Search results for 'Terminal care Law and legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joan McCarthy (ed.) (2011). End-of-Life Care: Ethics and Law. Cork University Press.score: 214.0
     
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  2. Stefania Negri (ed.) (2012). Self-Determination, Dignity and End-of-Life Care: Regulating Advance Directives in International and Comparative Perspective. M. Nijhoff Pub..score: 158.0
    By providing an interdisciplinary reading of advance directives regulation in international, European and domestic law, this book offers new insights into the most controversial legal issues surrounding the debate over dignity and autonomy ...
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  3. Micheline Garel, Laurence Caeymaex, François Goffinet, Marina Cuttini & Monique Kaminski (2011). Ethically Complex Decisions in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Impact of the New French Legislation on Attitudes and Practices of Physicians and Nurses. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):240-243.score: 144.0
    Next SectionObjectives A statute enacted in 2005 modified the legislative framework of the rights of terminally ill persons in France. Ten years after the EURONIC study, which described the self-reported practices of neonatal caregivers towards ethical decision-making, a new study was conducted to assess the impact of the new law in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and compare the results reported by EURONIC with current practices. Setting and design The study was carried out in the same two NICU as (...)
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  4. Y. Michael Barilan (2007). The New Israeli Law on the Care of the Terminally Ill: Conceptual Innovations Waiting for Implementation. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (4):557-571.score: 135.0
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  5. Alan Jotkowitz & Avraham Steinberg (2006). Multiculturalism and End-of-Life Care: The New Israeli Law for the Terminally III Patient. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):17 – 19.score: 135.0
  6. Hamide Tacir (2011). Hastanın Kendi Geleceğini Belirleme Hakkı. Xii Levha.score: 132.0
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  7. Yi-Chen Su (forthcoming). When Ethical Reform Became Law: The Constitutional Concerns Raised by Recent Legislation in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101599.score: 118.0
    In an effort at ethical reform, Taiwan recently revised the Hospice Palliative Care Law authorising family members or physicians to make surrogate decisions to discontinue life-sustaining treatment if an incompetent terminally ill patient did not express their wishes while still competent. In particular, Article 7 of the new law authorises the palliative care team, namely the physicians, to act as sole decision-makers on behalf of the incompetent terminally ill patient's best interests if no family member is available. However, (...)
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  8. Mansoor Elahi (2011). Medical Ethics: A Practical Guide to Patient Care, Related Ethics, Conventions and Laws. Mtro Medical Publishing.score: 117.0
     
