Search results for 'Teleology History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    István Mészáros (2008). Dialectical Transformations : Teleology, History and Social Consciousness. In Bertell Ollman & Tony Smith (eds.), Science and Society. Palgrave Macmillan 417 - 433.
    In Marxism, the material base of society is responsible for a number of structural restraints on the appearance, functioning, and evolution of the superstructure. At the same time, the superstructure, too, and especially ideology, exercises considerable influence on developments in the base, and in certain conditions can prove decisive in transforming the relations that constitute the base. While history is radically open ended and, therefore, nothing is absolutely certain, knowledge of such conditions is a necessary first step toward a (...)
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  2.  19
    Ernest Nagel (1979). Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science. Columbia University Press.
  3.  2
    Burleigh Wilkins (1966). Teleology in Kant's Philosophy of History. History and Theory 5 (2):172-185.
    Kant's teleological principle is a regulative, not a constitutive, principle of reason, ordering but not creating the understanding's concepts of objects. The principle is both heuristic for suggesting explanations in terms of efficient causality and a reminder of such explanations' insufficiency. But Kant states the rough content as well as the existence of an historical pattern. Reason and understanding and philosophy and science are analogously related. Since historians disagree over which, if any, principles are used in explanations, reason, represented by (...)
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  4. David Hull (1980). Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science by Ernest Nagel. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 71:656-657.
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  5.  15
    Larry Krasnoff (1994). The Fact of Politics: History and Teleology in Kant1,2. European Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):22-40.
  6.  20
    Kevin E. Dodson (1994). Teleology and Mechanism in Kant's Philosophy of History. Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (1):157-165.
  7. N. Sedley David (2008). Socrates' Place in the History of Teleology. Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 29 (2):317-336.
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  8.  3
    Patrick Suppes (1980). Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science by Ernest Nagel. Journal of Philosophy 77 (12):820-824.
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  9.  10
    Jeffrey Johnson (1983). Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science. International Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):100-101.
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  10. Bernard Baertschi (1981). "Ernest Nagel:" Teleology Revisited and Other Essays in the Philosophy and History of Science. [REVIEW] Studia Philosophica 40:239.
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  11. Francisco Conde (2013). Three Periods in Husserl's Study of Teleology: Evidence and Systematicity in the Theory of Knowledge, Ethical Renewal and Reason in History. Pensamiento 69 (259):233-256.
     
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  12. Richard V. De Smet (1962). Teleology and the Philosophy of History. International Philosophical Quarterly 2 (1 Supplement):157.
     
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  13. M. Roesner (2005). Limes and Morphe. On the Problem of the Teleology of Philosophical History in the Thinking of Edmund Husserl. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 112 (1).
  14. David N. Sedley (2008). Socrates’ Place in the History of Teleology. Elenchos 29 (2):317-336.
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  15. S. Strasser (1979). History, Teleology, and God in the Philosophy of Husserl. Analecta Husserliana 9:317.
     
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  16.  92
    Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Biological Conception of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):1-28.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that Kant's philosophy of biology has crucial implications for our understanding of his philosophy of history, and that overlooking these implications leads to a fundamental misconstruction of his views. More precisely, I will show that Kant's philosophy of history is modelled on his philosophy of biology due to the fact that the development of the human species shares a number of peculiar features with the functioning of organisms, these features entailing (...)
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  17. Peter McLaughlin (1990). Kant's Critique of Teleology in Biological Explanation: Antinomy and Teleology. E. Mellen Press.
  18.  74
    Katerina Deligiorgi (2014). Actions as Events and Vice Versa: Kant, Hegel and the Concept of History. In Fred Rush & Jürgen Stolzenberg (eds.), Internationales Jahrbuch des Deutschen Idealismus. De Gruyter 175-197.
    The aim of this paper is to show how concern with agency, expressed in the idea that history is the doing of agents, shapes both Kant’s and Hegel’s conceptions of history and, by extension, the roles they accord philosophical historiography.
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  19.  2
    David Carr (2016). Husserl and Foucault on the Historical Apriori: Teleological and Anti-Teleological Views of History. Continental Philosophy Review 49 (1):127-137.
