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Search results for 'Terminal care Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. H. ten Have & David Clark (eds.) (2002). The Ethics of Palliative Care: European Perspectives. Open University Press.score: 993.0
    As palliative care develops across many of the countries of Europe, we find that it continues to raise important ethical challenges. Palliative care practice requires ethical sensitivity and understanding. At the same time the very existence of palliative care calls for ethical explanation. Ethics and palliative care meet over some vital issues: 'the good death', sedation at the end of life, requests for euthanasia, futile treatment, and the role of research. Yet palliative (...) appears uncertain about its goals and there is evidence that its ethical underpinnings are changing. Likewise, the moral problems of palliative care are only partly served by the four 'principles' of modern bioethics. This innovative book, with contributions by clinicians, ethicists, philosophers and social scientists, provides the first ever picture of palliative care ethics in the European context. It will be of interest to those involved in the delivery and management of palliative care services, as well as to students and researchers. (shrink)
     
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  2. Fiona Randall (1996). Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion. Oxford University Press.score: 943.0
    Palliative care is a recent branch of health care. The doctors, nurses, and other professionals involved in it took their inspiration from the medieval idea of the hospice, but have now extended their expertise to every area of health care: surgeries, nursing homes, acute wards, and the community. This has happened during a period when patients wish to take more control over their own lives and deaths, resources have become scarce, and technology has created controversial life-prolonging treatments. (...)
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  3. Robert F. Weir (1989). Abating Treatment with Critically Ill Patients: Ethical and Legal Limits to the Medical Prolongation of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 873.0
    This book offers an in-depth analysis of the wide range of issues surrounding "passive euthanasia" and "allow-to-die" decisions. The author develops a comprehensive conceptual model that is highly useful for assessing and dealing with real-life situations. He presents an informative historical overview, an evaluation of the clinical settings in which treatment abatement takes place, and an insightful discussion of relevant legal aspects. The result is a clearly articulated ethical analysis that is medically realistic, philosophically sound, and legally viable.
     
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  4. Joan McCarthy (ed.) (2011). End-of-Life Care: Ethics and Law. Cork University Press.score: 858.0
     
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  5. Gary E. McCuen (1985/1988). Terminating Life: Conflicting Values in Health Care. Gary E. Mccuen Publications.score: 858.0
     
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  6. D. Micah Hester (2010). End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective. Cambridge University Press.score: 843.0
    Crito revisited -- Blindness, narrative, and meaning : moral living -- Radical experience and tragic duty : moral dying -- Needing assistance to die well : PAS and beyond -- Experiencing lost voices : dying without capacity -- Dying young : what interests do children have? -- Caring for patients : cure, palliation, comfort, and aid in the process of dying.
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  7. John Keown (2002). Euthanasia, Ethics, and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legalisation. Cambridge University Press.score: 813.0
    Whether the law should permit voluntary euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is one of the most vital questions facing all modern societies. Internationally, the main obstacle to legalisation has proved to be the objection that, even if they were morally acceptable in certain 'hard cases', voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide could not be effectively controlled; society would slide down a 'slippery slope' to the killing of patients who did not make a free and informed request, or for whom palliative care (...)
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  8. Gabriel Wolf Oselka & Reinaldo Ayer de Oliveira (eds.) (2005). Doente Terminal, Destino de Pré-Embriões, Clonagem, Meio Ambiente. Conselho Regional de Medicina Do Estado de São Paulo.score: 813.0
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  9. Robert F. Weir (ed.) (1986). Ethical Issues in Death and Dying. Columbia University Press.score: 813.0
     
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  10. Sheila McLean (2007). Impairment and Disability: Law and Ethics at the Beginning and End of Life. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 798.0
    pt. 1. Background you need. -- What is brain-compatible teaching -- The old and new of it -- When brain research is applied to the classroom everything will change -- Change can be easy -- We're not in Kansas anymore -- Where's the proof -- Tools for exploring the brain -- Ten reasons to care about brain research -- The evolution of brain models -- Be a brain-smart consumer: recognizing good research -- Action or theory: who wants to read (...)
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  11. Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.) (2010). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.score: 798.0
    The case of Terri Schiavo, a young woman who spent 15 years in a persistent vegetative state, has emerged as a watershed in debates over end-of-life care. While many observers had thought the right to refuse medical treatment was well established, this case split a family, divided a nation, and counfounded physicians, legislators, and many of the people they treated or represented. In renewing debates over the importance of advance directives, the appropriate role of artificial hydration and nutrition, and (...)
     