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  9. Sally Sheldon & Michael Thomson (eds.) (1998). Feminist Perspectives on Health Care Law. Cavendish Pub..score: 105.0
    This book brings together new work by some of the foremost writers in the health care law arena. It presents exciting new insights,drawing on feminist theory and methodology to further our understanding of health care law. Whilst the book makes a real contribution to both feminist debates and the analysis of this area of law, it is also accessible to the undergraduate student who is approaching this area of legal scholarship and feminist jurisprudence for the first time. Its (...)
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  10. Sheila McLean (2007). Impairment and Disability: Law and Ethics at the Beginning and End of Life. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 100.0
    pt. 1. Background you need. -- What is brain-compatible teaching -- The old and new of it -- When brain research is applied to the classroom everything will change -- Change can be easy -- We're not in Kansas anymore -- Where's the proof -- Tools for exploring the brain -- Ten reasons to care about brain research -- The evolution of brain models -- Be a brain-smart consumer: recognizing good research -- Action or theory: who wants to read (...)
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  11. Denis Berthiau (2013). Law, Bioethics and Practice in France: Forging a New Legislative Pact. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):105-113.score: 96.0
    In France, bioethics norms have emerged in close interaction with medical practices. The first bioethics laws were adopted in 1994, with provisions for updates in 2004 and most recently, in 2011. As in other countries, bioethics laws indirectly refer to certain fundamental values. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, I shall briefly describe the construction of the French bioethics laws and the values they are meant to protect. Secondly, I will show that the practice of clinical ethics, as (...)
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  12. Merja Kuuppelomäki (2002). The Decision-Making Process When Starting Terminal Care as Assessed by Nursing Staff. Nursing Ethics 9 (1):20-35.score: 96.0
    This article deals with making decisions about starting terminal care. The results are part of a larger survey on nurses’ conceptions of terminal care in community health centres in Finland. The importance, frequency and timing of decision making as well as communication and the number of investigations and procedures carried out are examined. The relationship between decision making and the size of a health centre’s catchment population is also discussed. The results make it possible to compare (...)
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  13. Lois L. Shepherd (2009). If That Ever Happens to Me: Making Life and Death Decisions After Terri Schiavo. University of North Carolina Press.score: 92.0
    Disorders of consciousness and the permanent vegetative state -- Legal and political wrangling over Terri's life -- In context--law and ethics -- Terri's wishes -- The limits of evidence -- The implications of surrogacy -- Qualities of life -- Feeding -- The preservation of life -- Respect and care : an alternative framework.
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  14. Y. Michael Barilan (2003). Revisiting the Problem of Jewish Bioethics: The Case of Terminal Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):141-168.score: 79.5
    : This paper examines the main Jewish sources relevant to end-of-life ethics, two Talmudic stories, the early modern code of law (Shulhan Aruch), and contemporary Halakhaic (religious law) responsa. Some Orthodox rabbis object to the use of artificial life support that prolongs the life of a dying patient and permit its active discontinuation when the patient is suffering. Other rabbis believe that every medical measure must be taken in order to prolong life. The context of the discussion is the recent (...)
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  15. Leonard M. Fleck (2011). Just Caring: Health Care Rationing, Terminal Illness, and the Medically Least Well Off. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):156-171.score: 75.0
    What does it mean to be a “just” and “caring” society in meeting the health care needs of the terminally ill when we have only limited resources to meet virtually unlimited health care needs? That question is the focus of this essay. Put another way: relative to all the other health care needs in our society, especially the need for lifesaving or life-prolonging health care, how high a priority ought the health care needs of persons (...)
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  16. Søren Holm (2008). Best Interests: What Problems in Family Law Should Health Care Law Avoid? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (3):252-254.score: 74.0
    This article comments briefly on three specific issues in Shazia Choudhry’s paper “‘Best Interests’ What can healthcare law learn from family law?” The three issues are: (1) the implications of ‘best interests’ and ‘welfare science’ for women within the family law and the health care law context, (2) the risk of capture by the ‘welfare science’ industry, and (3) the proposal that a committee of medical experts and medical ethicists should be set up to provide reports to the Court (...)
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  17. George P. Smith (1998). Terminal Sedation as Palliative Care: Revalidating a Right to a Good Death. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):382-387.score: 72.0
    Not everyone finds a in suffering. Indeed, even those who do subscribe to this interpretation recognize the responsibility of each individual to show not only sensitivity and compassion but render assistance to those in distress. Pharmacologic hypnosis, morphine intoxication, and terminal sedation provide their own type of medical to the terminally ill patient suffering unremitting pain. More and more states are enacting legislation that recognizes this need of the dying to receive relief through regulated administration of controlled substances. (...)
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  18. Judith Hendrick (2004). Law and Ethics. Nelson Thornes.score: 72.0
    Provides an insight into the general principles of the professional-patient relationship.
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  19. Stefan Höfler (2013). Between Conciseness and Transparency: Presuppositions in Legislative Texts. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-18.score: 72.0
    Presupposition is the semantic-pragmatic phenomenon whereby a statement contains an implicit precondition that must be taken for granted (presupposed) for that statement to be felicitous. This article discusses the role of presupposition in legislative texts, using examples from Swiss constitutional and administrative law. It illustrates (a) how presuppositions are triggered in these texts and (b) what functions they come to serve, placing special emphasis on their constitutive power. It also demonstrates (c) how legislative drafters can distinguish between “good” presuppositions and (...)
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  20. Charles Foster (2009). Choosing Life, Choosing Death: The Tyranny of Autonomy in Medical Ethics and Law. Hart Pub..score: 72.0
  21. Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.) (2008). Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
     
