Search results for 'Temporality' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas Fuchs (2013). Temporality and Psychopathology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):75-104.score: 24.0
    The paper first introduces the concept of implicit and explicit temporality, referring to time as pre-reflectively lived vs. consciously experienced. Implicit time is based on the constitutive synthesis of inner time consciousness on the one hand, and on the conative–affective dynamics of life on the other hand. Explicit time results from an interruption or negation of implicit time and unfolds itself in the dimensions of present, past and future. It is further shown that temporality, embodiment and intersubjectivity are (...)
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  2. Richard Rice (2007). Trinity, Temporality, and Open Theism. Philosophia 35 (3-4):321-328.score: 24.0
    A number of thinkers today, including open theists, find reasons to attribute temporality to God. According to Robert W. Jenson, the Trinity is indispensable to a Christian concept of God, and divine temporality is essential to the meaning of the Trinity. Following the lead of early Christian thought, Jenson argues that the persons of the Trinity are relations, and these relations are temporal. Jenson’s insights are obscured, however, by problematic references to time as a sphere to which God (...)
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  3. David Morris (2008). Diabetes, Chronic Illness and the Bodily Roots of Ecstatic Temporality. Human Studies 31 (4):399 - 421.score: 24.0
    This article studies the phenomenology of chronic illness in light of phenomenology’s insights into ecstatic temporality and freedom. It shows how a chronic illness can, in lived experience, manifest itself as a disturbance of our usual relation to ecstatic temporality and thence as a disturbance of freedom. This suggests that ecstatic temporality is related to another sort of time—“provisional time”—that is in turn rooted in the body. The article draws on Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception and Heidegger’s Being (...)
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  4. David Carr (2009). Experience, Temporality and History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (4):335-354.score: 24.0
    Philosophers' reflections on history have been dominated for decades by two themes: representation and memory. On both of these accounts, historical inquiry is divided by a certain gap from what it seeks to find or wants to know, and its activity is seen by philosophers as that of bridging this gap. Against this background, the concept of experience, in spite of its apparent rootedness in the present, can be revived as a means of thinking about our connection to the past. (...)
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  5. James Mensch (2010). The Temporality of Merleau-Ponty's Intertwining. Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):449-463.score: 24.0
    In his last work, The Visible and the Invisible, Merleau-Ponty explored the fact that we believe that perception occurs in our heads ( in the recesses of a body ) and, hence, assert that the perceptual world is in us, while also believing that we are in the world we perceive. In this article, I examine how this intertwining of self and world justifies the faith we have in perception. I shall do so by considering a number of examples. In (...)
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  6. Elliot R. Wolfson (2010). Structure, Innovation, and Diremptive Temporality: The Use of Models to Study Continuity and Discontinuity in Kabbalistic Tradition. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (18):143-167.score: 24.0
    This study consists of two parts. The first is an examination of the hermeneutical presuppositions underlying the theory of models that Moshe Idel has applied to the study of Jewish mysticism. Idel has opted for a typological approach based on multiple explanatory models, a methodology that purportedly proffers a polychromatic as opposed to a monochromatic orientation associated with Scholem and the so-called school based on his teachings. The three major models delineated by Idel are the theosophical-theurgical, the ecstatic, and the (...)
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  7. Susanne Westman & Eva Alerby (2013). Rethinking Temporality in Education Drawing Upon the Philosophies of Merleau-Ponty and Deleuze: A Chiasmic Be(Com)Ing. Childhood and Philosophy 8 (16):355-377.score: 24.0
    The children of today live in a time when the images of themselves and their childhood, their needs, interests, and skills, are discussed, researched, challenged, and changed. Childhood, education and educational settings for young children are to a great extent governed by temporality. In this paper, temporality and temporal notions in education are explored and discussed. We especially illuminate two different ways of thinking about children in education and care for younger children in the West— the predominant biased (...)