    It is well known that Husserl and Foucault use the striking phrase “the historical apriori” at certain key points in their work. Yet most commentators agree that the two thinkers mean very different things by this expression, and the question is why these two authors would employ the same terms for such different purposes. Instead of pursuing this question directly I want to look from a broader perspective at the views of history that are reflected in the different uses (...)
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  20.  49
    Robert J. O'Hara (1992). Telling the Tree: Narrative Representation and the Study of Evolutionary History. Biology and Philosophy 7 (2): 135–160.
    Accounts of the evolutionary past have as much in common with works of narrative history as they do with works of science. Awareness of the narrative character of evolutionary writing leads to the discovery of a host of fascinating and hitherto unrecognized problems in the representation of evolutionary history, problems associated with the writing of narrative. These problems include selective attention, narrative perspective, foregrounding and backgrounding, differential resolution, and the establishment of a canon of important events. The narrative (...)
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  21.  7
    Robert J. O'Hara (2006). Essay-Review of Christian's 'Maps of Time: An Introduction to Big History'. [REVIEW] International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (1): 117–120.
    This well-written volume is an introduction, not to world history, but to the special genre of "Big History," as the subtitle indicates. Christian and his fellow big historians, reacting against popular scepticism toward "master narratives," seek to create a new class of grand works that incorporate not only the history of human society, but also of the Earth, its life, and the universe as a whole. Specialists in any of the fields covered by the volume may find (...)
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  22.  81
    Marco Solinas (2015). From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy: The Stamp of Inutility, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 (Pdf: Contents, Introduction). Palgrave Macmillan.
    Starting with Aristotle and moving on to Darwin, Marco Solinas outlines the basic steps from the birth, establishment and later rebirth of the traditional view of living beings, and its overturning by evolutionary revolution. The classic framework devised by Aristotle was still dominant in the 17th Century world of Galileo, Harvey and Ray, and remained hegemonic until the time of Lamarck and Cuvier in the 19th Century. Darwin's breakthrough thus takes on the dimensions of an abandonment of the traditional finalistic (...)
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  23.  4
    Enzo Traverso (2011). Marx, l'histoire et les historiens. Une relation à réinventer. Actuel Marx 2 (2):153-165.
    Historians don’t seem to be concerned by the “back to Marx” trend observed in many fields during the last decade. After an initial, very limited breakthrough in the inter-war years, Marxism irrupted in the academy in the 1960’s, when it established its hegemony on historical studies, merging with a multiplicity of social sciences. This “golden age” was followed by an epoch of decline, the climax of which was reached in 1989, with the fall of the Berlin’s wall. Since this turning (...)
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  24. Marjorie Grene (2004). The Philosophy of Biology: An Episodic History. Cambridge University Press.
    Is life different from the non-living? If so, how? And how, in that case, does biology as the study of living things differ from other sciences? These questions are traced through an exploration of episodes in the history of biology and philosophy. The book begins with Aristotle, then moves on to Descartes comparing his position with that of Harvey. In the eighteenth century the authors consider Buffon and Kant. In the nineteenth century the authors examine the Cuvier-Geoffroy debate, pre-Darwinian (...)
     
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  25. Monte Ransome Johnson (2005). Aristotle on Teleology. Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle's has been the most influential philosophy in the whole history of science. Monte Johnson examines its most controversial aspect: Aristotle's emphasis on the importance of goals and purposes to scientific understanding--his teleology. In some cases this policy has proved deeply flawed, for example in his earth-centric cosmology, or his anthropology purporting to justify slavery and male domination. But in many areas Aristotle's teleology has been successful, and remains influential, for example in adaptationist evolutionary theory, embryology, and (...)
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  26.  42
    William Joseph FitzPatrick (2000). Teleology and the Norms of Nature. Garland Pub..
    This work is an examination of teleological attributions (i.e. ascriptions of proper functions and natural ends) to the features and behavior of living things, with a view ultimately to understanding their application to human life and the significance they may or may not have for an understanding of human nature and values. The author argues that such teleological attributions do indeed apply to living things, including human beings, and that this sheds substantial light on what living things are; interestingly, it (...)
