Search results for 'Teresa Chandler' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Teresa Chandler (2001). Kinds of Emotion. Biology and Philosophy 16 (1):109-115.score: 240.0
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  2. Geoffrey Chandler (1998). Oil Companies and Human Rights. Business Ethics 7 (2):69–72.score: 60.0
    The chairman of Amnesty International’s UK Business Group considers how oil companies must change their attitudes in a world which is changing faster. “Silence or inaction will be seen to provide comfort to oppression and may be adjudged complicity.” Sir Geoffrey Chandler CBE is a former senior executive of the Royal/Dutch Shell Group and architect of Shell’s first Statement of General Business Principles. This article is reprinted with permission from Oxford Energy Forum, November 1, 1997.
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  3. Daniele Archibugi & David Chandler (2009). A Dialogue on International Interventions: When Are They a Right or an Obligation? Ethics and Global Politics 2 (2).score: 60.0
    Edited by Nieves Zúñiga García-Falces. In 15 years, the international community has been blamed for resorting too easily to the use of force on some occasions (Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo), and also it has been blamed for intervening too late or not at all in other crises (Rwanda, Bosnia and today Sudan and Congo). Even today, one of the most contested questions of international politics is the legitimacy for the use of force. David Chandler, Professor of International Relations at the (...)
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  4. James K. Chandler, Arnold Ira Davidson & Harry D. Harootunian (eds.) (1994). Questions of Evidence: Proof, Practice, and Persuasion Across the Disciplines. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Biologists, historians, lawyers, art historians, and literary critics all voice arguments in the critical dialogue about what constitutes evidence in research and scholarship. They examine not only the constitution and "blurring" of disciplinary boundaries, but also the configuration of the fact-evidence distinctions made in different disciplines and historical moments the relative function of such concepts as "self-evidence," "experience," "test," "testimony," and "textuality" in varied academic discourses and the way "rules of evidence" are themselves products of historical developments. The essays and (...)
     
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  5. Ronnie Littlejohn & Marthe Chandler (eds.) (2008). Polishing the Chinese Mirror: Essays in Honor of Henry Rosemont, Jr. Global Scholarly Publications.score: 60.0
    Edited by Marthe Chandler and Ronnie Littlejohn, this work is a collection of expository and critical essays on the work of Henry Rosemont, Jr., a prominent and influential contemporary philosopher, activist, translator, and educator in the field of Asian and Comparative Philosophy. The essays in this collection take up three major themes in Rosemont's work: his work in Chinese linguistics, his contribution to the theory of human rights, and his interest in East Asian religion. Contributions include works by the (...)
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  6. Hugh Chandler, Augustine's Argument for the Existence of God.score: 30.0
    Roughly speaking, Augustine claims that ‘Immutable Truth’ is superior to the human mind and, consequently a legitimate candidate for the role of God. Clearly there is such a thing as Immutable Truth. So either that is God, or there is something superior to Immutable Truth, and that superior thing is God. I spell out this argument, and offer some objections to it.
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  7. Hugh S. Chandler, Martha Nussbaum and Alcibiades.score: 30.0
    Nussbaum seems to have had a spell during which she made villains heroes (and sometimes visa versa). Thus she has argued, in effect, that Steerforth is the hero of David Copperfield, and Heathcliff the most admirable character in Wuthering Heights. Here I discuss her more or less explicit claim that Alcibiades is the hero, (and Socrates the villain) in Plato’s Symposium. -/- .
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  8. Hugh S. Chandler, Parfit on Division.score: 30.0
    Parfit’s well known book, Reasons and Persons, argues, among other things, that ‘what matters’ in regard to ‘survival’ is not personal identity but something he calls ‘relation R.’ On this basis, plus other considerations, he rejects the ‘Self-interest’ theory as to what should be our aim in life. Here I show, or try to show, that his over-all argument is seriously defective. In particular, he fails to prove that personal identity is not what matters for survival.
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  9. Hugh Chandler, Plato's Prime Mover Argument.score: 30.0
    In Laws book X Plato tries to give us conclusive evidence that there are at least two gods (one good and the other bad). The reasoning depends crucially on the idea of ‘self moving motion.’ In this paper I try to show that the ‘evidence’ is not persuasive. (Nevertheless, the idea of ‘self – moving motion is interesting.).
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  10. Hugh Chandler (2010). Wittgenstein on the Resurrection. Philosophical Investigations 33 (4):321-338.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein probably did not believe in Christ's Resurrection (as an historical event), but he may well have believed that if he had achieved a higher level of devoutness he would believe it. His view seems to have been that devout Christians are right in holding onto this belief tenaciously even though, in fact, it's false. It's historical falsity, is compatible with its religious validity, so to speak. So far as I can see, he did not think that devout Christians should (...)
