Search results for 'Ted Preston' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ted M. Preston & Scott Dixon (2007). Who Wants to Live Forever? Immortality, Authenticity, and Living Forever in the Present. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (2):99-117.
    Death is a bad thing by virtue of its ability to frustrate the subjectively valuable projects that shape our identities and render our lives meaningful. While the presumption that immortality would necessarily result in boredom worse than death proves unwarranted, if the constraint of mortality is a necessary element for virtues, relationships, and motivation to pursue our life-projects, then death might nevertheless be a necessary evil. Mortal or immortal, it’s clear that the value of one’s life depends on its subjectively (...)
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  2.  22
    Ted Preston (2004). Environmental Values, Pluralism, and Stability. Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (1 & 2):73 – 83.
    While an environmental ethic is not explicitly developed in A Theory of Justice, or Political Liberalism, it is possible to extrapolate some principles dealing with non-human nature, and thereby some environmental protections, with what Rawls provides. However, his inability to provide a non-anthropocentric environmental ethic might threaten the stability of a 'well-ordered' society, and this possibility gestures to the potential 'problem' of pluralism in general. Certain environmentalists will be dissatisfied with the status of their environmental values in a Rawlsian society. (...)
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  3.  65
    Ted M. Preston (2003). The Stoic Samurai. Asian Philosophy 13 (1):39 – 52.
    In Philosophy as a Way of Life, Pierre Hadot discusses the understanding of philosophy held by the Greco-Roman ancients. Philosophy was not understood only as an exegetical or analytical exercise, but as a spiritual practice - a way of life. Becoming a member of a philosophical school was tantamount to a religious conversion involving one's entire self. To make one's doctrines 'ready to hand' required a number of 'spiritual exercises' which, if regularly followed, were intended to evince such a transformation. (...)
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  4.  18
    Ted Preston (2006). The Private and Public Appeal of Self-Fashioning. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 31 (1):10-19.
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  5.  4
    Christopher J. Preston (2007). Wayne Ouderkirkand Christopher J. Preston. In Christopher J. Preston and Wayne Ouderkirk (ed.), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, Iii. Springer 8.
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  6. Diana Preston (2005). Before the Fall-Out: The Human Chain Reaction From Marie Curie to Hiroshima. Doubleday.
    A history of the Atomic Bomb from Marie Curie to Hiroshima. “I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds” — Oppenheimer quoting the Bhagavad Gita after witnessing the successful demonstration of the atom bomb. The bomb, which killed an estimated 140,000 civilians in Hiroshima and destroyed the countryside for miles around, was one of the defining moments in world history. That mushroom cloud cast a terrifying shadow over the contemporary world and continues to do so today. But how could this (...)
     
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  7. Beth Preston (2013). A Philosophy of Material Culture: Action, Function, and Mind. Routledge.
    This book focuses on material culture as a subject of philosophical inquiry and promotes the philosophical study of material culture by articulating some of the central and difficult issues raised by this topic and providing innovative solutions to them, most notably an account of improvised action and a non-intentionalist account of function in material culture. Preston argues that material culture essentially involves activities of production and use; she therefore adopts an action-theoretic foundation for a philosophy of material culture. Part (...)
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  8. Beth Preston (2016). A Philosophy of Material Culture: Action, Function, and Mind. Routledge.
    This book focuses on material culture as a subject of philosophical inquiry and promotes the philosophical study of material culture by articulating some of the central and difficult issues raised by this topic and providing innovative solutions to them, most notably an account of improvised action and a non-intentionalist account of function in material culture. Preston argues that material culture essentially involves activities of production and use; she therefore adopts an action-theoretic foundation for a philosophy of material culture. Part (...)
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  9. Stephanie Preston & Alicia J. Hofelich (2012). The Many Faces of Empathy: Parsing Emathic Phenomena Through a Proximate, Dynamic-Systems View Reprsenting the Other in the Self. Emotion Review 4 (1):24-33.
    A surfeit of research confirms that people activate personal, affective, and conceptual representations when perceiving the states of others. However, researchers continue to debate the role of self–other overlap in empathy due to a failure to dissociate neural overlap, subjective resonance, and personal distress. A perception–action view posits that neural-level overlap is necessary during early processing for all social understanding, but need not be conscious or aversive. This neural overlap can subsequently produce a variety of states depending on the context (...)
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  10.  56
    Stephanie D. Preston & Frans B. M. de Waal (2001). Empathy: Its Ultimate and Proximate Bases. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):1-20.