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  12. Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.score: 783.0
     
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  13. Kenneth J. Doka (ed.) (2012). End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach. Hospice Foundation of America.score: 783.0
     
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  14. Mario Coltorti (ed.) (2004). Medicina Ed Etica di Fine Vita: Atti Del Convegno, Napoli, 22-24 Aprile 2004. Giannini.score: 768.0
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  15. Hamide Tacir (2011). Hastanın Kendi Geleceğini Belirleme Hakkı. Xii Levha.score: 768.0
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  16. Ping Wang (2005). Si Wang Yu Yi Xue Lun Li. Wuhan da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 768.0
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  17. Richard Hull, Philosophical, Ethical, and Moral Aspects of Health Care Rationing: A Review of Daniel Callahan's Setting Limits. [REVIEW]score: 600.0
    My assigned task in today’s colloquium is to review philosophers’ perspectives on the broad question of whether health care rationing ought to target the elderly. This is a revolutionary question, particularly in a society that is so sensitive to apparent discrimination, and the question must be approached carefully if it is to be successfully dealt with. Three subordinate questions attend this one and must be addressed in the course of answering it. The first such question has to do (...)
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  18. Gary Duhon (2008). An Uncomfortable Refusal Pp. 15-15 HTML Version | PDF Version (78k) Subject Headings: Premature Infants -- Medical Care -- Moral and Ethical Aspects. Commentary. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 15-16.score: 590.4
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  19. Suzanne Shale (2012). Moral Leadership in Medicine: Building Ethical Healthcare Organizations. Cambridge University Press.score: 585.6
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Why medicine needs moral leaders; 2. Creating an organizational narrative; 3. Understanding normative expectations in medical moral leadership; Prologue to chapters four and five; 4. Expressing fiduciary, bureaucratic and collegial propriety; 5. Expressing inquisitorial and restorative propriety; Epilogue to chapters four and five; 6. Understanding organizational moral narrative; 7. Moral leadership for ethical organizations; Appendix 1. How the research was done; Appendix 2. Accountability for clinical performance: individuals and (...)
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  20. Ruth Macklin (1999). Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 477.6
    This book provides an analysis of the debate surrounding cultural diversity, and attempts to reconcile the seemingly opposing views of "ethical imperialism," the belief that each individual is entitled to fundamental human rights, and cultural relativism, the belief that ethics must be relative to particular cultures and societies. The author examines the role of cultural tradition, often used as a defense against critical ethical judgments. Key issues in health and medicine are explored in the context of cultural diversity: (...)
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  21. George J. Agich (1993). Autonomy and Long-Term Care. Oxford University Press.score: 477.6
    The realities and myths of long-term care and the challenges it poses for the ethics of autonomy are analyzed in this perceptive work. The book defends the concept of autonomy, but argues that the standard view of autonomy as non-interference and independence has only a limited applicability for long term care. The treatment of actual autonomy stresses the developmental and social nature of human persons and the priority of identification over autonomous choice. The work balances analysis of the (...)
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  22. Samuel Gorovitz (1991/1993). Drawing the Line: Life, Death, and Ethical Choices in an American Hospital. Temple University Press.score: 477.6
    In 1985, philosopher Samuel Gorovitz spent seven weeks at Boston's Beth Israel, one of the nation's premier teaching hospitals, where he was given free run as "Authorized Snoop and Irritant-at-Large." In Drawing the Line, he provides an intense, disturbing, and insightful account of his observations during those seven weeks. Gorovitz guides us through an operating room and intensive care units, and takes us to meetings where surgeons discuss the mishaps of the preceding week, where internists map out their approaches (...)
     