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  11. Hugh S. Chandler, Plantinga's Christian Epistemology.score: 30.0
    Plantinga claims that, at least for some people, the belief that God exists is ‘properly basic,’ or rather that they have properly basic beliefs that entail the existence of God. I think the underlying idea here is that we all have a properly working sensus divinitatus. This guarantees the existence of God. But, of course, if God does not exist, then our sensus divinitatus is not working properly, i.e. is not, really a sensus divinitatus. The issue as to whether there (...)
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  12. Hugh S. Chandler, Putnam on Realism.score: 30.0
    In 1974 Putnam was a ‘realist’ in regard to the physical world. By 1981 he had become a 'non-realist' in this regard. (I don’t know where he stands today.) In this paper I argue that his realism was more plausible than his non-realism. The physical world is what it is independently of any rational being’s interpretation of it.
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  13. Hugh S. Chandler, How Many Minds?score: 30.0
    In Analysis, Vol. 45, June 1984, George Rea published a paper attacking my claim that there could be ‘indeterminate minds'. This paper is a reply to his attack. I claim, again, that such ‘minds’ are possible – entities such that it is indeterminate whether or not these entities are people with minds. -/- .
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  14. Hugh Chandler, Paley's 'Proof' of the Existence of God.score: 30.0
    Paley’s ‘proof’ of the existence of God, or some supposed version of it, is well known. In this paper I offer the real thing and two objections to it. One objection is Hume's, and the other is provided by Darwin.
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  15. Hugh Chandler, Can There Be Conflict Between Conscience and Self-Love?score: 30.0
    Ethical dualists hold that we have good reason to pursue our own happiness and good reason to pursue moral goodness. It would seem that there is a potential conflict here. On the other hand there have been those who deny even the possibility of conflict, whether or not there is a God and an afterlife. Rawls seems to say, or hint, that this was Butlers’ view, and Kant, according to at least one person, argued that there cannot be conflict here. (...)
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  16. Hugh Chandler, Contingent Apriori Truths.score: 30.0
    This paper attempts to show that Scott Soames has not given us an example of a contingent a priori truth. (What it probably shows is how confused I am on this topic.).
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  17. Hugh Chandler, The Monologion Argument for the Existence and Supremacy of God.score: 30.0
    In the first two chapters of the Monologion Anselm shows, or tries to show that “Of all the things that exist, there is one that is the best, greatest and supreme.” In this paper I examine his argument.
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  18. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.score: 30.0
    Aristippus’ theory is, surely, one of the first genuinely ‘philosophical’ theories of ethics. He advocates pursuing immediate pleasure and avoiding immediate pain. This doctrine evoked vigorous attacks from such notables as Plato and Aristotle. Here I consider some of those early arguments.
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  19. Jake Chandler (2013). Acceptance, Aggregation and Scoring Rules. Erkenntnis 78 (1):201 - 217.score: 30.0
    As the ongoing literature on the paradoxes of the Lottery and the Preface reminds us, the nature of the relation between probability and rational acceptability remains far from settled. This article provides a novel perspective on the matter by exploiting a recently noted structural parallel with the problem of judgment aggregation. After offering a number of general desiderata on the relation between finite probability models and sets of accepted sentences in a Boolean sentential language, it is noted that a number (...)
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  20. Jake Chandler (forthcoming). Subjective Probabilities Need Not Be Sharp. Erkenntnis:1-14.score: 30.0
    It is well known that classical, aka ‘sharp’, Bayesian decision theory, which models belief states as single probability functions, faces a number of serious difficulties with respect to its handling of agnosticism. These difficulties have led to the increasing popularity of so-called ‘imprecise’ models of decision-making, which represent belief states as sets of probability functions. In a recent paper, however, Adam Elga has argued in favour of a putative normative principle of sequential choice that he claims to be borne out (...)
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  21. Jake Chandler (2013). Transmission Failure, AGM-Style. Erkenntnis 78 (2):383-398.score: 30.0
    This article provides a discussion of the principle of transmission of evidential support across entailment from the perspective of belief revision theory in the AGM tradition. After outlining and briefly defending a small number of basic principles of belief change, which include a number of belief contraction analogues of the Darwiche-Pearl postulates for iterated revision, a proposal is then made concerning the connection between evidential beliefs and belief change policies in rational agents. This proposal is found to be suffcient to (...)