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  22. Mark Henaghan (2011). Health Professionals and Trust: The Cure for Healthcare Law and Policy. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 72.0
  23. Robert F. Rizzo (2000). Physician-Assisted Suicide in the United States: The Underlying Factors in Technology, Health Care and Palliative Medicine – Part One. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (3):277-289.score: 70.5
    In an age of rapid advances inlife-prolonging treatment, patients and caregivers areincreasingly facing tensions in making end-of-lifedecisions. An examination of the history of healthcare in the United States reveals technological,economic, and medical factors that have contributed tothe problems of terminal care and consequently to themovement of assisted suicide. The movement has itsroots in at least two fundamental perceptions andexpectations. In the age of technological medicineenergized by the profit motive, dying comes at a highprice in suffering and in personal (...)
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  24. Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.) (2010). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.score: 69.0
    The case of Terri Schiavo, a young woman who spent 15 years in a persistent vegetative state, has emerged as a watershed in debates over end-of-life care. While many observers had thought the right to refuse medical treatment was well established, this case split a family, divided a nation, and counfounded physicians, legislators, and many of the people they treated or represented. In renewing debates over the importance of advance directives, the appropriate role of artificial hydration and nutrition, and (...)
     
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  25. Ronald E. Cranford & A. Edward Doudera (eds.) (1984). Institutional Ethics Committees and Health Care Decision Making. Health Administration Press.score: 69.0
     
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  26. Jeanne Fitzpatrick (2010). A Better Way of Dying: How to Make the Best Choices at the End of Life. Penguin Books.score: 69.0
    Foreword -- Prologue -- Attorney Eileen Fitzpatrick -- Dr. Jeanne Fitzpatrick -- section 1. Death and dying in America -- 1. The need for change : the cautionary tale of Phyllis Shattuck -- Dr. Fitzpatrick tells Phyllis Shattuck's story -- Reflections -- How this book will help -- Lessons to learn -- New name, old concept -- 2. Your right to die -- Your right to die is born : the case of Karen Ann Quinlan -- The Supreme Court weights (...)
     
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  27. Hazel Biggs (2001). Euthanasia, Death with Dignity, and the Law. Hart Publishing.score: 66.0
    Machine generated contents note: Table of Cases xi -- Table of legislation xv -- Introduction: Medicine Men, Outlaws and Voluntary Euthanasia 1 -- 1. To Kill or not to Kill; is that the Euthanasia Question? 9 -- Introduction-Why Euthanasia? 9 -- Dead or alive? 16 -- Euthanasia as Homicide 25 -- Euthanasia as Death with Dignity 29 -- 2. Euthanasia and Clinically assisted Death: from Caring to Killing? 35 -- Introduction 35 -- The Indefinite Continuation of Palliative Treatment 38 (...)
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  28. Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny (2013). Narratives of 'Terminal Sedation', and the Importance of the Intention-Foresight Distinction in Palliative Care Practice. Bioethics 27 (1):1-11.score: 66.0
    The moral importance of the ‘intention–foresight’ distinction has long been a matter of philosophical controversy, particularly in the context of end-of-life care. Previous empirical research in Australia has suggested that general physicians and surgeons may use analgesic or sedative infusions with ambiguous intentions, their actions sometimes approximating ‘slow euthanasia’. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study of 18 Australian palliative care medical specialists, using in-depth interviews to address the use of sedation at the end of (...)
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  29. Viktoras Justickis & Vidmantas Egidijus Kurapka (2009). Criminogenic Security of Law in the EU and Lithuanian Legislation. Jurisprudence 117 (3):217-238.score: 66.0
    The study focuses on the phenomenon of crime-causing (criminogenic) law. It includes a review of related studies on such laws and their criminal side-effects, the change in the legislator’s liability for effects of enacted laws, and the effects of the legislator’s afflatus on the potential criminogenic effects of law. Of special concern are cases where the legislator is aware of the potential criminogenic side-effects of a new law but carelessly neglects them. The study evaluates the tool for detection of probable (...)
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  30. Virginia Held (2011). Morality, Care, and International Law. Ethics and Global Politics 4 (3).score: 64.0
    Whether we should respect international law is in dispute. In the United States, international law is dismissed by the left as merely promoting the interests of powerful states. It is attacked by the right as irrelevant and an interference with the interests and mission of the United States. And it follows from the arguments of many liberals that in the absence of world government the world is in a Hobbesian state of nature and international law inapplicable. This article reviews the (...)
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  31. Gentian Vyshka & Jera Kruja (2011). Inapplicability of Advance Directives in a Paternalistic Setting: The Case of a Post-Communist Health System. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):12-.score: 64.0
    Background: The Albanian medical system and Albanian health legislation have adopted a paternalistic position with regard to individual decision making. This reflects the practices of a not-so-remote past when state-run facilities and a totalitarian philosophy of medical care were politically imposed. Because of this history, advance directives concerning treatment refusal and do-not-resuscitate decisions are still extremely uncommon in Albania. Medical teams cannot abstain from intervening even when the patient explicitly and repeatedly solicits therapeutic abstinence. The Albanian law on (...)
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  32. Colleen M. Flood, Lance Gable & Lawrence O. Gostin (2005). Legislating and Litigating Health Care Rights Around the World. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):636-640.score: 63.0
  33. Steven C. Schachter (ed.) (2008). Managing Relationships with Industry: A Physician's Compliance Manual. Elsevier.score: 60.0
    Background -- Overview of legal sources -- Summary of recent prosecutions and investigations -- Applications of law and professional and trade association standards to physician relationships with industry -- Legal and ethical aspects of specific physician's industry financial relationships -- Approaching and adopting effective compliance plans.
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  34. Alireza Bagheri (2013). Medical Futility: A Cross-National Study. Imperial College Press.score: 60.0
    So-called futile care : the experience of the Unied States -- The reality of medical futility in Brazil -- Medical futility and end-of-lfe issues in Belgium -- The concept of medical futility in Venezuela -- Medical futility in Russian Federation -- Medical futility in Australia -- Medical futility in Japan -- Ethical issues and policy in medical futility in China -- Medical futility in Korea -- Medical futility from Swiss perspective -- Medical futility in Turkey -- Medical futility in (...)
     