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  23. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.score: 453.6
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  24. Fiona Randall (2006). The Philosophy of Palliative Care: Critique and Reconstruction. Oxford University Press.score: 441.6
    It is a philosophy of patient care, and is therefore open to critique and evaluation.Using the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine Third Edition as their ...
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  25. Guy Lebeer (ed.) (2002). Ethical Function in Hospital Ethics Committees. Ios Press.score: 441.6
    IOS Prexs, 2002 Introduction This book is the final project report of the BIOMED II project Ethical Function in Hospital Ethics Committees Commission,-2001 ...
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  26. D. Wilkinson (2013). Three Myths in End-of-Life Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):389-390.score: 433.6
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  27. Mary Briody Mahowald (2006). Bioethics and Women: Across the Life Span. Oxford University Press.score: 417.6
    All persons, while different from one another, have the same value: this is the author's relatively uncontroversial starting point. Her end point is not uncontroversial: an ideal of justice as human flourishing, based on each person's unique set of capabilities. Because the book's focus is women's health care, gender justice, a necessary component of justice, is central to examination of the issues. Classical pragmatists and feminist standpoint theorists are enlisted in support of a strategy by which gender justice is (...)
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  28. Christopher Dowrick & Lucy Frith (eds.) (1999). General Practice and Ethics: Uncertainty and Responsibility. Routledge.score: 417.6
    Explores the ethical issues faced by GPs in their everyday practice, addressing two central themes; the uncertainty of outcomes and effectiveness in general practice and the changing pattern of general practitioners' responsibilities.
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  29. Lilie Chouliaraki (2006). The Spectatorship of Suffering. Sage Publications.score: 417.6
    "The work is on an important topic that has been oft debated but rarely systematically studied – the political, cultural, and moral effects of distant news coverage of suffering. [The book] is extremely well steeped in the relevant literature, including semiotics, discourse analysis, meda and social theory and makes a fresh methodological contribution by looking at the codes and formats of news about suffering. It has a fresh vision and answer to some of the stickiest moral and media (...)
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  30. Norman Daniels (2008). Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly. Cambridge University Press.score: 405.6
    In this new book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: What is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? The theory has implications for national and global health policy: Can we meet health needs fairly in aging societies? Or protect health in the workplace while respecting individual (...)
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  31. D. Micah Hester (ed.) (2008). Ethics by Committee: A Textbook on Consultation, Organization, and Education for Hospital Ethics Committees. Rowman & Littlefield Pub..score: 405.6
     
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  32. Margaret Monahan Hogan & David Solomon (eds.) (2007/2008). Medical Ethics at Notre Dame: The J. Philip Clarke Family Lectures, 1988-1999. [South Bend, Ind.?]The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture.score: 405.6
     
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  33. Margaret Monahan Hogan & David Solomon (eds.) (2007/2008). Medical Ethics at Notre Dame: The J. [South Bend, Ind.?]The Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture.score: 405.6
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  34. S. Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.score: 405.0
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing (...)
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  35. S. Van der Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.score: 405.0
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing (...)
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  36. J. Hardwig (1992). The Problem of Proxies with Interests of Their Own: Toward a Better Theory of Proxy Decisions. Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (1):20-27.score: 397.6
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  37. William Colby, Constance Dahlin, John Lantos, John Carney & Myra Christopher (2010). The National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines Domain 8: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (2):117-131.score: 396.0
    In 2001, leaders with palliative care convened to discuss the standardization of palliative care and formed the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. In 2004, the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care produced the first edition of Clinical Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. The Guidelines were developed by leaders in the field who examined other national and international standards with the intent to promote consistent, accessible, comprehensive, optimal palliative care through the health (...)
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  38. Susan B. Rubin (1998). When Doctors Say No: The Battleground of Medical Futility. Indiana University Press.score: 393.6
    Who should decide? In When Doctors Say No, philosopher and bioethicist Rubin examines this controversial issue.
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  39. Dominic Wilkinson (2013). Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children. Oxford University Press.score: 393.6
    Death and grief in the ancient world -- Predictions and disability in Rome.
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  40. Robert T. Hall (2008). Bioética Institucional: Problemas y Prácticas En Las Organizaciones Para El Cuidado de la Salud. Distribuciones Fontamara.score: 393.6
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  41. Julia Inthorn (ed.) (2010). Richtlinien, Ethikstandards Und Kritisches Korrektiv: Eine Topographie Ethischen Nachdenkens Im Kontext der Medizin. Edition Ruprecht.score: 393.6
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  42. Jane Stein (1978). Making Medical Choices: Who is Responsible? Houghton Mifflin.score: 393.6
     