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  22. Hugh S. Chandler, Fuzzy Cooky-Cutter Classes.score: 30.0
    It seems clear that second order fuzziness (indeterminacy) is possible. There can be borderline cases of borderline cases. But how about third order cases? Is there no end of degrees of borderlinehood? I offer a somewhat strange little 'language game' that seems to suggest that the ascension ends with second order cases. (The 'game' is intended to be somewhat like a simplified version of color perception.).
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  23. Hugh S. Chandler (1975). Rigid Designation. Journal of Philosophy 72 (13):363-369.score: 30.0
    I have been told that for some twenty minutes after reading this paper Kripke believed I had shown that proper names could be non-rigid designators. (Then, apparently, he found a crucial error in the set-up.) I take great pride in this (alleged) fact.
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  24. Hugh Chandler, Personal God or Something Greater.score: 30.0
    Alvin Plantinga says that according to classical Muslim, Jewish, and Christian belief, God is a person. (He spells out some of the characteristics of people as such.) In this rather messy little note I try to show that some of the best, most influential, Christian theologians, prior to the Reformation, did not think that God is literally a person (in Plantinga’s sense). In particular I focus on Anselm.
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  25. Jake Chandler (2009). Review of Franz Huber and Christoph Schmidt-Petri, Eds. Degrees of Belief. Philosophy in Review 296 (6):422-424.score: 30.0
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  26. Hugh Chandler, The Problem of Good.score: 30.0
    -/- Very few (if any) people believe that the world was created, and is maintained, by a thoroughly contemptible and malicious being. Do we have good reason for our disbelief? In the first part of this paper I offer an argument for the non-existence of such a being. According to this argument there is just too much good - too may good things - in the world for the ‘malicious being’ theory to be plausible. In the second part of the (...)
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  27. Hugh S. Chandler (1993). Some Ontological Arguments. Faith and Philosophy 10 (Jan):18-180.score: 30.0
    This was an attempt to show what is wrong with Anselm’s ‘Ontological Argument’ for the existence of God. My present view is that Peter Millican has given us a similar, but much better line of attack in his “The One Fatal Flaw….” Paper.
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  28. Jake Chandler (2010). The Transmission of Support: A Bayesian Re-Analysis. [REVIEW] Synthese 176 (3):333 - 343.score: 30.0
    Crispin Wright’s discussion of the notion of ‘transmission-failure’ promises to have important philosophical ramifications, both in epistemology and beyond. This paper offers a precise, formal characterisation of the concept within a Bayesian framework. The interpretation given avoids the serious shortcomings of a recent alternative proposal due to Samir Okasha.
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  29. Hugh S. Chandler (1967). Excluded Middle. Journal of Philosophy 64 (24):807-814.score: 30.0
    This is a paper on borderline cases and the law of Excluded Middle. In it I try to make use of some long forgotten, but perhaps valuable, work on the topic – a bit of Hegel for instance.
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  30. Jake Chandler (2013). Defeat Reconsidered. Analysis 73 (1):49-51.score: 30.0
    It appears to have gone unnoticed in the literature that Pollock's widely endorsed analysis of evidential defeat entails a remarkably strong symmetry principle, according to which, for any three propositions D, E and H, if both E and D provide a reason to believe H, then D is a defeater for E's support for H if and only if, in turn, E is a defeater for D's support for H. After illustrating the counterintuitiveness of this constraint, a simple, more suitable, (...)
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  31. Hugh Chandler, Some Remarks on Hills's The Beloved Self.score: 30.0
    Here are a few remarks in regard to the first section of Alison Hills’s The Beloved Self. The topic is various forms of ‘Egoism.’ These are taken to be theories of practical reason – alternative answers to the question ‘what have I reason to do?’.
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  32. John H. Chandler (1987). Androcentric Science? The Science Question in Feminism. Inquiry 30 (3):317 – 332.score: 30.0
  33. Jake Chandler & Adam Rieger (2011). Self-Respect Regained. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (2pt2):311-318.score: 30.0
    In a recent article, David Christensen casts aspersions on a restricted version of van Fraassen's Reflection principle, which he dubs ‘Self-Respect’(sr). Rejecting two possible arguments for sr, he concludes that the principle does not constitute a requirement of rationality. In this paper we argue that not only has Christensen failed to make a case against the aforementioned arguments, but that considerations pertaining to Moore's paradox indicate that sr, or at the very least a mild weakening thereof, is indeed a plausible (...)
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  34. Jake Chandler (2010). The Lottery Paradox Generalized? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (3):667-679.score: 30.0
    In a recent article, Douven and Williamson offer both (i) a rebuttal of various recent suggested sufficient conditions for rational acceptability and (ii) an alleged ‘generalization’ of this rebuttal, which, they claim, tells against a much broader class of potential suggestions. However, not only is the result mentioned in (ii) not a generalization of the findings referred to in (i), but in contrast to the latter, it fails to have the probative force advertised. Their paper does however, if unwittingly, bring (...)
