Search results for 'Tennyson Samraj' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Tennyson Samraj (2001). What is Your Belief Quotient? Monograph Publishers.
    This monograph examines the meaning of religion.
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  2. Sharon Tennyson (2008). Moral, Social, and Economic Dimensions of Insurance Claims Fraud. Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (4):1181-1204.
    Insurance claims fraud receives increasing attention in the insurance industry, in academic studies and in public policy spheres. Claims fraud is variously viewed as an economic-contractual problem, a moral-psychological problem, a moral-sociological problem or a criminal problem. This article discusses these theoretical perspectives on insurance claims fraud and reviews the empirical evidence on its nature and prevalence. Most research concludes that opportunistic soft fraud is more prevalent than planned criminal fraud, and that consumer ethics, attitudes and psychology are important aspects (...)
     
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  3.  1
    Joyce F. Benenson, Robert Tennyson & Richard W. Wrangham (2011). Male More Than Female Infants Imitate Propulsive Motion. Cognition 121 (2):262-267.
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  4.  5
    G. B. Tennyson (1998). Removing the Veil. Renascence 50 (3-4):205-219.
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  5.  3
    G. B. Tennyson (1990). Removing the Veil. Renascence 43 (1):29-44.
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  6.  5
    G. B. Tennyson (1998). Removing the Veil. Renascence 50 (3-4):205-219.
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  7. Owen Barfield, C. S. Lewis & G. B. Tennyson (1989). Owen Barfield on C.S. Lewis.
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  8. T. Samraj (1996). On Being Equally Free and Unequally Restricted. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 23 (3-4):379-394.
     
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  9. Frederic Harrison (1899). Tennyson, Ruskin, Mill and Other Literary Estimates. Macmillan.
     
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  10. Milton Millhauser (1956). Tennyson: Artifice and Image. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (3):333-338.
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  11.  29
    Sister M. Paraclita (1946). Aubrey de Vere, Tennyson and Alice Meynell. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):109-126.
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  12.  14
    Thomas A. Kirby (1950). Tennyson Sixty Years After. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):171-173.
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  13.  8
    Howard W. Fulweiler (1986). Tennyson's "The Holy Grail". Renascence 38 (3):144-159.
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  14.  9
    G. K. Chesterton (1997). Tennyson. The Chesterton Review 23 (3):259-263.
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  15.  4
    H. E. (1927). Version From Tennyson. The Classical Review 41 (03):112-.
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  16.  7
    Stephen Gaselee (1935). Medieval and Modern Latin E. T. Silk: Saeculi Noni Auctoris in Boetii Consolationem Philosophiae Commentarius. Pp. Lxii + 350. American Academy in Rome, 1935. Cloth. F. R. Newte: Boadicea. (3) L. N. Wild: Burke's Observations on a Late Publication Entitled The Present State of the Nation. (4) A. T. G. Holmes: A Translation of Tennyson's Tithonus. Oxford: Blackwell, 1935. Paper, 2S., 2S., 2S. 6d. [Anon.] Series Episcoporutn Romanae Ecclesiae … Versibus Hexametris in Usum Scholarum Conscripta. Pp. 24. London: Milford, 1935. Paper, 3s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (05):194-195.
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  17.  14
    Howard W. Fulweiler (1984). Tennyson's in Memoriam and the Scientific Imagination. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 59 (3):296-318.
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  18.  13
    Richard P. Benton (1962). Tennyson and Lao Tzu. Philosophy East and West 12 (3):233-240.
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  19.  8
    M. Bromley (1996). N. Rudd: The Classical Tradition in Operation. Chaucer/Virgil, Shakespeare/Plautus, Pope/Horace, Tennyson/Lucretius, Pound/Propertius. (The Robson Classical Lectures.) Toronto, Buffalo, London: University of Toronto Press, 1994. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (1):149-150.
  20.  6
    W. J. Roberts (1910). Book Review:Tennyson as a Thinker. Henry S. Salt. [REVIEW] Ethics 20 (4):513-.
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  21.  1
    E. Hershey Sneath (1905). The Mind of Tennyson. Philosophical Review 14:99.
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  22.  1
    Geoffrey Ward (1986). Dying to Write: Maurice Blanchot and Tennyson's "Tithonus". Critical Inquiry 12 (4):672-687.
    The customary assumption about dying is that one would rather not. The event of death itself should be postponed for as long as possible, and comfort may be gained from doctrines which promise a victory over it. We celebrate those who try to cheat it. The dying Henry James thought he was Napoleon, and there is something in that, over and above the pathos of a wandering mind, that exemplifies, however parodically, the mental set we expect to find and what (...)
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  23.  2
    Howard W. Fulweiler (1986). Tennyson'S. Renascence 38 (3):144-159.
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  24.  4
    Jan Marten Ivo Klaver (2007). Tennyson's Scepticism. By Aidan Day. Heythrop Journal 48 (5):818–819.
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  25. Richard Finn (1989). The Value of Literature: III?Tennyson's Doubts. New Blackfriars 70 (825):138-146.
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  26. Erik Gray (forthcoming). Tennyson, Virgil, and the Death of Christmas: Influence and the" Morte d'Arthur". Arion.
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  27. Ernest Hartsock (1930). Poor Old Tennyson. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 11 (1):28.
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  28. Henry Jones (1909). Tennyson. Hibbert Journal 8:264.
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  29. George Landow (1974). Closing The Frame: Having Faith And Keeping Faith In Tennyson's "the Passing Of Arthur". Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 56 (2):423-442.
     