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  35. Helga Varden (2012). A Kantian Critique of the Care Tradition: Family Law and Systemic Justice. Kantian Review 17 (2):327-356.score: 58.0
    Liberal theories of justice have been rightly criticized for two things by care theorists. First, they have failed to deal with private care relations’ inherent (inter)dependency, asymmetry and particularity. Second, they have been shown unable properly to address the asymmetry and dependency constitutive of care workers’ and care-receivers’ systemic conditions. I apply Kant’s theory of right to show that current care theories unfortunately reproduce similar problems because also they argue on the assumption that good (...) requires only virtuous private individuals. Giving up this assumption enables us to solve the problems regarding both private care relations and systemic injustice. (shrink)
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  36. Imre Szebik (2003). Masked Ball: Ethics, Laws and Financial Contradictions in Hungarian Health Care. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (1):109-124.score: 58.0
    Corruption is a major problem in the societies of the post-communist Central European countries. Corruption in health care has some unique characteristics undermining the efficacy of and respect for Hungarian health care. One of the forms of corruption is tipping. This highly contested phenomenon is present in most of the patient/health professional’s interactions in a sophisticated manner, raising serious ethical and legal dilemmas. The present paper analyzes tipping and other corruption-related factors, such as financial conflict of interest between (...)
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  37. Roberta M. Berry, Lisa Bliss, Sylvia Caley, Paul A. Lombardo & Leslie E. Wolf (2013). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Culture and Controversy. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (1):1-24.score: 58.0
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on controversy at the intersection of health care law and culture. The article addresses: emerging issues in federal regulatory oversight of the rapidly developing market in direct-to-consumer genetic testing, including questions about the role of government oversight and professional mediation of consumer choice; continuing controversies surrounding stem cell research and therapies and the implications of these controversies for healthcare institutions; a controversy in India arising at the intersection of (...)
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  38. Gary E. McCuen (1985/1988). Terminating Life: Conflicting Values in Health Care. Gary E. Mccuen Publications.score: 58.0
     
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  39. J. Savulescu (2013). Elective Ventilation and Interests. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):129-129.score: 57.0
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  40. Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.score: 57.0
     
