Search results for 'Technology, Medical legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    D. Hunter & S. Oultram (2008). The Challenge of "Sperm Ships": The Need for the Global Regulation of Medical Technology. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):552-556.
    This paper discusses the notion of using international shipping legislation to provide healthcare technologies to inhabitants of a country on a ship in international waters based just outside the country’s border. This allows technologies that would otherwise be unavailable, regulated or banned to the citizens of a particular nation to be available, just offshore. This is because in international waters ships are governed by the laws of their home nation not those they are nearby. We focus on the example (...)
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  2. Zelman Cowen (1985/1986). Reflections on Medicine, Biotechnology, and the Law. Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press.
     
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  3.  27
    Anna Lydia Svalastog, Petter Gustafsson & Stefan Jansson (2006). Comparative Analysis of the Risk-Handling Procedures for Gene Technology Applications in Medical and Plant Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):465-479.
    In this paper we analyse how the risks associated with research on transgenic plants are regulated in Sweden. The paper outlines the way in which pilot projects in the plant sciences are overseen in Sweden, and discusses the international and national background to the current regulatory system. The historical, and hitherto unexplored, reasons for the evolution of current administrative and legislative procedures in plant science are of particular interest. Specifically, we discuss similarities and differences in the regulation of medicine and (...)
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  4. Thérèse Murphy (ed.) (2009). New Technologies and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
    The first IVF baby was born in the 1970s. Less than 20 years later, we had cloning and GM food, and information and communication technologies had transformed everyday life. In 2000, the human genome was sequenced. More recently, there has been much discussion of the economic and social benefits of nanotechnology, and synthetic biology has also been generating controversy. This important volume is a timely contribution to increasing calls for regulation - or better regulation - of these and other new (...)
     
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  5.  3
    Aurélie Boudard, Nicolas Martelli, Patrice Prognon & Judith Pineau (2013). Clinical Studies of Innovative Medical Devices: What Level of Evidence for Hospital‐Based Health Technology Assessment? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (4):697-702.
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  6.  2
    E. M. M. Adang, A. Ament & C. D. Dirksen (1996). Medical Technology Assessment and the Role of Economic Evaluation in Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2 (4):287-294.
  7. Felix Adrian Kantrowitz (ed.) (1968). Who Shall Live and Who Shall Die?: The Ethical Implications of the New Medical Technology. Union of American Hebrew Congregations.
     
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  8. Margot C. J. Mabie (1993). Bioethics & the New Medical Technology. Maxwell Macmillan International.
     
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  9. Junxin Kang (2009). Sheng Ming Xing Fa Yuan Li. Yuan Zhao Chu Ban You Xian Gong Si.
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  10. Eijirō Kuzuu (2004). Inochi No Hō to Rinri. Hōritsu Bunkasha.
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  11.  40
    Elliot N. Dorff (1998). Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics. Jewish Publication Society.
    In Matters of Life and Death Elliot Dorff thoroughly addresses this unavoidable confluence of medical technology and Jewish law and ethics.
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  12. David Lloyd (2005). Cases in Medical Ethics and Law. Cambridge University Press.
    This interactive independent teaching and learning tutorial can be used by individuals or small groups and takes a problem-based-learning approach to the complex legal and ethical issues raised by six scenarios. Based on real cases clearly demonstrating the problems arising from recent medical advancements, the cases cover reproductive technology, consent, genetic screening, participation in research trials, paternity and confidentiality. Additional features of the CD-ROM are a comprehensive glossary, cross-references to The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook and definitions from the (...)
     