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  27.  54
    Robert C. Koons (1998). Teleology as Higher-Order Causation: A Situation-Theoretic Account. Minds and Machines 8 (4):559-585.
    Situation theory, as developed by Barwise and his collaborators, is used to demonstrate the possibility of defining teleology (and related notions, like that of proper or biological function) in terms of higher order causation, along the lines suggested by Taylor and Wright. This definition avoids the excessive narrowness that results from trying to define teleology in terms of evolutionary history or the effects of natural selection. By legitimating the concept of teleology, this definition also provides promising (...)
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  28.  38
    Dun Zhang (2010). The End of History ” and the Fate of the Philosophy of History”. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):631-651.
    The end of history by Fukuyama is mainly based on Hegel’s treatise of the end of history and Kojeve’s corresponding interpretation. But Hegel’s end of history is a purely philosophical question, i.e., an ontological premise that must be fulfilled to complete absolute knowledge. When Kojeve further demonstrates its universal and homogeneous state, Fukuyama extends it into a political view: The victory of the Western system of freedom and democracy marks the end of the development of human (...) and Marxist theory and practice. This is a misunderstanding of Hegel. Marx analyzes, scientifically, the historical limitation of Western capitalism and maintains, by way of a kind of revolutionary teleology, the expectation of and belief in human liberation, which is the highest historical goal. His philosophy of history is hence characterized by theoretical elements from both historical scientificalness and historical teleology. (shrink)
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  29. Monte Ransome Johnson (2008). Aristotle on Teleology. OUP Oxford.
    Aristotle's has been the most influential philosophy in the whole history of science. Monte Johnson examines its most controversial aspect: Aristotle's emphasis on the importance of goals and purposes to scientific understanding - his teleology.
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  30.  1
    Ian Hesketh (2015). The Recurrence of the Evolutionary Epic. Journal of the Philosophy of History 9 (2):196-219.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 196 - 219 In his 1978 On Human Nature, Edward Wilson defined the evolutionary epic as the scientific story of all life, a linear narrative beginning with the big bang and ending with the story of human history. Since that time several popular science writers have attempted to write that story of life producing such titles as The Universe Story and The Epic of Evolution. Historians have also gotten into the act under (...)
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  31.  90
    Tiberiu Popa (2007). Aristotle on Teleology. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):323-324.
    Tiberiu Popa - Aristotle on Teleology - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.2 323-324 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Tiberiu Popa Butler University Monte Ransome Johnson. Aristotle on Teleology. Oxford Aristotle Studies. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005. Pp. xi + 339 pp. Cloth, $74.00. Teleology is one of the most extensively studied topics in Aristotle's philosophy. It is all the more impressive that Monte Ransome Johnson (...)
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  32.  5
    Robert H. Hurlbutt (1965). Hume, Newton, and the Design Argument. Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press.
  33.  29
    Jeffrey Bernstein (2004). Philosophy of History as the History of Philosophy in Schelling's System of Transcendental Idealism. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):233-254.
    Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism is usually considered to be either (1) an early Fichtean-influenced work that gives little insight into Schelling’s philosophy or (2) a text focusing on self-consciousness and aesthetics. I argue that Schelling’s System develops a subtle conception of history which originates in a dialogue with Kant and Hegel (concerning the question of teleology) and concludes in proximity to an Idealist version of Spinoza. In this way, Schelling develops a philosophy of history which is, (...)
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  34.  2
    Maurice Mandelbaum (1967). A Note On History As Narrative. History and Theory 6 (3):413-419.
    The belief of Gallie, Danto, and others that history is constructing narratives is too simplistic and neglects the role of inquiry and discovery. Teleology in history - only events relevant to a known outcome find a place in a work -while similar to that in narratives is not decisive, since in any explanation the explicandum controls the explicans to some extent. History is not recounting a linear sequence of intelligible human actions but is an analysis of (...)
