. This article argues through a series of propositions and observations why these standard solutions will invariably fall short, and why civility--and the placed communities out of which civility arises--is our best hope against technological assaults on privacy. The article ends with a brief discussion of what sorts of personal and professional commitments a civil culture entails.
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