    There is disagreement in the literature about the exact nature of the phenomenon of empathy. There are emotional, cognitive, and conditioning views, applying in varying degrees across species. An adequate description of the ultimate and proximate mechanism can integrate these views. Proximately, the perception of an object's state activates the subject's corresponding representations, which in turn activate somatic and autonomic responses. This mechanism supports basic behaviors that are crucial for the reproductive success of animals living in groups. The Perception-Action Model, (...)
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  11. R. Preston (1994). Veritatis Splendor: A Comment. Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (2):38-42.
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  12.  16
    Beth Preston (2012). A Philosophy of Material Culture: Action, Function, and Mind. Routledge.
    This book focuses on material culture as a subject of philosophical inquiry and promotes the philosophical study of material culture by articulating some of the central and difficult issues raised by this topic and providing innovative solutions to ...
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  13.  24
    Lee E. Preston & Douglas P. O’Bannon (1997). The Corporate Social-Financial Performance Relationship. Business and Society 36 (4):419-429.
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  14. John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.) (2002). Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press.
    The most famous challenge to computational cognitive science and artificial intelligence is the philosopher John Searle's "Chinese Room" argument.
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  15.  99
    Beth Preston (1998). Why is a Wing Like a Spoon? A Pluralist Theory of Function. Journal of Philosophy 95 (5):215-254.
    Function theorists routinely speculate that a viable function theory will be equally applicable to biological traits and artifacts. However, artifact function has received only the most cursory scrutiny in its own right. Closer scrutiny reveals that only a pluralist theory comprising two distinct notions of function--proper function and system function--will serve as an adequate general theory. The first section describes these two notions of function. The second section shows why both notions are necessary, by showing that attempts to do away (...)
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  16.  84
    R. Preston (1997). Christian Virtues in Medical Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):261-261.
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  17. John Preston (1997). Feyerabend: Philosophy, Science, and Society. Polity Press.
  18. R. Preston (1990). A Response To Ulrich Duchrow. Studies in Christian Ethics 3 (1):93-99.
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  19.  2
    Christopher J. Preston (2008). Synthetic Biology: Drawing a Line in Darwin's Sand. Environmental Values 17 (1):23 - 39.
    Maintaining the coherence of the distinction between nature and artefact has long been central to environmental thinking. By building genomes from scratch out of 'bio-bricks', synthetic biology promises to create biotic artefacts markedly different from anything created thus far in biotechnology. These new biotic artefacts depart from a core principle of Darwinian natural selection – descent through modification – leaving them with no causal connection to historical evolutionary processes. This departure from the core principle of Darwinism presents a challenge to (...)
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  20.  16
    Beth Preston (1998). Why Is a Wing Like a Spoon? A Pluralist Theory of Function. Journal of Philosophy 95 (5):215-254.
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  21.  31
    Andrew Bartlett & David Preston (2000). Can Ethical Behaviour Really Exist in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):199 - 209.
    Our soft survey reveals that the assumption underlying much of the business ethics literature -- that the conduct of business can and ought to support the social good -- is not accepted within the workplace. This paper considers an apparent dichotomy, with companies investing in ethical programs whose worth their employees and managers question. We examine the relationship between work, bureaucracy and "the market" and conclude that employees often question the existence of business ethics because there is no good and (...)
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  22.  45
    Stephanie D. Preston & Alicia J. Hofelich (2012). Author Reply: Understanding Empathy by Modeling Rather Than Organizing Its Contents. Emotion Review 4 (1):38-39.
    Perception–action approaches are sometimes criticized because empathy takes cognitive forms and people do not overtly imitate or feel all observed states. These complaints reflect a misunderstanding of the framework, which we tried to clarify through a review that bridged social and neuroscientific views. Far from “simple fixes,” these misunderstandings appear to reflect deeply rooted differences in the way that each discipline conceptualizes science and the mind. We address the important points made by the commentators and reiterate the need to incorporate (...)
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  23. S. Tolver Preston (1901). Reply to Mr. Herbert Spencer's Note in "Mind," January, 1901. Mind 10 (39):434-435.
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  24.  71
    Aaron Preston (2005). Quality Instances and the Structure of the Concrete Particular. Axiomathes 15 (2):267-292.
    In this paper, I examine a puzzle that emerges from what J. P. Moreland has called the traditional realist view of quality instances. Briefly put, the puzzle is to figure out how quality instances fit into the overall structure of a concrete particular, given that the traditional realist view of quality instances prima facie seems incompatible with what might be called the traditional realist view of concrete particulars. After having discussed the traditional realist views involved and the puzzle that emerges (...)
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  25.  10
    Christopher J. Preston (2011). Re-Thinking the Unthinkable: Environmental Ethics and the Presumptive Argument Against Geoengineering. Environmental Values 20 (4):457 - 479.