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  30. W. J. Roberts (1910). Tennyson as a ThinkerHenry S. Salt. International Journal of Ethics 20 (4):513-514.
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  31. W. J. Roberts (1909). Tennyson as a Thinker, by Henry S. Salt. [REVIEW] Ethics 20:513.
     
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  32. Henry S. Salt (1910). Tennyson as a Thinker. International Journal of Ethics 20 (4):513-514.
     
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  33. George Santayana (1904). Neath's Philosophy in Poetry and Mind of Tennyson. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 1 (8):216.
     
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  34. Wd Shaw (1991). The Fashioner of Worlds-Ultimate Reality in Tennyson. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 14 (4):245-262.
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  35. N. I. Sokolova (2016). A. Tennyson’s “Godiva”: The English National Symbol in the Victorian Poet’s Perception. Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitaryj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 5 (1):44.
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  36. Joseph Solimine (1966). The Dialectics of Church and State: Tennyson's Historical Plays. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):218.
     
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  37. G. Ward (1986). Dying to Write, Blanchot, Maurice and Tennyson'Tithonus'. Critical Inquiry 12 (4):672-687.
     
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  38. Ann Wordsworth (1981). An Art That Will Not Abandon the Self to Language: Bloom, Tennyson, and the Blind World of the Wish. In Robert Young (ed.), Untying the Text: A Post-Structuralist Reader. Routledge & Kegan Paul 207--22.
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  39. David Knight (2000). Higher Pantheism. Zygon 35 (3):603-612.
    Romantic sensibility and political necessity led Humphry Davy, Britain's most prominent scientist in the first quarter of the nineteenth century, to pantheism: nature worship, involving for him a fervent belief in the immortality of the soul. Rapt with a vision of sublimity, from mountain tops or balloons, men of science in succeeding generations also found in pantheism a reason for their vocation and a way of making sense of their world. It should be seen as an alternative both to active (...)
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  40.  31
    Bart Schultz (2012). Book Reviews Phillips , David . Sidgwickian Ethics New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Pp. Xii+163. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (1):174-179.
  41. W. H. Mallock (1884). Atheism and the Value of Life Five Studies in Contemporary Literature. Bentley.
  42.  7
    Angela Leighton (2007). On Form: Poetry, Aestheticism, and the Legacy of a Word. OUP Oxford.
    On Form assesses both the legacy of Victorian aestheticism and the nature of the literary. It tracks the development of the word 'form' since the Romantics and offers readings of, among others, Tennyson, Yeats, Stevens, and Plath. Original readings of poetry are combined with a powerful argument about the nature of aesthetic pleasure.
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  43.  41
    Mikel Burley (2012). D. Z. Phillips' Contemplations on Religion and Literature. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (1):21-37.
    This paper critically discusses D. Z. Phillips’ use of literary works as a resource for philosophical reflection on religion. Beginning by noting Phillips’ suggestion, made in relation to Waiting for Godot , that the possibilities of meaning that we see in a literary work can reveal something of our own religious sensibility, I then proceed to show what we learn about Phillips from his readings of certain works by Larkin, Tennyson, and Wharton. Through exploring alternative possible readings, I argue (...)
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  44.  12
    Dorothy Mermin (1986). The Damsel, the Knight, and the Victorian Woman Poet. Critical Inquiry 13 (1):64-80.
