Search results for 'Teleology History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. István Mészáros (2008). Dialectical Transformations : Teleology, History and Social Consciousness. In Bertell Ollman & Tony Smith (eds.), Dialectics for the New Century. Palgrave Macmillan. 417 - 433.score: 156.0
    In Marxism, the material base of society is responsible for a number of structural restraints on the appearance, functioning, and evolution of the superstructure. At the same time, the superstructure, too, and especially ideology, exercises considerable influence on developments in the base, and in certain conditions can prove decisive in transforming the relations that constitute the base. While history is radically open ended and, therefore, nothing is absolutely certain, knowledge of such conditions is a necessary first step toward a (...)
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  2. Ernest Nagel (1979). Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science. Columbia University Press.score: 132.0
     
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  3. Larry Krasnoff (1994). The Fact of Politics: History and Teleology in Kant1,2. European Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):22-40.score: 120.0
  4. Kevin E. Dodson (1994). Teleology and Mechanism in Kant's Philosophy of History. Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (1):157-165.score: 120.0
  5. Jeffrey Johnson (1983). Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science. International Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):100-101.score: 120.0
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  6. Francisco Conde (2013). Three Periods in Husserl's Study of Teleology: Evidence and Systematicity in the Theory of Knowledge, Ethical Renewal and Reason in History. Pensamiento 69 (259):233-256.score: 120.0
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  7. N. Sedley David (2008). Socrates' Place in the History of Teleology. Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 29 (2):317-336.score: 120.0
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  8. M. Roesner (2005). Limes and Morphe. On the Problem of the Teleology of Philosophical History in the Thinking of Edmund Husserl. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 112 (1).score: 120.0
  9. Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Biological Conception of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):1-28.score: 110.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that Kant's philosophy of biology has crucial implications for our understanding of his philosophy of history, and that overlooking these implications leads to a fundamental misconstruction of his views. More precisely, I will show that Kant's philosophy of history is modelled on his philosophy of biology due to the fact that the development of the human species shares a number of peculiar features with the functioning of organisms, these features entailing (...)
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  10. Peter McLaughlin (1990). Kant's Critique of Teleology in Biological Explanation: Antinomy and Teleology. E. Mellen Press.score: 90.0
  11. Monte Ransome Johnson (2005). Aristotle on Teleology. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Aristotle's has been the most influential philosophy in the whole history of science. Monte Johnson examines its most controversial aspect: Aristotle's emphasis on the importance of goals and purposes to scientific understanding--his teleology. In some cases this policy has proved deeply flawed, for example in his earth-centric cosmology, or his anthropology purporting to justify slavery and male domination. But in many areas Aristotle's teleology has been successful, and remains influential, for example in adaptationist evolutionary theory, embryology, and (...)
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  12. Robert C. Koons (1998). Teleology as Higher-Order Causation: A Situation-Theoretic Account. Minds and Machines 8 (4):559-585.score: 66.0
    Situation theory, as developed by Barwise and his collaborators, is used to demonstrate the possibility of defining teleology (and related notions, like that of proper or biological function) in terms of higher order causation, along the lines suggested by Taylor and Wright. This definition avoids the excessive narrowness that results from trying to define teleology in terms of evolutionary history or the effects of natural selection. By legitimating the concept of teleology, this definition also provides promising (...)
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  13. William Joseph FitzPatrick (2000). Teleology and the Norms of Nature. Garland Pub..score: 66.0
    This work is an examination of teleological attributions (i.e. ascriptions of proper functions and natural ends) to the features and behavior of living things, with a view ultimately to understanding their application to human life and the significance they may or may not have for an understanding of human nature and values. The author argues that such teleological attributions do indeed apply to living things, including human beings, and that this sheds substantial light on what living things are; interestingly, it (...)