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  35. Douglas McKnight & Prentice Chandler (2012). The Complicated Conversation of Class and Race in Social and Curricular Analysis: An Examination of Pierre Bourdieu's Interpretative Framework in Relation to Race. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5-6):74-97.score: 30.0
    As a means to challenge and diminish the hold of mainstream curriculum's claim of being a colorblind, politically neutral text, we will address two particular features that partially, though significantly, constitute the hidden curriculum in the United States—race and class—historically studied as separate social issues. Race and class have been embedded within the institutional curriculum from the beginning in the US; though rarely acknowledged as intertwined issues. We illustrate how the theoretical and interpretive structure of French philosopher and sociologist Pierre (...)
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  36. Hugh S. Chandler (1971). Constitutivity and Identity. Noûs 5 (3):313-319.score: 30.0
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  37. Hugh S. Chandler (1969). Shoemaker's Arguments Against Locke. Philosophical Quarterly 19 (76):263-265.score: 30.0
  38. Bret Chandler (2013). The Subjectivity of Habitus. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (4):469-491.score: 30.0
    Departing from Bourdieu's collective habitus, this essay develops a theory of the subjectivity of habitus, meaning the social-psychological processes comprising the agent and fueling deliberation. By incorporating George Ainslie's theory of the will and deliberation as the intertemporal bargaining of a population of interests, I theorize the “saturated agent” composed of an economy of interests, analogous to Bourdieu's “economy of practices” invested and saturated with cultural capital. Here culturally saturated interests negotiate strategically within the agent, with the ending balance constituting (...)
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  39. Hugh S. Chandler (1986). Sources of Essence. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 11 (1):379-389.score: 30.0
    Almost everyone believes in modality de dicto. Necessarily, puppies are young dogs. The necessity here derives from the meaning of “puppy.” The term means young dog. Essentialism is belief in a more exotic sort of modality, one that does not derive from meaning in this direct and simple way. In the first two sections of this paper, I consider indexical and nonindexical kind terms and the sort of modality applicable to each. In the last section, I consider individuals and proper (...)
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  40. José Marcos de Teresa (2012). Callejones sin salida: dos reconstrucciones de la respuesta al círculo cartesiano. Signos Filosóficos 14 (27):43-70.score: 30.0
    En este artículo explico el problema de la circularidad, tradicionalmente achacado a la metafísica cartesiana, destacando la importancia que, según Descartes, reviste esta cuestión. Argumento que las versiones del cartesianismo que ofrecen algunos de los comentarios más populares, utilizados en lengua castellana (los de Margaret Wilson y John Cottingham), resultan incompatibles con las posiciones que Descartes mantiene en una serie de textos. Teorías de ese corte sólo podrían justificarse por su valor filosófico intrínseco, pero también sostengo que ambas reconstrucciones presentan (...)
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  41. John H. Chandler (2010). Religious Reasons and Public Policy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):137-152.score: 30.0
    Most Liberals hold that public policies ought always be justifiable by reference to public reasons; that citizens should also refrain from advocacy in the absence of such reasons; and that exclusively religious reasons cannot be public reasons. This is challenged by Paul Weithman and Christopher Eberle. Both argue that basic liberal principles permit citizens in some circumstances to advance exclusively religious reasons, and in particular that Rawls's notions of reasonableness (Weithman) and the strains of commitment (Eberle) can be used in (...)
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  42. Hugh S. Chandler (1976). Plantinga and the Contingently Possible. Analysis 36 (2):106 - 109.score: 30.0
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  43. John H. Chandler (1973). Act-Utilitarianism and Collective Action. Ethics 84 (1):78-85.score: 30.0
  44. John Chandler (1984). Is the Divine Command Theory Defensible? Religious Studies 20 (3):443 - 452.score: 30.0
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  45. Hugh S. Chandler (1966). Three Kinds of Classses. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (Jan):77-188.score: 30.0
    This is a boiled down version of my doctoral dissertation. Ryle wouldn’t publish it, claiming that it is like ‘a well sharpened pencil that no one will ever use.’ I guess he turned out to be right. Nevertheless I think it was, and is, a good paper.
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  46. John Chandler (1985). Divine Command Theories and the Appeal to Love. American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (3):231 - 239.score: 30.0
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  47. John H. Chandler (1990). Killing and Letting Die - Putting the Debate in Context. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (4):420 – 431.score: 30.0
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  48. Hugh S. Chandler (1975). Hedonism. American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (3):223-233.score: 30.0
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