Search results for 'Technology and law' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mireille Hildebrandt & Antoinette Rouvroy (eds.) (2011). Law, Human Agency, and Autonomic Computing: The Philosophy of Law Meets the Philosophy of Technology. Routledge.score: 120.0
     
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  2. M. Hildebrandt & Antoinette Rouvroy (eds.) (2011). The Philosophy of Law Meets the Philosophy of Technology: Autonomic Computing and Transformations of Human Agency. Routledge.score: 120.0
     
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  3. V. Fineschi (2005). The New Italian Law on Assisted Reproduction Technology (Law 40/2004). Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (9):536-539.score: 114.0
    The Italian parliament passed the law on assisted reproduction after a heated debate. The promulgation of this law (Law 40/2004) is the end point of a long and troubled journey that has seen many bills come and go, all of which have failed. The law consists of a whole set of regulations that will have a great impact on health and on society in general. The law is against many of the technical practices of assisted reproduction; several such practices are (...)
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  4. U. Pagallo (2012). Cracking Down on Autonomy: Three Challenges to Design in IT Law. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (4):319-328.score: 108.0
    The paper examines how technology challenges conventional borders of national legal systems, as shown by cases that scholars address as a part of their everyday work in the fields of information technology (IT)-Law, i.e., computer crimes, data protection, digital copyright, and so forth. Information on the internet has in fact a ubiquitous nature that transcends political borders and questions the notion of the law as made of commands enforced through physical sanctions. Whereas many of today’s impasses on jurisdiction, (...)
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  5. Anthony Mark Cutter & Bert Gordijn (2009). Ethics, Law, Technology and Policymaking: An Editorial. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (2).score: 96.0
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  6. Susan L. Crockin (2010). Legal Conceptions: The Evolving Law and Policy of Assisted Reproductive Technologies. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 96.0
    Embryo litigation -- Access to ART treatment : insurance and discrimination -- General professional liability litigation -- Paternity and donor insemination -- Maternity and egg donation -- Traditional and gestational surrogacy arrangements -- Posthumous reproduction : access and parentage -- Same-sex parentage and ART -- Genetics (PGD) and ART -- ART-related embryonic stem cell legal developments -- ART-related adoption litigation -- ART-related fetal litigation and abortion-related litigation.
     
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  7. Ayman Shabana (2012). Paternity Between Law and Biology: The Reconstruction of the Islamic Law of Paternity in the Wake of Dna Testing. Zygon 47 (1):214-239.score: 90.0
    Abstract: The discovery of DNA paternity tests has stirred a debate concerning the definition of paternity and whether the grounds for such a definition are legal or biological. According to the classical rules of Islamic law, paternity is established and negated on the basis of a valid marriage. Modern biomedical technology raises the question of whether paternity tests can be the sole basis for paternity, even independently of marriage. Although on the surface this technology seems to challenge the (...)
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  8. Marc Lauritsen (1995). Technology Report: Work Product Retrieval Systems in Today's Law Offices. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 3 (4):287-304.score: 90.0
    Contemporary law offices use many different technologies for storing and retrieving documents produced in the course of legal work. This article examines two approaches in detail: document management, as exemplified by SoftSolutions, and electronic publishing, as exemplified by Folio VIEWS. Some other approaches are reviewed, and the pragmatics, politics, economics, and legalities of legal work product retrieval are discussed.
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  9. Michael Perlin (2009). About the Stanford Technology Law Review. Mind 3:01.score: 90.0
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  10. Carlo Casonato (ed.) (2007). Life, Technology, and Law: Second Forum for Transnational and Comparative Legal Dialogue, Levico Terme, Italy, June 9-10, 2006: Proceedings. [REVIEW] Cedam.score: 84.0
  11. Linda Roberge, Susan Long, Patricia Hassett & David Burnham (2002). Technology and the Changing Practice of Law: An Entrée to Previously Inaccessible Information Via TRAC. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 10 (4):261-282.score: 84.0
    The proliferation of electronic databases is raising someimportant questions about how the evolving access to new or previously inaccessible information is likely to change the practice of law. This paper discusses TRAC, an interesting electronic source of previously inaccessible information that is currently used by members of the media, public interest groups, lawyers, and the federal government. Summaries, reports, and snapshots of TRAC's data can be accessed through a series of public web sites. TRAC's subscription service allows users access to (...)
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  12. Bidart Campos & Germán José (eds.) (1987). Ethics, Law, Science, Technology, and International Cooperation: Córdoba, Argentina, 27/29 March 1984. Council of Advanced International Studies.score: 84.0
     
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  13. Yvonne M. Cripps (1980). Controlling Technology: Genetic Engineering and the Law. Praeger.score: 84.0
     