    The association of poetry and femininity … excluded women poets. For the female figures onto whom the men projected their artistic selves—Tennyson’s Mariana and Lady of Shalott, Browning’s Pippa and Balaustion, Arnold’s Iseult of Brittany—represent an intensification of only a part of the poet, not his full consciousness: a part, furthermore, which is defined as separate from and ignorant of the public world and the great range of human experience in society. Such figures could not write their own poems; (...)
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  45.  4
    Harold Bloom (1975). Poetry, Revisionism, Repression. Critical Inquiry 2 (2):233-251.
    The strong word and stance issue only from a strict will, a will that dares the error of reading all of reality as a text, and all prior texts as openings for its own totalizing and unique interpretations. Strong poets present themselves as looking for truth in the world, searching in reality and in tradition, but such a stance, as Nietzsche said, remains under the mastery of desire, of instinctual drives. So, in effect, the strong poet wants pleasure and not (...)
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  46.  5
    Margaret H. Nesse (1995). Guinevere's Choice. Human Nature 6 (2):145-163.
    This paper examines four retellings of the Arthurian legend of Guinevere and Lancelot from a bio-evolutionary perspective. The historical and social conditions which provide contexts for the retellings are described, and those conditions are related to underlying male and female reproductive strategies. Since the authors of the selected texts, Chrétien de Troyes, Thomas Malory, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and William Morris, are all male, the assumption is made that these versions of the legend reflect male reproductive preoccupations and encode male (...)
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  47.  13
    Michael V. White (1991). Frightening the 'Landed Fogies': Parliamentary Politics and The Coal Question. Utilitas 3 (2):289.
    In early 1864, disappointed by the response to his previous work, the young Manchester academic W. Stanley Jevons announced that he was undertaking a study of the so-called coal question: ‘A good publication on the subject would draw a good deal of attention … it is necessary for the present at any rate to write on popular subjects’. When Jevons's The Coal Question was published in April 1865, however, it received comparatively little attention and sales were slow. Jevons and his (...)
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  48.  4
    Tennyson (1898). A Portrait. The Classical Review 12 (03):180-.
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  49.  5
    Ralph W. Rader (1976). The Dramatic Monologue and Related Lyric Forms. Critical Inquiry 3 (1):131-151.
    The most distinctive and highly valued poems of the modern era offer an image of a dramatized "I" acting in a concrete setting. The variety and importance of the poems which fall under this description are suggested simply by the mention of such names as "Elegy Written in a Country Courtyard," "Tintern Abbey," "Ode to a Nightingale," "Ulysses," "My Last Duchess," "Dover Beach," "The Windhover," "The Darkling Thrush," "Sailing to Byzantium," "Leda and the Swan," "The Love Song of J. Alfred (...)
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  50.  5
    Ben Wolfson (2014). Nietzsche and Schlegel on Teaching Oneself to Find. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (3):315-330.
    In the second verse of the prelude to GS, Nietzsche writes, “Since I grew weary of the search / I taught myself to find instead.”1 The thought that one might teach oneself to find is certainly attractive; even the most ardent admirer of Tennyson’s and Cavafy’s versions of Odysseus will admit that some searches are wearisome. Better just to be in the desired end state, and forget about the tedium of getting there. But it is undoubtedly paradoxical as well: (...)
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