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  8. Dan Zahavi (ed.) (1998). Self-Awareness, Temporality, and Alterity. Dordrecht: Kluwer.score: 24.0
    Focusing on the topics of self-awareness, temporality, and alterity, this anthology contains contributions by prominent phenomenologists from Germany, Belgium, France, Japan, USA, Canada and Denmark, all addressing questions very much in the center of current phenomenological debate. What is the relation between the self and the Other? How are self-awareness and intentionality intertwined? To what extent do the temporality and corporeality of subjectivity contain a dimension of alterity? How should one account for the intersubjectivity, interculturality and historicity of (...)
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  9. Assumpção Jr, Patricia Ribeiro Zukauskas & Nava Silton (2009). Temporality and Asperger's Syndrome. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40 (1):85-106.score: 21.0
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  10. Carol A. Kates (1970). Perception and Temporality in Husserl's Phenomenology. Philosophy Today 14 (2):89-100.score: 21.0
    The article is an explication of husserl's theory of perception. In particular, The meaning of 'constitution' is analyzed, With the result that traditional realistic or idealistic readings of husserl are discarded. Examination of passive and active synthesis and the meaning of 'hyle' within the framework of husserl's theory of inner time-Consciousness clarifies in turn the nature of phenomenological intuition and the significance of reduction.
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  11. Benny Shanon (2001). Altered Temporality. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (1):35-58.score: 21.0
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  12. David B. Greene (1984). Mahler: Consciousness And Temporality. Gordon & Breach.score: 21.0
     
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  13. Win-Chiat Lee (1990). Personal Identity, the Temporality of Agency, and Moral Responsibility. Auslegung 16 (1):17-29.score: 21.0
     
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  14. Alia Al-Saji (2007). The Temporality of Life: Merleau-Ponty, Bergson, and the Immemorial Past. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):177-206.score: 18.0
    Borrowing conceptual tools from Bergson, this essay asks after the shift in the temporality of life from Merleau-Ponty’s Phénoménologie de la perception to his later works. Although the Phénoménologie conceives life in terms of the field of presence of bodily action, later texts point to a life of invisible and immemorial dimensionality. By reconsidering Bergson, but also thereby revising his reading of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty develops a non-serial theory of time in the later works, one that acknowledges the verticality and (...)
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  15. Lisa Guenther (2011). Shame and the Temporality of Social Life. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):23-39.score: 18.0
    Shame is notoriously ambivalent. On one hand, it operates as a mechanism of normalization and social exclusion, installing or reinforcing patterns of silence and invisibility; on the other hand, the capacity for shame may be indispensible for ethical life insofar as it attests to the subject’s constitutive relationality and its openness to the provocation of others. Sartre, Levinas and Beauvoir each offer phenomenological analyses of shame in which its basic structure emerges as a feeling of being exposed to others and (...)
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  16. Andreas Hüttemann & Alan C. Love (2011). Aspects of Reductive Explanation in Biological Science: Intrinsicality, Fundamentality, and Temporality. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (3):519-549.score: 18.0
    The inapplicability of variations on theory reduction in the context of genetics and their irrelevance to ongoing research has led to an anti-reductionist consensus in philosophy of biology. One response to this situation is to focus on forms of reductive explanation that better correspond to actual scientific reasoning (e.g. part–whole relations). Working from this perspective, we explore three different aspects (intrinsicality, fundamentality, and temporality) that arise from distinct facets of reductive explanation: composition and causation. Concentrating on these aspects generates (...)
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  17. Jonathan Cohen (2010). Sounds and Temporality. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 5:303-320.score: 18.0
    What is the relationship between sounds and time? More specifically, is there something essentially or distinctively temporal about sounds that distinguishes them from, say, colors, shapes, odors, tastes, or other sensible qualities? And just what might this distinctive relation to time consist in? Apart from their independent interest, these issues have a number of important philosophical repercussions. First, if sounds are temporal in a way that other sensible qualities are not, then this would mean that standard lists of paradigm secondary (...)
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  18. David Scott (2006). The “Concept of Time” and the “Being of the Clock”: Bergson, Einstein, Heidegger, and the Interrogation of the Temporality of Modernism. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 39 (2):183-213.score: 18.0
    The topic to be addressed in this paper, that is, the distinction between the “concept” of time and the being of the clock, divides into two parts: first, in the debate between Albert Einstein and Henri Bergson, one discovers the ground for the diverging concepts of time characterized by physics in its opposing itself to philosophy. Bergson’s durée or “duration” in opposition to Einstein’s ‘physicist’s time’ as ‘public time,’ one can argue, sets the terms for Martin Heidegger’s extending, his ontological (...)