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  14. Justice M. D. Kirby (1986). Medical Technology and New Frontiers of Family Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):113-119.score: 78.0
  15. Angela McGowan, Michael Schooley, Helen Narvasa, Jocelyn Rankin & Daniel M. Sosin (2003). Symposium on Public Health Law Surveillance: The Nexus of Information Technology and Public Health Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (s4):41-42.score: 78.0
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  16. David B. Resnik & Kelly McPherson Jolley (2004). Reviews in Health Law: Patenting Technology Instead of Identity. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (3):524-527.score: 78.0
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  17. Brian Roux & Michael Falgoust (2013). Information Ethics in the Context of Smart Devices. Ethics and Information Technology 15 (3):183-194.score: 78.0
    In this paper, we employ Extended Cognition as a background for a series of thought experiments about privacy and common used information technology devices. Laptops and smart phones are now widely used devices, but current privacy standards do not adequately address the relationship between the owners of these devices and the information stored on them. Law enforcement treats laptops and smart phones are potential sources of information about criminal activity, but this treatment ignores the use of smart devices as (...)
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  18. Marc Lauritsen (2001). Richard Susskind, Transforming the Law: Essays on Technology, Justice and the Legal Marketplace. (Book Review). [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 9 (4):295-303.score: 78.0
  19. Oskamp Anja (1999). Richard Susskind, the Future of Law, Facing Challenges of Information Technology. Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (4).score: 78.0
     
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  20. Anja Oskamp (1999). Richard Susskind, The Future of Law, Facing Challenges of Information Technology. Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (4):387-391.score: 78.0
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  21. Dr Eugene Schlossberger (1995). Technology and Civil Disobedience: Why Engineers Have a Special Duty to Obey the Law. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):163-168.score: 78.0
    Engineers have a greater responsibility than many other professionals not to commit civil disobedience in performing their jobs as engineers. It does not follow that engineers have no responsibility for their company’s actions. Morally, engineer may be required to speak out within the company or even publicly against her company. An engineer may be required to work on a project or quit her job. None of these acts, generally, are against the law. An engineer may be morally required to commit (...)
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  22. Rosamund Scott (2007). Choosing Between Possible Lives: Law and Ethics of Prenatal and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Hart.score: 78.0
  23. Richard Susskind (2012). Technology and the Law. In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 78.0
     