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  13.  55
    A. E. James, S. Perry, S. E. Warner, J. E. Chapman & R. M. Zaner (1991). The Diffusion of Medical Technology: Free Enterprise and Regulatory Models in the USA. Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (3):150-155.
    The diffusion of technology in the US has taken place in an environment of both regulation and free enterprise. Each has been subject to manipulation by doctors and medical administrators that has fostered unprecedented ethical dilemmas and legal challenges. Understanding these developments and historical precedents may allow a more rational diffusion policy for medical technology in the future.
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  14.  1
    Soma Hewa (1994). Medical Technology: A Pandora's Box? [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 15 (3):171-181.
    This paper examines the development of medical technology in terms of Max Weber's theory of rationalization. It argues that medical technology is a part of the general process of social, political and economic changes in modern Western societies. Medical technology today keeps many people alive who, in the past, would have died from their illness. In recent years, burgeoning technological achievements in medicine have been regarded as a threat to the individual's freedom to die. Many people believe (...)
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  15.  6
    Gert J. Van Der Wilt (1995). Empirical and Normative Aspects of Medical Technology Assessment. The Case of Reduced-Size Liver Transplantations with Living Donors. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (3).
    Medical technology assessment deals with the evaluation of novel or existing health care procedures. This paper addresses the interdependence between factual and normative issues, using the controversies about acceptability and desirability of reduced-size liver transplantations with living donors as example.
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  16.  2
    Martina Horvat, Ana Mlinaric, Jelena Omazic & Vesna Supak-Smolcic (forthcoming). An Analysis of Medical Laboratory Technology Journals’ Instructions for Authors. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-12.
    Instructions for authors need to be informative and regularly updated. We hypothesized that journals with a higher impact factor have more comprehensive IFA. The aim of the study was to examine whether IFA of journals indexed in the Journal Citation Reports 2013, “Medical Laboratory Technology” category, are written in accordance with the latest recommendations and whether the quality of instructions correlates with the journals’ IF. 6 out of 31 journals indexed in “Medical Laboratory Technology” category were excluded. The (...)
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  17.  17
    M. Wayne Cooper (1996). The Gastroenterologist and His Endoscope: The Embodiment of Technology and the Necessity for a Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (4).
    The purpose of this essay is to argue for the necessity of an ethics of the practice of the specialist-technologist in medicine. In the first part I sketch three stages of medical ethics, each with a particular viewpoint regarding the technology of medicine. I focus on Brody's consideration of the physician's power as a example of contemporary medical ethics which explicitly excludes the specialist-technologist as a locus of development of medical ethics. Next, the philosophy of Heidegger is (...)
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  18.  8
    Gloria Lankshear & David Mason (2001). Technology and Ethical Dilemmas in a Medical Setting: Privacy, Professional Autonomy, Life and Death. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (3):223-233.
    A growing literature addresses the ethicalimplications of electronic surveillance atwork, frequently assigning ethical priority tovalues such as the right to privacy. Thispaper suggests that, in practice, the issuesare sociologically more complex than someaccounts suggest. This is because manyworkplace electronic technologies not designedor deployed for surveillance purposesnevertheless embody surveillance capacity. Thiscapacity may not be immediately obvious toparticipants or lend itself to simpledeployment. Moreover, because of their primaryfunctions, such systems embody a range of otherfeatures which are potentially beneficial forthose utilising them. As (...)
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  19.  19
    Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith (1998). Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty (...)
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  20.  5
    Iain Brassington (2007). On Heidegger, Medicine, and the Modernity of Modern Medical Technology. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (2):185-195.
    This paper examines medicine’s use of technology in a manner from a standpoint inspired by Heidegger’s thinking on technology. In the first part of the paper, I shall suggest an interpretation of Heidegger’s thinking on the topic, and attempt to show why he associates modern technology with danger. However, I shall also claim that there is little evidence that medicine’s appropriation of modern technology is dangerous in Heidegger’s sense, although there is no prima facie reason why it mightn’t be. The (...)
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  21.  19
    M. J. McNamee (2006). Transhumanism, Medical Technology and Slippery Slopes. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (9):513-518.
    In this article, transhumanism is considered to be a quasi-medical ideology that seeks to promote a variety of therapeutic and human-enhancing aims. Moderate conceptions are distinguished from strong conceptions of transhumanism and the strong conceptions were found to be more problematic than the moderate ones. A particular critique of Boström’s defence of transhumanism is presented. Various forms of slippery slope arguments that may be used for and against transhumanism are discussed and one particular criticism, moral arbitrariness, that undermines both (...)
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  22.  15