    The rapid rise in interest in geoengineering the climate as a response to global warming presents a clear and significant challenge to environmental ethics. The paper articulates what I call the 'presumptive argument' against geoengineering from environmental ethics, a presumption strong enough to make geoengineering almost 'unthinkable' from within that tradition. Two rationales for suspending that presumption are next considered. One of them is a 'lesser evil' argument, the other makes connections between the presumptive argument, ecofacism, and the anthropocentrism/non-anthropocentrism debate. (...)
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  26.  22
    Beth Preston (2003). Of Marigold Beer: A Reply to Vermaas and Houkes. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (4):601-612.
    Vermaas and Houkes advance four desiderata for theories of artifact function, and classify such theories into non-intentionalist reproduction theories on the one hand and intentionalist non-reproduction theories on the other. They argue that non-intentionalist reproduction theories fail to satisfy their fourth desideratum. They maintain that only an intentionalist non-reproduction theory can satisfy all the desiderata, and they offer a version that they believe does satisfy all of them. I reply that intentionalist non-reproduction theories, including their version, fail to satisfy their (...)
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  27.  11
    John Preston, Paul Feyerabend. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  28. R. Preston (1994). Book Review : The Enterprise Culture, by Peter Sedgwick. London, SPCK,1992. Viii + 197pp. 15. Is There a Gospel for the Rich? Tlre Christian in a Capitalist World, by Richard Harries. London, Mowbray, 1992. 182pp. 12.99. What Does the Lord Require? How American Christians Thinkabout Ecoi Ioni Ic Justice, by Stephen Hart. Oxford University Press,1992. 253pp. 22.50. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 7 (1):115-118.
  29.  14
    Catherine Preston & Roger Newport (2010). Self-Denial and the Role of Intentions in the Attribution of Agency. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):986-998.
    The ability to distinguish between our own actions and those of an external agent is a fundamental component of normal human social interaction. Both low- and high-level mechanisms are thought to contribute to the sense of movement agency, but the contribution of each is yet to be fully understood. By applying small and incremental perturbations to realistic visual feedback of the limb, the influence of high-level action intentions and low-level motor predictive mechanisms were dissociated in two experiments. In the first, (...)
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  30. R. Preston (1995). A Response To Nigel Biggar and Donald Hay's the Bible, Christian Ethics and the Provision of Social Security. Studies in Christian Ethics 8 (2):92-95.
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  31.  10
    Christopher Preston, Maxim Sheinin, Denyse Sproat & Vimal Swarup (2010). The Novelty of Nano and the Regulatory Challenge of Newness. NanoEthics 4 (1):13-26.
    A great deal has been made of the question of whether nano-materials provide a unique set of ethical challenges. Equally important is the question of whether they provide a unique set of regulatory challenges. In the last 18 months, the US Environmental Protection Agency has begun the process of trying to meet the regulatory challenge of nano using the Toxic Substances Control Act (1976)(TSCA). In this central piece of legislation, ‘newness’ is a critical concept. Current EPA policy, we argue, does (...)
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  32.  2
    Christopher J. Preston (2001). Intrinsic Value and Care: Making Connections Through Ecological Narratives. Environmental Values 10 (2):243 - 263.
    Vitriolic debates between supporters of the intrinsic value and the care approaches to environmental ethics make it sound as though these two sides share no common ground. Yet ecofeminist Jim Cheney holds up Holmes Rolston's work as a paragon of feminist sensibility. I explore where Cheney gets this idea from and try to root out some potential connections between intrinsic value and care approaches. The common ground is explored through Alasdair Maclntyre's articulation of a narrative ethics and the development of (...)
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  33.  19
    Noel Preston (2001). Understanding Ethics. Federation Press.
    Understanding Ethics introduces the frameworks of moral philosophy to analyse contemporary moral issues and perennial human dilemmas.While the early chapters ...
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  34.  39
    Beth Preston (1998). Cognition and Tool Use. Mind and Language 13 (4):513–547.
    Tool use rivals language as an important domain of cognitive phenomena, and so as a source of insight into the nature of cognition in general. But the favoured current definition of tool use is inadequate because it does not carve the phenomena of interest at the joints. Heidegger's notion of equipment provides a more adequate theoretical framework. But Heidegger's account leads directly to a non-individualist view of the nature of cognition. Thus non-individualism is supported by concrete considerations about the nature (...)
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  35.  15
    Christopher J. Preston (2012). Beyond the End of Nature: SRM and Two Tales of Artificity for the Anthropocene. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (2):188 - 201.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 188-201, June 2012.