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  35.  7
    Henning Trüper (2014). Löwith, Löwith's Heidegger, and the Unity of History. History and Theory 53 (1):45-68.
    This article is about the problem of the unity of history as seen through the writings of Karl Löwith. By “unity of history” I understand the notion that all history constitutes one and only one range of kinds of objects and/or one field of knowledge. The article argues that the problem of the unity of history—though often neglected as a matter of mere argumentative infrastructure—is central to a number of wider problems, most prominently the possibility of (...)
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  36.  1
    Brian Garrett (2003). Vitalism and Teleology in the Natural Philosophy of Nehemiah Grew. British Journal for the History of Science 36 (1):63-81.
    This essay examines some aspects of the early history of the vitalism/mechanism controversies by examining the work of Nehemiah Grew in relation to that of Henry More , Francis Glisson and the more mechanistically inclined members of the Royal Society. I compliment and critically comment on John Henry's exploration of active principles in pre-Newtonian mechanist thought. The postulation of ‘active matter’ can be seen as an important support for the new experimental philosophy, but it has theological drawbacks, allowing for (...)
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  37.  2
    Jacob Neusner (1988). Judaic Uses of History in Talmudic Times. History and Theory 27:12-39.
    Talmudic history, understood as how events are organized and narrated to teach, cannot be said to deal with great affairs; it simply tells what those responsible for compiling it thought about the world around them. But if manifest history is scarcely present, a rich and complex world of latent history does lie ready at hand. The Talmud and related literature contain two sorts of historical information: stories about events within an estate of clerks, and data on the (...)
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  38. Alan Donagan (1985). Human Ends and Human Actions: An Exploration in St. Thomas's Treatment. Marquette University Press.
  39. Andreas Speer & Allgemeine Gesellschaft für Philosophie in Deutschland (2003). Anachronismen Tagung des Engeren Kreises der Allgemeinen Gesellschaft Für Philosophie in Deutschland Vom 3. Bis 6. Oktober 2001 in der Würzburger Residenz. [REVIEW]
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  40. Andrea Zhok (2011). History as Therapy of Tradition in Husserl's Thought. Studia Phaenomenologica 11 (1):29-54.
    The article aims at bringing to light the internal necessity that shapes Husserl’s concern with the issues of history and tradition. After discussing the role played by the teleology of reason and by genetic constitution in preparing the ground for Husserl’s reflection on the historical dimension, we specifically dwell on the idea of tradition. Tradition appears both as a hindrance in our pursuit of truth, and as an indispensable sense-bestowing factor. Against this ambivalent background, history emerges as (...)
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  41.  26
    Julia Jorati (2015). Three Types of Spontaneity and Teleology in Leibniz. Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):669-698.
    it is one of the central commitments of Leibniz’s mature metaphysics that all substances or monads possess perfect spontaneity, that is, that all states of a given monad originate within it.1 Created monads do not truly interact with each other, for Leibniz. Instead, each one produces all of its states single-handedly, requiring only God’s ordinary concurrence. Several commentators have pointed out that implicit in Leibniz’s view is a distinction between different types of spontaneity: a general type of spontaneity that (...)
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  42.  18
    Mary Louise Gill (2014). The Limits of Teleology in Aristotle's Meteorology IV.12. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (2):335-50.
    Meteorology IV.12, the final chapter of Aristotle’s “chemical” treatise, is a major text for the traditional view that Aristotle believed in universal teleology, the idea that everything in the cosmos—including the elements, earth, water, air, and fire—is what it is because of the goal or good it serves. But in the context of the rest of Meteorology IV, a different picture emerges. Meteorology IV.1–11 analyze the dispositional properties of material compounds (malleability, elasticity, etc.), examine the behavior of stuffs when (...)
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  43.  9
    Cheryl A. Logan (2002). Before There Were Standards: The Role of Test Animals in the Production of Empirical Generality in Physiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):329-363.
    After 1900, the selective breeding of a few standard animals for research in the life sciences changed the way science was done. Among the pervasive changes was a transformation in scientists' assumptions about relationship between diversity and generality. Examination of the contents of two prominent physiology journals between 1885 and 1900, reveals that scientists used a diverse array of organisms in empirical research. Experimental physiologists gave many reasons for the choice of test animals, some practical and others truly comparative. But, (...)