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  19. Mary J. Larrabee (1989). Time and Spatial Models: Temporality in Husserl. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (March):373-392.score: 18.0
    Recent treatments of time in husserl purport to give an account of the most fundamental aspects of what husserl terms inner time-Consciousness, The immanent temporality that is the primal constitutive source of human experience. A major difficulty with these presentations of husserl's time-Theory is that they continue to use theoretically reductionist models for time, Based on a sense of "flow" that is drawn from objective-Physical space and objects extended through such space. Such treatments fail to capture the very heart (...)
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  20. Catherine Malabou (2005). The Future of Hegel: Plasticity, Temporality, and Dialectic. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The Future of Hegel is one of the most important recent books on Hegel, a philosopher who has had a crucial impact on the shape of continental philosophy. Published here in English for the first time, it includes a substantial preface by Jacques Derrida in which he explores the themes and conclusions of Malabou's book. The Future of Hegel: Plasticity, Temporality and Dialectic restores Hegel's rich and complex concepts of time and temporality to contemporary philosophy. It examines Hegel's (...)
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  21. Shannon Winnubst (2010). Temporality in Queer Theory and Continental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 5 (2):136-146.score: 18.0
    The connections between the fields of queer theory and continental philosophy are strange and strained: simultaneously difficult and all too easy to ferret out, there is no easy narrative for how the two fields interconnect. Both sides of the relation seem either to disavow or simply repress any relation to the other. For example, despite the impact of Foucault's History of Sexuality, Volume One on early queer theory, current work in queer of color critique challenges the politics and epistemology of (...)
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  22. Anthony Rudd (2008). Kierkegaard on Patience and the Temporality of the Self: The Virtues of a Being in Time. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):491-509.score: 18.0
    This paper examines Kierkegaard's discussion of patience in some of his Upbuilding Discourses, and its connection with his understanding of the nature of selfhood as it appears both in the Discourses and in The Sickness unto Death. That understanding stresses that selfhood is not simply given, but is a task to be achieved—although a task that can only be achieved by the self that is formed in the process of undertaking it. For Kierkegaard, an account of the self that recognizes (...)
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  23. Bart Dessein (2011). Time, Temporality, and the Characteristic Marks of the Conditioned: Sarvāstivāda and Madhyamaka Buddhist Interpretations. Asian Philosophy 21 (4):341 - 360.score: 18.0
    According to the Buddhist concept of ?dependent origination? (prat?tyasamutp?da), discrete factors come into existence because of a combination of causes (hetu) and conditions (pratyaya). Such discrete factors, further, are combinations of five aggregates (pañ caskandha) that, themselves, are subject to constant change. Discrete factors, therefore, lack a self-nature (?tman). The passing through time of discrete factors is characterized by the ?characteristic marks of the conditioned?: birth (utp?da), change in continuance (sthityanyath?tva), and passing away (vyaya); or, alternatively: birth (j?ti), duration (sthiti), (...)
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  24. Ernâni Magalhães (2006). Armstrong on the Spatio-Temporality of Universals. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (2):301 – 308.score: 18.0
    Provocatively, David Armstrong's properties are supposed to be both universals and spatio-temporal. What does this amount to? I consider four of Armstrong's views, in order of ascending plausibility: (1) the exemplification account, on which universals are exemplified by space-times; (2) the location account, on which universals are located at space-times; (3) the first constituent account, on which spatio-temporal relations are elements of what I call the form of time; and, the true view, (4) the second constituent account, on which universals (...)
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  25. Shu-hsien Liu (1974). Time and Temporality: The Chinese Perspective. Philosophy East and West 24 (2):145-153.score: 18.0
    Although the chinese have a heightened sense of time, The concepts of time and temporality developed in their culture are remarkably different from those developed in the west. Certain time-Concepts familiar to the westerners are completely lacking in the chinese tradition. For example, The chinese lacked the concept of absolute time as that held by newton, They also lacked a system to record the years in a linear progressive way, And they seem to have shown a lack of drive (...)