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  14. Dun Zhang (2010). “The End of History ” and the Fate of the Philosophy of History. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):631-651.score: 66.0
    The end of history by Fukuyama is mainly based on Hegel’s treatise of the end of history and Kojeve’s corresponding interpretation. But Hegel’s end of history is a purely philosophical question, i.e., an ontological premise that must be fulfilled to complete absolute knowledge. When Kojeve further demonstrates its universal and homogeneous state, Fukuyama extends it into a political view: The victory of the Western system of freedom and democracy marks the end of the development of human (...) and Marxist theory and practice. This is a misunderstanding of Hegel. Marx analyzes, scientifically, the historical limitation of Western capitalism and maintains, by way of a kind of revolutionary teleology, the expectation of and belief in human liberation, which is the highest historical goal. His philosophy of history is hence characterized by theoretical elements from both historical scientificalness and historical teleology. (shrink)
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  15. Marjorie Grene (2004). The Philosophy of Biology: An Episodic History. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    Is life different from the non-living? If so, how? And how, in that case, does biology as the study of living things differ from other sciences? These questions are traced through an exploration of episodes in the history of biology and philosophy. The book begins with Aristotle, then moves on to Descartes comparing his position with that of Harvey. In the eighteenth century the authors consider Buffon and Kant. In the nineteenth century the authors examine the Cuvier-Geoffroy debate, pre-Darwinian (...)
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  16. Jeffrey Bernstein (2004). Philosophy of History as the History of Philosophy in Schelling's System of Transcendental Idealism. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):233-254.score: 60.0
    Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism is usually considered to be either (1) an early Fichtean-influenced work that gives little insight into Schelling’s philosophy or (2) a text focusing on self-consciousness and aesthetics. I argue that Schelling’s System develops a subtle conception of history which originates in a dialogue with Kant and Hegel (concerning the question of teleology) and concludes in proximity to an Idealist version of Spinoza. In this way, Schelling develops a philosophy of history which is, (...)
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  17. Alan Donagan (1985). Human Ends and Human Actions: An Exploration in St. Thomas's Treatment. Marquette University Press.score: 60.0
  18. Robert H. Hurlbutt (1965). Hume, Newton, and the Design Argument. Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press.score: 60.0
  19. George F. Held (1995). Aristotle's Teleological Theory of Tragedy and Epic. Winter.score: 58.0
  20. Allan Gotthelf (2012). Teleology, First Principles, and Scientific Method in Aristotle's Biology. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    This volume presents an interconnected set of sixteen essays, four of which are previously unpublished, by Allan Gotthelf--one of the leading experts in the study of Aristotle's biological writings. Gotthelf addresses three main topics across Aristotle's three main biological treatises. Starting with his own ground-breaking study of Aristotle's natural teleology and its illuminating relationship with the Generation of Animals, Gotthelf proceeds to the axiomatic structure of biological explanation (and the first principles such explanation proceeds from) in the Parts of (...)
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  21. Michael Lamport Commons & Sara Nora Ross (2008). The Hierarchical Complexity View of Evolution and History. World Futures 64 (5 - 7):399 – 405.score: 54.0
    Evolution means different things at different stages of development. Higher stage explanations for it are downward assimilated at lower stages. Different scientific explanations for evolution also reflect different stages of development. Hierarchical complexity of tasks in evolution is a behavioral analytic explanation. It is selection processes of various kinds in tandem with changes in selection tasks' orders of hierarchical complexity. There is neither teleology nor evolutionary favoring of the highest stages of performance. Selection tasks at higher orders of complexity (...)
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  22. Shojiro Kotegawa (2008). Epoché and Teleology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:41-48.score: 54.0
    In Husserl’s phenomenology, there are two essential moments; one is the Epoché which makes the phenomenology possible, the other is the teleology of science which directs it to its own goal (telos). The former, later appeared in Husserl’s text, does not seem quite consistent with the latter – on the contrary, theseseem so exclusive that a question arises as to whether Husserl could reconcile Epoché with teleology consistently claimed from the beginning of his career. My aim in this (...)