    D. Elsner (2006). Just Another Reproductive Technology? The Ethics of Human Reproductive Cloning as an Experimental Medical Procedure. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):596-600.
    Human reproductive cloning has not yet resulted in any live births. There has been widespread condemnation of the practice in both the scientific world and the public sphere, and many countries explicitly outlaw the practice. Concerns about the procedure range from uncertainties about its physical safety to questions about the psychological well-being of clones. Yet, key aspects such as the philosophical implications of harm to future entities and a comparison with established reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilisation are often (...)
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  23.  11
    Robert Mullan Cook-Deegan (1998). Commentary on “Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation” (J. S. Alper and J. Beckwith). [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):151-154.
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  24.  2
    Leif Holmberg (2013). Problem Perception, Technology and Effectiveness in Medical Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):868-874.
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  25. D. Gareth Jones (1999). Valuing People Human Value in a World of Medical Technology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  26.  6
    Joanna Latimer, Katie Featherstone, Paul Atkinson, Angus Clarke, Daniela T. Pilz & Alison Shaw, Rebirthing the Clinic : The Interaction of Clinical Judgement and Genetic Technology in the Production of Medical Science.
    The article reconsiders the nature and location of science in the development of genetic classification. Drawing on field studies of medical genetics, we explore how patient categorization is accomplished in between the clinic and laboratory. We focus on dysmorphology, a specialism concerned with complex syndromes that impair physical development. We show that dys-morphology is about more than fitting patients into prefixed diagnostic categories and that diagnostic process is marked by moments of uncertainty, ambiguity, and deferral. We describe how different (...)
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  27.  5
    Wouter Van Rossum (1991). Decision-Making and Medical Technology Assessment: Three Dutch Cases. Knowledge, Technology & Policy 4 (1):107-124.
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  28.  2
    Kori Cook, Jeremy Snyder & John Calvert (2015). Attitudes Toward Post‐Trial Access to Medical Interventions: A Review of Academic Literature, Legislation, and International Guidelines. [REVIEW] Developing World Bioethics 16 (1).
    There is currently no international consensus around post-trial obligations toward research participants, community members, and host countries. This literature review investigates arguments and attitudes toward post-trial access. The literature review found that academic discussions focused on the rights of research participants, but offered few practical recommendations for addressing or improving current practices. Similarly, there are few regulations or legislation pertaining to post-trial access. If regulatory changes are necessary, we need to understand the current arguments, legislation, and attitudes towards (...)
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  29.  14
    B. E. Gibson, R. E. G. Upshur, N. L. Young & P. McKeever (2007). Disability, Technology, and Place: Social and Ethical Implications of Long-Term Dependency on Medical Devices. Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (1):7 – 28.
    Medical technologies and assistive devices such as ventilators and power wheelchairs are designed to sustain life and/or improve functionality but they can also contribute to stigmatization and social exclusion. In this paper, drawing from a study of ten men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we explore the complex social processes that mediate the lives of persons who are dependent on multiple medical and assistive technologies. In doing so we consider the embodied and emplaced nature of disability and how life (...)
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  30.  9
    Kathleen Welch (2002). Book Review: Life, Death and Love in the Hum of Medical Technology: The Resurrection Machine, by Steve Gehrke. Kansas City, MO: University of Missouri-Kansas City Bookmark Press, 2000. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (3/4):272-274.
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  31.  3
    B. E. Gibson, R. E. G. Upshur, N. L. Young & P. McKeever (2007). Disability, Technology, and Place: Social and Ethical Implications of Long-Term Dependency on Medical Devices. Ethics, Policy and Environment 10 (1):7-28.
    Medical technologies and assistive devices such as ventilators and power wheelchairs are designed to sustain life and/or improve functionality but they can also contribute to stigmatization and social exclusion. In this paper, drawing from a study of ten men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we explore the complex social processes that mediate the lives of persons who are dependent on multiple medical and assistive technologies. In doing so we consider the embodied and emplaced nature of disability and how life (...)
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  32. Tom L. Beauchamp (1987). Medical Ethics in the Age of Technology. In Hans Mark & W. Lawson Taitte (eds.), Traditional Moral Values in the Age of Technology. Distributed by the University of Texas Press
  33. S. J. Kemp & G. Day (2014). Teaching Medical Humanities in the Digital World: Affordances of Technology-Enhanced Learning. Medical Humanities 40 (2):125-130.
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  34. Sigmund Loland (2005). 13 The Vulnerability Thesis and Use of Bio-Medical Technology in Sport. In Claudio Marcello Tamburrini & Torbjörn Tännsjö (eds.), Genetic Technology and Sport: Ethical Questions. Routledge 158.
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  35. P. Koteswara Rao (1992). Technology on The. Medical. In S. R. Venkatramaiah & K. Sreenivasa Rao (eds.), Science, Technology, and Social Development. Discovery Pub. House 93.
     