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  24. D. Brian Scarnecchia (2010). Bioethics, Law, and Human Life Issues: A Catholic Perspective on Marriage, Family, Contraception, Abortion, Reproductive Technology, and Death and Dying. Scarecrow Press.score: 74.0
    Introduction -- Rational anthropology and the difference between persons and animals -- Human freedom and conscience -- The three moral determinants and doubts of conscience -- The principle of double effect and consequentialism -- Cooperation and scandal -- Virtues--natural and supernatural -- Sin and grace -- Revelation -- Reproductive technologies -- Homosexuality and same-sex marriage -- Contraception -- Abortion -- Marriage and family -- End of life issues -- Appendix A : Summary of Evangelium Vitae -- Appendix B : Summary (...)
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  25. Marie Thérèse Meulders-Klein, Ruth Deech & P. Vlaardingerbroek (eds.) (2002). Biomedicine, the Family, and Human Rights. Kluwer Law International.score: 72.0
    This volume examines the impact of advances in genetics and assisted reproduction technologies on family law, human rights and the rights of the child, ...
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  26. Roger M. Boisjoly (1995). Commentary on “Technology and Civil Disobedience: Why Engineers Have a Special Duty to Obey the Law”. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):169-171.score: 72.0
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  27. William Parent (1999). Judith Wagner DeCew, In Pursuit of Privacy: Law, Ethics, and the Rise of Technology:In Pursuit of Privacy: Law, Ethics, and the Rise of Technology. Ethics 109 (2):437-439.score: 72.0
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  28. Insoo Hyun (2008). Review of K. R. Monroe, R. B. Miller, and J. Tobis. Fundamentals of the Stem Cell Debate: The Scientific, Religious, Ethical and Political Issues . Review of C. B. Cohen. Renewing the Stuff of Life: Stem Cells, Ethics, and Public Policy . Review of R. Korobkin with S. R. Munzer. Stem Cell Century: Law and Policy for a Breakthrough Technology. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):57 – 59.score: 72.0
  29. Michael Lynch & Ruth McNally, Forensic DNA Databases : The Co-Production of Law and Surveillance Technology.score: 72.0
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  30. Mohd Shuhaimi Bin Ishak & Sayed Sikandar Shah Haneef (2014). Reproductive Technology: A Critical Analysis of Theological Responses in Christianity and Islam. Zygon 49 (2):396-413.score: 72.0
    Reproductive medical technology has revolutionized the natural order of human procreation. Accordingly, some have celebrated its advent as a new and liberating determinant of kinship at the global level and advocate it as a right to reproductive health while others have frowned upon it as a vehicle for “guiltless exchange of sexual fluid” and commodification of human gametes. Religious voices from both Christianity and Islam range from unthinking adoption to restrictive use. While utilizing this technology to enable the (...)
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  31. David M. Adams (2002). Book Review: Janet L. Dolgin. Families: Law, Gender and Difference and Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age. By New York: New York University Press, 1997. And David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays in Law and Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.score: 72.0
  32. Judith Wagner DeCew (1999). [Book Review] in Pursuit of Privacy, Law, Ethics, and the Rise of Technology. [REVIEW] Ethics 109 (2):437-439.score: 72.0
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  33. Eugene Schlossberger (1995). Technology and Civil Disobedience: Why Engineers Have a Special Duty to Obey the Law. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):163-168.score: 72.0
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  34. A. M. Viens (2007). The Use of Functional Neuroimaging Technology in the Assessment of Loss and Damages in Tort Law. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):63-65.score: 72.0
  35. Justinas Žilinskas (2013). The Influence of Using Cyber Technologies in Armed Conflicts on International Humanitarian Law. Jurisprudence 20 (3):1195-1212.score: 72.0
    Cyber warfare is becoming a new reality with new battles fought everyday on virtual battlefields. For a century and a half, International Humanitarian Law has been a sentry for victims of wars guaranteeing their legal protection from the calamities of war, trying hard to respond to Clausewitz’s “chameleon of war”. Cyber conflict marks new chameleon’s colour together with the unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomic battle systems and other technologies deployed on battlefields. However, it would be greatly erroneous to claim that the (...)
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  36. Paul Gewirtz (forthcoming). Constitutional Law and New Technology. Social Research.score: 72.0
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  37. Kirsty Horsey (2003). Emily Jackson, Regulating Reproduction: Law, Technology and Autonomy, Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2001. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11 (3):311-314.score: 72.0
  38. M. Aultman (1972). Technology and the End of Law. American Journal of Jurisprudence 17 (1):46-79.score: 72.0
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  39. David I. Bainbridge (1995). Contemporary Challenges of Technology for Customary Law. In Christoph J. Nyíri (ed.), Tradition: Proceedings of an International Research Workshop at Ifk, Vienna, 10-12 June 1994. Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften.score: 72.0
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  40. S. C. Borkowski (1999). Judith Wagner DeCew, In Pursuit of Privacy: Law, Ethics and the Rise of Technology. Teaching Business Ethics 3 (4):402-406.score: 72.0
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  41. Philip Cafaro (1999). Judith DeCew, In Pursuit of Privacy: Law, Ethics, and the Rise of Technology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (2):91-93.score: 72.0
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  42. Priska Gisler, Sara Steinert-Borella & Caroline Wiedmer (2009). Double Lives, Double Narratives: Tracing the Story of the Family in Rousseau, the Swiss Civil Code and the Fathers' Rights Debates. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 17 (2):185-204.score: 72.0
    A recent parliamentary postulate in Switzerland calling for joint custody as the legal norm argues that fathers are discriminated against in Swiss divorce law. This postulate has incited a debate which circles around issues of equality, the role of fathers and mothers, and the good of the child. Our article, uniting approaches from literature, cultural studies, and science and technology studies, examines the arguments sparked by the debate with a view to different takes on gender and family. In doing (...)
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  43. J. Mchale (1999). Intersections:Women on Law, Medicine and Technology. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (3):285-286.score: 72.0
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  44. Thérèse Murphy (ed.) (2009). New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    The first IVF baby was born in the 1970s. Less than 20 years later, we had cloning and GM food, and information and communication technologies had transformed everyday life. In 2000, the human genome was sequenced. More recently, there has been much discussion of the economic and social benefits of nanotechnology, and synthetic biology has also been generating controversy. This important volume is a timely contribution to increasing calls for regulation - or better regulation - of these and other new (...)
     
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  45. Stuart S. Nagel (1992). What's New and Useful in Law Analysis Technology? Ratio Juris 5 (2):172-190.score: 72.0
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  46. Beth Simone Noveck (1999). Transparent Space: Law, Technology and Deliberative Democracy in the Information Society. Cultural Values 3 (4):472-491.score: 72.0
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  47. Guy Whitehouse (2008). The Blind Reader's Right to Read: Caught Between Publishers, the Law and Technology. Logos 19 (3):120-128.score: 72.0
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  48. Geert van Calster (2008). Risk Regulation, EU Law and Emerging Technologies: Smother or Smooth? [REVIEW] NanoEthics 2 (1):61-71.score: 70.0
    Risk analysis as a regulatory driver has now become firmly entrenched in public health and environmental protection. Risk analysis at any level essentially has to accommodate two gut feelings of the constituency: whether society should be risk-prone or risk averse, and whether government and its institutions can be trusted to make the necessary decisions with a high or a low degree of discretion. The precautionary principle (or rejection thereof) arguably is the ultimate reflection of the promotion of risk to a (...)
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  49. Zelman Cowen (1985/1986). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.score: 66.0
     
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  50. Karen Eltis (2012). Courts, Litigants and the Digital Age: Law, Ethics and Practice. Irwin Law.score: 66.0
     
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