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  23. Martin Kurthen (1994). Ahistorical Intentional Content. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 25 (2):241 - 259.score: 54.0
    One of the main problems of current theory of intentionality concerns the possibility of ahistorical intentional content, that is, content in the absence of any developmental history of the respective item. Biosemanticists like Millikan (1984) argue that content is essentially historical, while computationalists like Cummins (1989) hold that a system's current ahistorical state alone determines content. In the present paper, this problem is discussed in terms of some popular 'cosmic accident' thought experiments, and the conceptual framework of these experiments (...)
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  24. Cheryl A. Logan (2002). Before There Were Standards: The Role of Test Animals in the Production of Empirical Generality in Physiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):329 - 363.score: 54.0
    After 1900, the selective breeding of a few standard animals for research in the life sciences changed the way science was done. Among the pervasive changes was a transformation in scientists' assumptions about relationship between diversity and generality. Examination of the contents of two prominent physiology journals between 1885 and 1900, reveals that scientists used a diverse array of organisms in empirical research. Experimental physiologists gave many reasons for the choice of test animals, some practical and others truly comparative. (...)
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  25. Andrea Zhok (2011). History as Therapy of Tradition in Husserl's Thought. Studia Phaenomenologica 11 (1):29-54.score: 54.0
    The article aims at bringing to light the internal necessity that shapes Husserl’s concern with the issues of history and tradition. After discussing the role played by the teleology of reason and by genetic constitution in preparing the ground for Husserl’s reflection on the historical dimension, we specifically dwell on the idea of tradition. Tradition appears both as a hindrance in our pursuit of truth, and as an indispensable sense-bestowing factor. Against this ambivalent background, history emerges as (...)
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  26. Julia Jorati (forthcoming). Three Types of Spontaneity and Teleology in Leibniz. Journal of the History of Philosophy.score: 54.0
    Leibniz holds that all substances are spontaneous, that is, that all states of a given substance originate within it. Several commentators distinguish two kinds of spontaneity. This paper sharpens and expands this distinction by arguing that we need to distinguish not just two, but three types of spontaneity. This in turn sheds light on Leibniz’s otherwise puzzling views on teleology. The paper argues that there is an intimate connection between spontaneity and teleology and that a type of (...) corresponds to each type of spontaneity. Making these distinctions can help us understand, among other things, how Leibniz can account for significant differences between different types of actions while maintaining that all monadic activity is teleological and spontaneous. (shrink)
     
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  27. Kyoung-Jae Kim (2008). On the Formative Elements of the Spiral View of History in Ham's Ssial Thought. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:351-357.score: 54.0
    The metaphorical understanding of historical movement as spiral is due to the symbolism of the spiral. Spiral is the geometric pattern to depict a self-accumulative growth of energy or life force. For Ham, history neither reiterates “the eternal return” to the primal archetype nor generates “the unilateral straight move of teleology. If history is a living move, it should follow the basic principle of life evolution as all the living experiences the gradual and yet creative advance by (...)
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  28. Oscar Lucas González Castán (1995). William Alston: Sobre la percepción sensible y otras percepciones. Logos 29 (1):47-72.score: 54.0
    In this essay I shall analyze same main ideas that, from the Enlightenment onwards, have been defended about the relationships between individuals and history. According to these relationships it is always possible to coordinate the aims of particular people with universal aims. I shall also study some theories that imply the collapse of this approach.
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  29. William Dembski (2006). In Defence of Intelligent Design. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oup Oxford. 715-731.score: 48.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712271; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 715-731.; Physical Description: il ; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 728-731.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  30. Robert T. Pennock (2006). The Premodern Sins of Intelligent Design. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oup Oxford. 732-747.score: 48.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712273; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 732-747.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 746-748.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  31. W. B. Provine (2006). Evolution, Religion, and Science. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. 667--80.score: 48.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712266; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 667-680.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 679-680.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  32. Vittorio Morfino (2008). Causa Sui or Wechselwirkung: Engels Between Spinoza and Hegel. Historical Materialism 16 (1):9-35.score: 48.0
  33. Enzo Traverso (2011). Marx, l'histoire et les historiens. Une relation à réinventer. Actuel Marx 2 (2):153-165.score: 48.0
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  34. Oscar Lucas González Castán (1992). Intencionalidad sin conciencia: Brentano, Searle y las ciencias cognitivas. Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 7 (2):99-118.score: 48.0
    In this paper, I shall argue that both cognitivism and liberal contractualism defend a pre-moral conception of human desire that has its origin in the Hobbesian and Humean tradition that both theories share. Moreover, the computational and syntactic themes in cognitive science support the notion, which Gauthier evidently shares, that the human mind – or, in Gauthier’s case, the mind of “economic man” – is a purely formal mechanism, characterized by logical and mathematical operations. I shall conclude that a single (...)