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  26. Espen Hammer (2011). Philosophy and Temporality From Kant to Critical Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. The historicity of time; 2. Modern temporality; 3. Two responses to the time of modernity; 4. Hegel's temporalization of the absolute; 5. Schopenhauer and transcendence; 6. Time and myth in early Nietzsche; 7. Recurrence and authenticity: the later Nietzsche; 8. Heidegger on boredom and modernity; 9. A modernist critique of postmodern temporality; Conclusion.
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  27. A. Smirnova (2013). Evidentiality in Bulgarian: Temporality, Epistemic Modality, and Information Source. Journal of Semantics 30 (4):479-532.score: 18.0
    This article presents a formal semantic analysis of the Bulgarian evidential. The analysis is motivated by a number of facts that have gone unnoticed in the literature on evidentiality in Bulgarian and which cannot be explained by previous analyses (Izvorski 1997; Sauerland & Schenner 2007; Koev 2011). First, I show that the same evidential construction in Bulgarian can express direct, reportative and inferential information sources. These data challenge the current analysis of the Bulgarian evidential as indirect (Izvorski 1997), and show (...)
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  28. Erik Olin Wright & Kwang-Yeong Shin (1988). Temporality and Class Analysis: A Comparative Study of the Effects of Class Trajectory and Class Structure on Class Consciousness in Sweden and the United States. Sociological Theory 6 (1):58-84.score: 18.0
    Some of the important conceptual debates between different approaches to class analysis can be interpreted as reflecting different ways of linking temporality to class structure. In particular, processual concepts of class can be viewed as linking class to the past whereas structural concepts link class to the future. This contrast in the temporality of class concepts in turn is grounded in distinct intuitions about why class is explanatory of social conflict and social change. Processural approaches to class see (...)
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  29. Alia Al-Saji (2007). The Temporality of Life. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):177-206.score: 18.0
    Borrowing conceptual tools from Bergson, this essay asks after the shift in the temporality of life from Merleau-Ponty’s Phénoménologie de la perception to his later works. Although the Phénoménologie conceives life in terms of the field of presence of bodily action, later texts point to a life of invisible and immemorial dimensionality. By reconsidering Bergson, but also thereby revising his reading of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty develops a nonserial theory of time in the later works, one that acknowledges the verticality and (...)
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  30. Roman Altshuler (2010). An Unconditioned Will: The Role of Temporality in Freedom and Agency. Dissertation, SUNY Stony Brookscore: 18.0
    Eliminativists about free will and moral responsibility argue that no action can be free and responsible because in order to be actions, our movements must be caused by features of our character or will. However, either the will is constituted by states that are themselves produced by events outside our control, or it is constituted by our own choices, which must themselves stem from our will in order to be up to us. Thus, any attempt to account for freedom and (...)
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  31. Timothy M. Costelloe (1994). Schutz, Music, and Temporality: A Wittgensteinian Assessment. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (4):439-457.score: 18.0
    In his account of musical interaction and temporality, Schutz's outer-inner distinction appears to capture a component of everyday experience. But engagement with Wittgensteinian philosophy reveals Schutz's false contrast between literal and metaphorical components of language, a series of philosophical confusions stemming from reifications of mental verbs, and the attribution of genuine duration to phenomena that have life as linguistic objects. Consequently, Schutz's intended account of social interaction comes to rest upon a radically private concept of the subject. A sociology (...)
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  32. Tim Fernando, Entailments in Finite-State Temporality.score: 18.0
    The “surge in use of finite-state methods” ([10]) in computational linguistics has largely, if not completely, left semantics untouched. The present paper is directed towards correcting this situation. Techniques explained in [1] are applied to a fragment of temporal semantics through an approach we call finite-state temporality. This proceeds from the intuition of an event as “a series of snapshots” ([15]; see also [12]), equating snapshots with symbols that collectively form our alphabet. A sequence of snapshots then becomes a (...)