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  41. Andrea Kemper, Michael Kölch, Heiner Fangerau & Jörg M. Fegert (2010). Ärztliche Schweigepflicht bei Kindeswohlgefährdung. Ethik in der Medizin 22 (1):33-47.score: 57.0
    Die Schweigepflicht, einer der Grundpfeiler medizinischer Ethik, spielt in der aktuellen Diskussion um die Verbesserung des Kinderschutzes eine zentrale Rolle. Unklare und mehrdeutige gesetzliche Regelungen und Handlungsanweisungen, wie mit Anhaltspunkten für eine Kindeswohlgefährdung umzugehen ist, wenn die Sorgeberechtigten eine weitergehende Hilfe ablehnen, werden als Hindernis für einen wirksamen Kinderschutz betrachtet. Aus der schwer durchschaubaren Rechtslage resultieren für Angehörige der Gesundheitsberufe regelmäßig Handlungsunsicherheiten, die im Einzelfall notwendige Hilfe verzögern oder gar verhindern könnten. Neue Gesetze auf Länderebene haben deshalb im Sinne eines (...)
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  42. David Larios Risco & Fernando Abellán-García Sánchez (eds.) (2009). Error Sanitario y Seguridad de Pacientes: Bases Jurídicas Para Un Registro de Sucesos Adversos En El Sistema Nacional de Salud. Comares.score: 57.0
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  43. Anne Rilliet Howald (2004). La Réforme des Régimes de Soins de Santé: Cadre International Et Communautaire, Thématiques Actuelles. Presses Universitaires d'Aix-Marseille.score: 57.0
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  44. Robert F. Weir (1989). Abating Treatment with Critically Ill Patients: Ethical and Legal Limits to the Medical Prolongation of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 57.0
    This book offers an in-depth analysis of the wide range of issues surrounding "passive euthanasia" and "allow-to-die" decisions. The author develops a comprehensive conceptual model that is highly useful for assessing and dealing with real-life situations. He presents an informative historical overview, an evaluation of the clinical settings in which treatment abatement takes place, and an insightful discussion of relevant legal aspects. The result is a clearly articulated ethical analysis that is medically realistic, philosophically sound, and legally viable.
     
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  45. Y. Tony Yang & Margaret M. Mahon (2012). Palliative Care for the Terminally Ill in America: The Consideration of QALYs, Costs, and Ethical Issues. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):411-416.score: 54.0
    The drive for cost-effective use of medical interventions has advantages, but can also be challenging in the context of end-of-life palliative treatments. A quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) provides a common currency to assess the extent of the benefits gained from a variety of interventions in terms of health-related quality of life and survival for the patient. However, since it is in the nature of end-of-life palliative care that the benefits it brings to its patients are of short duration, it fares (...)
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  46. M. Berry Roberta, Sylvia Caley Lisa Bliss, A. Lombardo Paul, Jonathan Todres Jerri Nims Rooker & E. Wolf Leslie (forthcoming). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Partners in Innovation. HEC Forum.score: 54.0
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on the engagement of law as a partner in health care innovation. The article addresses: the history and contents of recent United States federal law restricting the use of genetic information by insurers and employers; the recent federal policy recommending routine HIV testing; the recent revision of federal policy regarding the funding of human embryonic stem cell research; the history, current status, and need for future attention to advance (...)
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  47. Roberta Berry, Lisa Bliss, Sylvia Caley, Paul Lombardo, Jerri Rooker, Jonathan Todres & Leslie Wolf (2010). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Partners in Innovation. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (2):85-116.score: 54.0
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on the engagement of law as a partner in health care innovation. The article addresses: the history and contents of recent United States federal law restricting the use of genetic information by insurers and employers; the recent federal policy recommending routine HIV testing; the recent revision of federal policy regarding the funding of human embryonic stem cell research; the history, current status, and need for future attention to advance (...)
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  48. M. Strätling, V. E. Scharf & P. Schmucker (2004). Mental Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making Towards the End of Life. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):209-215.score: 54.0
    German legislation demands that decisions about the treatment of mentally incompetent patients require an ‘informed consent’. If this was not given by the patient him-/herself before he/she became incompetent, it has to be sought by the physician from a guardian, who has to be formally legitimized before. Additionally this surrogate has to seek the permission of a Court of Guardianship (Vormundschaftsgericht), if he/she intends to consent to interventions, which pose significant risks to the health or the life of the (...)
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  49. C. Cowley (2010). Justifying Terminal Care by 'Retrospective Quality-Adjusted Life-Years'. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):290-292.score: 54.0
    A lot of medical procedures can be justified in terms of the number of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) they can be expected to generate; that is, the number of extra years that the procedure will provide, with the quality of life during those extra years factored in. QALYs are a crude tool, but good enough for many decisions. Notoriously, however, they cannot justify spending any money on terminal care (and indeed on older people in general). In this paper I (...)
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  50. André den Exter (ed.) (2010). Human Rights and Biomedicine. Maklu.score: 54.0
     
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