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  35. Benjamin Noys (2009). Ends in Sight: Marx/Fukuyama/Hobsbawm/Anderson. Historical Materialism 17 (4):157-163.score: 48.0
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  36. Józef Bańka (1994). Tract on Time: Time in the Conceptions of Recentivism and Presentism. Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Śląskiego.score: 48.0
     
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  37. José María Artola Barrenechea (2002). Universalidad y sociabilidad: Comentario a un texto kantiano. Logos 35 (5):183-191.score: 48.0
    Este ensayo pretende abordar de nuevo el conocido símil de la línea para extraer de él su significado político, situándolo en su contexto: un diálogo en que se pregunta por la justicia. Pero trata a la vez de interpretar la pregunta por la justicia como una cuestión que no es meramente moral o política, sino decididamente ontológica: la pregunta por aquello que hace posible toda delimitación y todo discernimiento. El lugar en que confluyen ambos asuntos no es otro que la (...)
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  38. Estela Fernández Nadal (2005). Memoria, identidad, poder. Francisco Bilbao y las filosofías de la historia de los vencedores. Polis 12.score: 48.0
    La figura del chileno Francisco Bilbao (1823-1865), como pensador americanista y crítico de las filosofías de la historia eurocentristas, constituye el hilo central de este análisis. La autora expone los elementos claves de la crítica de Bilbao respecto de los sistemas de pensamiento que promueven una aceptación pasiva del pasado y el presente como un designio de la Providencia o bien del Progreso. Se develan las lógicas que existen tras las distintas versiones de la filosofía de la historia, como teoría (...)
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  39. Jean-François Lyotard (1994). Lessons on the Analytic of the Sublime: Kant's Critique of Judgment, [Sections] 23-29. Stanford University Press.score: 48.0
    Philosophical aesthetics have seen an amazing revival over the past decade, as a radical questioning of the very grounds of Western epistemology has revealed that descriptions of what used to be seen as specific to aesthetic experience can instead be viewed as a general model for human cognition. In this revival, no text in the classical corpus of Western philosophy has been more frequently discussed and debated than the dense, complex paragraphs inserted into Kant's Critique of Judgment as sections 23-29: (...)
     
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  40. Stuart Peterfreund (2012). Turning Points in Natural Theology From Bacon to Darwin: The Way of the Argument From Design. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 48.0
  41. Silvia Pierosara (2011). Asking for Narratives to Be Recognized: The Moral of Histories. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 2 (1):70-83.score: 46.0
    This paper demonstrates an implicit connection between narrativity and recognition in the work of Paul Ricœur. This view is developed in three steps. First, it shows that the subject who calls for recognition demands that his or her own narrative be recognized. In order to be recognized, a story must be measured with history , particularly that of the victims. Second, from this perspective, the role of collective narratives is fundamental, because they represent the possibility to connect the intrinsic (...)
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  42. Theodore R. Schatzki (2010). The Timespace of Human Activity: On Performance, Society, and History as Indeterminate Teleological Events. Lexington Books.score: 44.0
    The Timespace of Human Activity shows that a concept of activity timespace drawn from the work of Martin Heidegger Provides new insights into the nature of ...