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  33. Kenneth K. Inada (1974). Time and Temporality: A Buddhist Approach. Philosophy East and West 24 (2):171-179.score: 18.0
    The buddhist approach to the concepts of time and temporality is necessarily based on the correct understanding of the ordinary but dynamically oriented experiential process. in such a process, the concept of time takes on conventional, arbitrary and abstract natures, and subsequently gives way to the concept of temporality which is part and parcel of the experiential process and directly opens up other buddhist doctrines such as relational origination and voidness of being. temporality is non-conventional 'lived time'.
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  34. T. M. Rudavsky (1997). Creation and Temporality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Faith and Philosophy 14 (4):458-477.score: 18.0
    Of the many philosophical perplexities facing medieval Jewish thinkers, perhaps none has been as challenging or as divisive as determining whether the universe is created or eternal. Not unlike contemporary cosmologists who worry about the first instant of creation of the universe, or Christian scholastics who attempted to define the nature of an instant, so too medieval Jewish thinkers were aware of the philosophical complexities surrounding the issues of creation and time. Jews were immensely affected by Scripture and in particular (...)
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  35. Jason C. Robinson (2006). Timeless Temporality. Idealistic Studies 36 (2):97-107.score: 18.0
    This article explores Gadamer’s description of time(s) and situates it within his aesthetic account and hermeneutics. Bringing together all of Gadamer’s major discussions on time, I develop a consistent account which I then challenge. Whereas Heidegger famously describes transcendental temporality with an emphasis on futurity, Gadamer accentuates a historical temporal awareness and itsdiscontinuous nature. Gadamer’s notion of time is best understood, paradoxically, as a timeless temporality, when time is defined as the sequential movement along discrete points. I argue (...)
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  36. Nicholas Smith, The Temporality of Sexual Life in Husserl and Freud. Phenomenology of Eros.score: 18.0
    In this text I would like to show two things. Firstly, that the so-called “timelessness” of the Freudian unconscious can be elucidated through an interpretation of the concept of Nachträglichkeit, and showing thereby that there is indeed a temporality specific to the workings of the unconscious. Freud’s analysis of early psychic trauma related to sexual phenomena pointed to a serious complication for all believers in the immediate transparency of consciousness. For the “wound” itself was constituted over time, and the (...)
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  37. Benny Shanon (1998). The Intrinsic Temporality of Human Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):650-651.score: 18.0
    In conformity with the dynamical perspective advocated by van Gelder, a more psychological approach can highlight the intrinsic temporality of human cognition, revealing the inadequacies of representationalism as a framework for the modeling of mind.
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  38. Paul Fitzgerald (1982). Temporality, Secondary Qualities, and the Location of Sensations. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:293 - 303.score: 18.0
    Several philosophers have argued that "temporal becoming" is mind-dependent, a claim they see as analogous to the traditional one about the mind-dependence of secondary qualities. They have tended to assume that the classical secondary qualities are mind-dependent, and also that the close analogue for time of directly experienced secondary qualities is an irreducibly indexical nowness. In an earlier article it was argued that we should reject the second assumption. Here it is shown why there is indeed a genuine problem of (...)
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  39. Suninn Yun (2014). Education, Freedom, and Temporality: A Response to Biesta and Säfström's Manifesto. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (3):385-399.score: 18.0
    Since it was first published in 2011, ‘A Manifesto for Education’ by Gert Biesta and Karl Anders Säfström has received numerous enthusiastic reviews and been hailed as providing ‘an alternative vision for education’. Such enthusiasm, however, is perhaps not purely attributable to the substance of the text but also to the form that it adopts. In this regard, I attempt to explore what the authors refer to as the ironic usage of this genre of writing in relation to its message. (...)
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  40. Steven B. Cowan (1996). A Reductio Ad Absurdum of Divine Temporality. Religious Studies 32 (3):371 - 378.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I present an argument to show that the doctrine of divine temporality (the view that God is in time, but everlastingly eternal) is incoherent. The doctrine of divine temporality entails that God has traversed an actually infinite series of moments in order to reach the present. But I show that an actually infinite series of moments cannot be traversed. Hence, God could not have traversed his infinite past to reach the present. Therefore, the doctrine of (...)