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  36.  43
    H. J. Glock & John M. Preston (1995). Externalism and First-Person Authority. The Monist 78 (4):515-33.
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  37.  11
    Beth Preston (1996). Merleau-Ponty and Feminine Embodied Existence. Man and World 29 (2):167-186.
  38.  14
    John Preston (1997). Feyerabend's Retreat From Realism. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):431.
    In attempting to assess the legacy of Paul Feyerabend's philosophical work, matters are complicated by the fact that there was a change in his basic orientation towards the philosophy of science around the end of the 1960s. Here I shall indicate one aspect of Feyerabend's divided legacy. My main aims are to sketch the principal themes in his (fairly extensive but little-known) 1990s output, to situate that later output insofar as it bears on the realism/antirealism debate, and (rather precipitously, perhaps) (...)
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  39.  74
    John Preston (2003). Kuhn, Instrumentalism, and the Progress of Science. Social Epistemology 17 (2-3):259-265.
  40.  75
    John Preston (1995). Has Poincaré's Conventionalism Been Refuted? Ratio 8 (2):193-200.
  41.  11
    Andrew Bartlett & David Seth Preston (2003). Not Nice, Not in Control. Philosophy of Management 3 (1):37-46.
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  42.  14
    John Preston (2004). Bird, Kuhn, and Positivism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):327-335.
    I challenge Alexander Bird’s contention that the divergence between Kuhn’s views and recent philosophy of science is a matter of Kuhn having taken a wrong turn. Bird is right to remind us of Kuhn’s naturalistic tendencies, but these are not clearly an asset, rather than a liability. Kuhn was right to steer clear of extreme referential conceptions of meaning, since these court an unacceptable semantic scepticism. Although he eschewed the concepts of truth and knowledge as philosophers of science have tended (...)
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  43.  24
    Robert A. Preston (1967). John Dewey. By Richard J. Bernstein. Modern Schoolman 45 (1):68-69.
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  44.  1
    Christopher J. Preston (2005). The Promise and Threat of Nanotechnology: Can Environmental Ethics Guide US? Hyle 11 (1):19 - 44.
    The growing presence of the products of nanotechnology in the public domain raises a number of ethical questions. This paper considers whether existing environmental ethics can provide some guidance on these questions. After a brief discussion of the appropriateness of an environmental ethics framework for the task at hand, the paper identifies a representative environmental ethic and uses it to evaluate four salient issues that emerge from nanotechnology. The discussion is intended both to give an initial theoretical take on nanotechnology (...)
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  45.  63
    Beth Preston (1993). Heidegger and Artificial Intelligence. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (1):43-69.
  46.  21
    Christopher J. Preston (1998). Epistemology and Intrinsic Values: Norton and Callicott's Critiques of Rolston. Environmental Ethics 20 (4):409-428.
    Debates over the existence of intrinsic value have long been central to professional environmental ethics. Holmes Rolston, III’s version of intrinsic value is, perhaps, the most well known. Recently, powerful critiques leveled by Bryan G. Norton and J. Baird Callicott have suggested that there is an epistemological problem with Rolston’s account. In this paper, I argue first that the debates over intrinsic value are as pertinent now as they have ever been. I then explain the objections that Norton and Callicott (...)
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  47.  15
    John M. Preston (ed.) (1998). Thought and Language. Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume, several major twentieth-century philosophers of mind and language make further contributions to the debate.
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  48.  75
    Beth Preston (1994). Behaviorism and Mentalism: Is There a Third Alternative? Synthese 100 (2):167-96.
    Behaviorism and mentalism are commonly considered to be mutually exclusive and conjunctively exhaustive options for the psychological explanation of behavior. Behaviorism and mentalism do differ in their characterization of inner causes of behavior. However, I argue that they are not mutually exclusive on the grounds that they share important foundational assumptions, two of which are the notion of an innerouter split and the notion of control. I go on to argue that mentalism and behaviorism are not conjunctively exhaustive either, on (...)
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  49.  24
    John Preston (2008). Hertz, Wittgenstein and Philosophical Method. Philosophical Investigations 31 (1):48–67.
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  50.  23
    Dominic Preston (2014). Some Ontology of Interactive Art. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):267-278.
    Lopes (2010) offers an account of computer art, which he argues is a new art form. Part of what makes computer art distinctive, according to Lopes, is its interactivity, a quality found in few non-computer artworks. Given the rise in prominence of such artworks, most notably videogames, they are surely worthy of philosophical inquiry. I believe their ontology and properties are particularly worthy of study, as an understanding of these will prove crucial to critical understanding and evaluation of the works (...)
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