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  43. Joseph Margolis (2011). Toward a Theory of Human History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):245-273.score: 42.0
    I show the sense in which the concept of history as a human science affects our theory of the natural sciences and, therefore, our theory of the unity of the physical and human sciences. The argument proceeds by way of reviewing the effect of the Darwinian contribution regarding teleologism and of post-Darwinian paleonanthropology on the transformation of the primate members of Homo sapiens into societies of historied selves. The strategy provides a novel way of recovering the unity of the (...)
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  44. Marcel Quarfood (2006). Kant on Biological Teleology: Towards a Two-Level Interpretation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (4):735-747.score: 42.0
    Kant stresses the regulative status of teleological attributions, but sometimes he seems to treat teleology as a constitutive condition for biology. To clarify this issue, the concept of natural purpose and its role for biology are examined. I suggest that the concept serves an identificatory function: it singles out objects as natural purposes, whereby the special science of biology is constituted. This relative constitutivity of teleology is explicated by means of a distinction of levels: on the object level (...)
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  45. Robert J. Richards (2004). Michael Ruse's Design for Living. Journal of the History of Biology 37 (1):25 - 38.score: 42.0
    The eminent historian and philosopher of biology, Michael Ruse, has written several books that explore the relationship of evolutionary theory to its larger scientific and cultural setting. Among the questions he has investigated are: Is evolution progressive? What is its epistemological status? Most recently, in "Darwin and Design: Does Evolution have a Purpose?," Ruse has provided a history of the concept of teleology in biological thinking, especially in evolutionary theorizing. In his book, he moves quickly from Plato and (...)
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  46. Morton Beckner (1969). Function and Teleology. Journal of the History of Biology 2 (1):151 - 164.score: 42.0
    The view of teleology sketched in the above remarks seems to me to offer a piece of candy to both the critics and guardians of teleology. The critics want to defend against a number of things: the importation of unverifiable theological or metaphysical doctrines into the sciences; the idea that goals somehow act in favor of their won realization; and the view that biological systems require for their study concepts and patterns of explanation unlike anything employed in the (...)
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  47. Craig Martin (2010). The Ends of Weather: Teleology in Renaissance Meteorology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):259-282.score: 42.0
    The Divide between the prominence of final causes in Aristotelian natural philosophy and the rejection or severe limitation of final causation as an acceptable explanation of the natural world by figures such as Bacon, Descartes, and Spinoza during the seventeenth century has been considered a distinguishing mark between pre-modern and modern science.1 Admittedly, proponents of the mechanical and corpuscular philosophies of the seventeenth century were not necessarily stark opponents of teleology. Pierre Gassendi and Robert Boyle endorsed teleology, Leibniz (...)
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  48. Donald Loose (ed.) (2012). The Sublime and its Teleology: Kant, German Idealism, Phenomenology. Brill.score: 42.0
    Based on their critical analysis of Kant's "Critique of Judgment", the authors of this book show from different perspectives in what way the Kantian concept of the sublime is still a main stream of inspiration for contemporary thinking.
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  49. Griffin Trotter (2004). Loyalty in the Trenches: Practical Teleology for Office Clinicians Responding to Terrorism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4):389 – 416.score: 42.0
    Were terrorists ever to effectively deploy weapons of mass destruction, medical practice would be quickly transformed. Many ordinary clinicians would be asked or required to treat unfamiliar yet serious medical conditions in a setting of overwhelming urgency and impossible odds. Clinical focus would shift from doing good things for a succession of individual patients to considering many patients at once, a change that could beget loss of trust and rapport with patients. Clinicians might also experience restrictions in personal liberties and (...)
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  50. Faye Marie Getz (1991). Black Death and the Silver Lining: Meaning, Continuity, and Revolutionary Change in Histories of Medieval Plague. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 24 (2):265 - 289.score: 40.0
    The tension between the advocates of the Black Death as the herald of a new age, and those who see plague as proof of the resiliency of medieval mentalities, is rapidly dissolving. The conflict/resolution model, with its overtones of teleology, progress, and Naturphilosophie, is proving less useful to historians of epidemiology than one emphasizing continuity, gradual change, and the stoicism of the ordinary person. Historians of the plague are gravitating more and more to an intensive study of the local (...)
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