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  41. Daniel W. Smith (2013). Temporality and Truth. Deleuze Studies 7 (3):377-389.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the intersecting of the themes of temporality and truth in Deleuze's philosophy. For the ancients, truth was something eternal: what was true was true in all times and in all places. Temporality (coming to be and passing away) was the realm of the mutable, not the eternal. In the seventeenth century, change began to be seen in a positive light (progress, evolution, and so on), but this change was seen to be possible only because of (...)
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  42. Stephanie Clare (2009). Agency, Signification, and Temporality. Hypatia 24 (4):50 - 62.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the temporality of agency in Judith Butler's and Saba Mahmood's writing. I argue that Mahmood moves away from a performative understanding of agency, which focuses on relations of signification, to a corporeal understanding, which focuses on desire and sensation. Drawing on Gilles Deleuze's reading of Henri Bergson, I show how this move involves a changed model of becoming: whereas Butler imagines movement as a series of discontinuous beings, in Mahmood's case, we get an understanding of becoming.
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  43. Natalie Depraz (1998). Can I Anticipate Myself? Self-Affection and Temporality. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Self-Awareness, Temporality, and Alterity. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 83--97.score: 18.0
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  44. James Noggle (2012). The Temporality of Taste in Eighteenth-Century British Writing. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    Is taste a quick, momentary experience in the individual mind? Or something durable, shaped by slow, historical processes, affecting groups of people at different times and places? British writers in the eighteenth century believed that it was both, and the tension between these temporal poles shaped the meaning of taste in the period and set a course for aesthetics in following centuries. Focusing on works in many genres-Alexander Pope's poems, David Hume's historiography, essays by Hannah More and Anna Barbauld, and (...)
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  45. Xabier Barandiaran, E. Di Paolo & M. Rohde (2009). Defining Agency: Individuality, Normativity, Asymmetry, and Spatio-Temporality in Action. Adaptive Behavior 17 (5):367-386.score: 18.0
    The concept of agency is of crucial importance in cognitive science and artificial intelligence, and it is often used as an intuitive and rather uncontroversial term, in contrast to more abstract and theoretically heavy-weighted terms like “intentionality”, “rationality” or “mind”. However, most of the available definitions of agency are either too loose or unspecific to allow for a progressive scientific program. They implicitly and unproblematically assume the features that characterize agents, thus obscuring the full potential and challenge of modeling agency. (...)
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  46. Marek Pokropski (forthcoming). Timing Together, Acting Together. Phenomenology of Intersubjective Temporality and Social Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-13.score: 18.0
    In this article I consider how the problem of social (intersubjective) cognition relates to time-consciousness. In the first part, I briefly introduce Husserl’s account of intersubjective cognition. I discuss the concept of empathy (Einfühlung) and its relation with time-consciousness. I argue that empathy is based on pre-reflective awareness of the other’s harmony of behaviour. In the second part, I distinguish pre-reflective (passive) and reflective (active) empathy and consider recent empirical research in the field of social cognition. I argue that these (...)
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  47. Anthony Steinbock (1998). Temporality and the Point: The Origins and Crisis of Continental Philosophy. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Self-Awareness, Temporality, and Alterity. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 151--167.score: 18.0
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  48. Ben Tyrer (2013). Film Noir as Point de Capiton : Double Indemnity , Structure and Temporality. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):96-114.score: 18.0
    Reading noir and Lacan together can establish a structural corollary between the function of the signifier 'noir' in film criticism and the retroactive function of the point de capiton in Lacan's theory of language. Furthermore, at a narrative level, the function of the point de capiton can also be found in the retroactive constructions of film noir flashbacks. It is therefore possible to say that a retroactive 'noir temporality' is also the temporality of the Symbolic order. This article (...)
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  49. Kasia M. Jaszczolt (2009). Representing Time: An Essay on Temporality as Modality. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    Thinking and speaking about time is ridden with puzzles and paradoxes. How do human beings conceptualize time? Why, for example, does the availability of tense vary in different languages? How do the lines of information from tense, aspect, temporal adverbs, and context interact in the mind? Does time describe events? If real time does not flow, where do the concepts of the past, present and future come from? Are they basic concepts or are they composed out of more primitive constituents? (...)
     
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