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  43. Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.) (2008). Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 381.6
    The entwined history of humans and elephants is fascinating but often sad. People have used elephants as beasts of burden and war machines, slaughtered them for their ivory, exterminated them as threats to people and ecosystems, turned them into objects of entertainment at circuses, employed them as both curiosities and conservation ambassadors in zoos, and deified and honored them in religious rites. How have such actions affected these pachyderms? What ethical and moral imperatives should humans follow to ensure (...)
     
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  44. Simon Robinson (2007). Spirituality, Ethics, and Care. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.score: 377.6
    Ethics, religion, and spirituality -- Spirituality in care -- Spirituality and ethics -- Love -- The community of care : fit for purpose -- Values, virtues, and the patient -- Challenging faith -- Spirituality and the domain of justice.
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  45. Fiona Robinson (2011). The Ethics of Care: A Feminist Approach to Human Security. Temple University Press.score: 377.6
    Introduction -- The ethics of care and global politics -- Rethinking human security -- 'Women's work' : the global care and sex economies -- Humanitarian intervention and global security governance -- Peacebuilding and paternalism : reading care through postcolonialism -- Health and human security : gender, care and HIV/AIDS -- Gender, care, and the ethics of environmental security -- Conclusion. Security through care.
     
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  46. Petra Gelhaus (2013). The Desired Moral Attitude of the Physician: (III) Care. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):125-139.score: 372.8
    In professional medical ethics, the physician traditionally is obliged to fulfil specific duties as well as to embody a responsible and trustworthy personality. In the public discussion, different concepts are suggested to describe the desired moral attitude of physicians. In a series of three articles, three of the discussed concepts are presented in an interpretation that is meant to characterise the morally emotional part of this attitude: “empathy”, “compassion” and “care”. In the first article of the series, “empathy” (...)
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  47. Hugh Upton (2011). Moral Theory and Theorizing in Health Care Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):431-443.score: 372.0
    This paper takes up the question of the role of philosophical moral theory in our attempts to resolve the ethical problems that arise in health care, with particular reference to the contention that we need theory to be determinative of our choice of actions. Moral theorizing is distinguished from moral theories and the prospects for determinacy from the latter are examined through a consideration of the most promising candidates: utilitarianism, deontology and the procedures involved in (...)
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  48. Joan Poliner Shapiro (2001). Ethical Leadership and Decision Making in Education: Applying Theoretical Perspectives to Complex Dilemmas. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 369.6
    The authors developed this textbook in response to an increasing interest in ethics, and a growing number of courses on this topic that are now being offered in educational leadership programs. It is designed to fill a gap in instructional materials for teaching the ethics component of the knowledge base that has been established for the profession. The text has several purposes: First, it demonstrates the application of different ethical paradigms (the ethics of justice, care, critique, and the (...)
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  49. A. Pablo Iannone (ed.) (1987). Contemporary Moral Controversies in Technology. Oxford University Press.score: 369.6
    As space satellites orbit the earth on a regular basis and scientists find more sophisticated ways to splice genes, we are all faced with the responsiblity of reconciling the lengths to which technology must comply with morality. This book presents a variety of moral controversies of concern in this day and age of technological advancement. The contributors study a wide range of relevant topics such as: current technological development and the ethical inquiries it prompts; risk-cost benefit analysis and (...)
     
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  50. Mildred Z. Solomon & Ann Bonham (eds.) (2013). Ethical Oversight of Learning Health Care Systems. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 369.6
     
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