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  36.  46
    Volker Hess & J. Andrew Mendelsohn (2010). Case and Series. Medical Knowledge and Paper Technology, 1600–1900. History of Science 48 (3-4):3-4.
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  37.  87
    Ian R. McWhinney (1978). Medical Knowledge and the Rise of Technology. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (4):293-304.
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  38.  7
    Henk A. M. J. Have (1995). Medical Technology Assessment and Ethics. Hastings Center Report 25 (5):13-19.
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  39. R. S. Downie (1998). Medical Technology and Medical Futility. Ends and Means 2 (2):1-7.
     
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  40.  1
    W. Rossum (1991). Decision-Making and Medical Technology Assessment: Three Dutch Cases. Knowledge and Policy 4 (1-2):107-124.
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  41.  3
    Joseph C. D'Oronzio & Albuquerque Board (1994). Bette Anton, MLS, is Associate Librarian in the Health and Medical Sciences Department, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley Catherine A. Berglund, B. Sc.(Psych), Ph. D., is an Associate Fellow in the Science and Technology Studies Department, University of Wollongong, Australia, and has Recently Been Awarded Her Doctorate for a Dissertation on Professional And. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3:496-497.
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  42.  4
    Theophile Godfraind (1986). [Challenges Posed By Medical Technology for Christians]. Revue Théologique de Louvain 17 (1):5-21.
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  43.  1
    Hung-Lin Chen, Li-Jiuan Shen, Chih-Ping Wei, Hsin-Min Lu & Fei-Yuan Hsiao (2015). Decision to Adopt Medical Technology Under the National Health Insurance System in Taiwan: Case Study of New Molecular Targeted Drugs Among Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (5):808-816.
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  44.  1
    L. Gillam & K. Weedon (2005). Medical Research and Involuntary Mental Health Patients: Implications of Proposed Changes to Legislation in Victoria. Monash Bioethics Review 24 (4).
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  45.  2
    Michael Herbert (2004). Medical Technology: Master or Tool? Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 9 (3):7.
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  46.  4
    Justice M. D. Kirby (1986). Medical Technology and New Frontiers of Family Law. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 14 (3-4):113-119.
  47.  4
    Mark A. Rothstein (2011). Currents in Contemporary Bioethics: Physicians' Duty to Inform Patients of New Medical Discoveries: The Effect of Health Information Technology. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (4):690-693.
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  48.  3
    Edward T. Porcaro (1979). Experimentation with Children: The "Pawns" of Medical Technology. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 7 (2):6-9.
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  49. Joseph D. Bronzino, Vincent H. Smith, Maurice L. Wade & Russell C. Maulitz (1994). Medical Technology and Society: An Interdisciplinary Perspective. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (3):493.
     
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  50. Randy W. Dipner, Susan Brummel, Virginal Stern, Larry Oliver, Katherine D. Seelman & Bob Silverstein (1990). Impact of Legislation on Availability and Use of Technology by Individuals with Disabilities. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 20 (3):34.
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