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  44.  12
    Kyoung-Jae Kim (2008). On the Formative Elements of the Spiral View of History in Ham's Ssial Thought. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:351-357.
    The metaphorical understanding of historical movement as spiral is due to the symbolism of the spiral. Spiral is the geometric pattern to depict a self-accumulative growth of energy or life force. For Ham, history neither reiterates “the eternal return” to the primal archetype nor generates “the unilateral straight move of teleology. If history is a living move, it should follow the basic principle of life evolution as all the living experiences the gradual and yet creative advance by (...)
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  45.  12
    Shojiro Kotegawa (2008). Epoché and Teleology. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:41-48.
    In Husserl’s phenomenology, there are two essential moments; one is the Epoché which makes the phenomenology possible, the other is the teleology of science which directs it to its own goal (telos). The former, later appeared in Husserl’s text, does not seem quite consistent with the latter – on the contrary, theseseem so exclusive that a question arises as to whether Husserl could reconcile Epoché with teleology consistently claimed from the beginning of his career. My aim in this (...)
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  46.  3
    Roberto de Andrade Martins (2014). A doutrina das causas finais na Antiguidade. 3. A teleologia na natureza, de Teofrasto a Galeno. Filosofia E Hist’Oria da Biologia 9 (1):79-120.
    This paper studies the history of teleological thought in Antiquity, after Aristotle, analyzing three relevant episodes: the contribution of Theophrastus – a companion and successor of Aristotle; Stoicism, as described by Cicero in his work On the nature of gods; and Galen’s anatomical and physiological works, especially his book On the utility of the parts of the human body. This analysis exhibits the broad diversity of views concerning final causes in Antiquity, all of them widely different from Aristotle’s one, (...)
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  47.  26
    Michael Lamport Commons & Sara Nora Ross (2008). The Hierarchical Complexity View of Evolution and History. World Futures 64 (5 - 7):399 – 405.
    Evolution means different things at different stages of development. Higher stage explanations for it are downward assimilated at lower stages. Different scientific explanations for evolution also reflect different stages of development. Hierarchical complexity of tasks in evolution is a behavioral analytic explanation. It is selection processes of various kinds in tandem with changes in selection tasks' orders of hierarchical complexity. There is neither teleology nor evolutionary favoring of the highest stages of performance. Selection tasks at higher orders of complexity (...)
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  48.  5
    A. Ia Flie (2003). Culture as the Meaning of History or the Grounding of Historical Culturology. Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (4):52-65.
    In joining a discussion of the subject, object, method, and other specifications of culturology, one should first define one's view of the correlation between culture and history, culturological and historical knowledge, the purposiveness of history as a social movement, and its certainty as a science. From the point of view of positivist philosophy and the social science based on it, history a priori lacks any teleology, goal-orientation, or inner meaning and is simply the sum of the (...)
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  49.  11
    Martin Kurthen (1994). Ahistorical Intentional Content. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 25 (2):241 - 259.
    One of the main problems of current theory of intentionality concerns the possibility of ahistorical intentional content, that is, content in the absence of any developmental history of the respective item. Biosemanticists like Millikan (1984) argue that content is essentially historical, while computationalists like Cummins (1989) hold that a system's current ahistorical state alone determines content. In the present paper, this problem is discussed in terms of some popular 'cosmic accident' thought experiments, and the conceptual framework of these experiments (...)
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  50. S. Clark Buckner (2004). Nothing, Perhaps? Nihilism, Psychoanalysis, and the Philosophy of History. Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    This dissertation examines Sigmund Freud's psychoanalysis with particular regard to the problem of nihilism, and the philosophy of history that Edmund Husserl and Georg Lukacs argue is needed in its wake to restore reason's capacity to give order and direction to human life. I understand nihilism not merely as the theory that life is devoid of value, but rather as an historical crisis in the sense of autonomy that results from the separation of fact and value in the thoroughly (...)
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