Search results for 'Terminal care Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  49
    Gary Duhon (2008). An Uncomfortable Refusal Pp. 15-15 HTML Version | PDF Version (78k) Subject Headings: Premature Infants -- Medical Care -- Moral and Ethical Aspects. Commentary. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 15-16.
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  2. H. ten Have & David Clark (eds.) (2002). The Ethics of Palliative Care: European Perspectives. Open University Press.
    As palliative care develops across many of the countries of Europe, we find that it continues to raise important ethical challenges. Palliative care practice requires ethical sensitivity and understanding. At the same time the very existence of palliative care calls for ethical explanation. Ethics and palliative care meet over some vital issues: 'the good death', sedation at the end of life, requests for euthanasia, futile treatment, and the role of research. Yet palliative (...) appears uncertain about its goals and there is evidence that its ethical underpinnings are changing. Likewise, the moral problems of palliative care are only partly served by the four 'principles' of modern bioethics. This innovative book, with contributions by clinicians, ethicists, philosophers and social scientists, provides the first ever picture of palliative care ethics in the European context. It will be of interest to those involved in the delivery and management of palliative care services, as well as to students and researchers. (shrink)
     
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  3.  21
    Richard Hull, Philosophical, Ethical, and Moral Aspects of Health Care Rationing: A Review of Daniel Callahan's Setting Limits. [REVIEW]
    My assigned task in today’s colloquium is to review philosophers’ perspectives on the broad question of whether health care rationing ought to target the elderly. This is a revolutionary question, particularly in a society that is so sensitive to apparent discrimination, and the question must be approached carefully if it is to be successfully dealt with. Three subordinate questions attend this one and must be addressed in the course of answering it. The first such question has to do with (...)
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  4. Robert F. Weir (1989). Abating Treatment with Critically Ill Patients: Ethical and Legal Limits to the Medical Prolongation of Life. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers an in-depth analysis of the wide range of issues surrounding "passive euthanasia" and "allow-to-die" decisions. The author develops a comprehensive conceptual model that is highly useful for assessing and dealing with real-life situations. He presents an informative historical overview, an evaluation of the clinical settings in which treatment abatement takes place, and an insightful discussion of relevant legal aspects. The result is a clearly articulated ethical analysis that is medically realistic, philosophically sound, and legally viable.
     
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  5.  68
    Fiona Randall (1996). Palliative Care Ethics: A Good Companion. Oxford University Press.
    Palliative care is a recent branch of health care. The doctors, nurses, and other professionals involved in it took their inspiration from the medieval idea of the hospice, but have now extended their expertise to every area of health care: surgeries, nursing homes, acute wards, and the community. This has happened during a period when patients wish to take more control over their own lives and deaths, resources have become scarce, and technology has created controversial life-prolonging treatments. (...)
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  6.  6
    D. Micah Hester (2010). End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective. Cambridge University Press.
    Crito revisited -- Blindness, narrative, and meaning : moral living -- Radical experience and tragic duty : moral dying -- Needing assistance to die well : PAS and beyond -- Experiencing lost voices : dying without capacity -- Dying young : what interests do children have? -- Caring for patients : cure, palliation, comfort, and aid in the process of dying.
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  7. Robert F. Weir (ed.) (1986). Ethical Issues in Death and Dying. Columbia University Press.
     
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  8. Joan McCarthy (ed.) (2011). End-of-Life Care: Ethics and Law. Cork University Press.
     
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  9. Gary E. McCuen (1985/1988). Terminating Life: Conflicting Values in Health Care. Gary E. Mccuen Publications.
     
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  10. Gabriel Wolf Oselka & Reinaldo Ayer de Oliveira (eds.) (2005). Doente Terminal, Destino de Pré-Embriões, Clonagem, Meio Ambiente. Conselho Regional de Medicina Do Estado de São Paulo.
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  11. John Keown (2002). Euthanasia, Ethics, and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legalisation. Cambridge University Press.
    Whether the law should permit voluntary euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is one of the most vital questions facing all modern societies. Internationally, the main obstacle to legalisation has proved to be the objection that, even if they were morally acceptable in certain 'hard cases', voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide could not be effectively controlled; society would slide down a 'slippery slope' to the killing of patients who did not make a free and informed request, or for whom palliative care (...)
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  12. Kenneth W. Goodman (ed.) (2010). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics, Politics, and Death in the 21st Century. Oxford University Press.
    The case of Terri Schiavo, a young woman who spent 15 years in a persistent vegetative state, has emerged as a watershed in debates over end-of-life care. While many observers had thought the right to refuse medical treatment was well established, this case split a family, divided a nation, and counfounded physicians, legislators, and many of the people they treated or represented. In renewing debates over the importance of advance directives, the appropriate role of artificial hydration and nutrition, and (...)
     
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  13.  4
    Sheila McLean (2007). Impairment and Disability: Law and Ethics at the Beginning and End of Life. Routledge-Cavendish.
    pt. 1. Background you need. -- What is brain-compatible teaching -- The old and new of it -- When brain research is applied to the classroom everything will change -- Change can be easy -- We're not in Kansas anymore -- Where's the proof -- Tools for exploring the brain -- Ten reasons to care about brain research -- The evolution of brain models -- Be a brain-smart consumer: recognizing good research -- Action or theory: who wants to read (...)
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  14.  44
    Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.
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  15. Mario Coltorti (ed.) (2004). Medicina Ed Etica di Fine Vita: Atti Del Convegno, Napoli, 22-24 Aprile 2004. Giannini.
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  16. Kenneth J. Doka (ed.) (2012). End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach. Hospice Foundation of America.
     
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  17. Hamide Tacir (2011). Hastanın Kendi Geleceğini Belirleme Hakkı. Xii Levha.
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  18. Ping Wang (2005). Si Wang Yu Yi Xue Lun Li. Wuhan da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  19.  16
    Suzanne Shale (2012). Moral Leadership in Medicine: Building Ethical Healthcare Organizations. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Why medicine needs moral leaders; 2. Creating an organizational narrative; 3. Understanding normative expectations in medical moral leadership; Prologue to chapters four and five; 4. Expressing fiduciary, bureaucratic and collegial propriety; 5. Expressing inquisitorial and restorative propriety; Epilogue to chapters four and five; 6. Understanding organizational moral narrative; 7. Moral leadership for ethical organizations; Appendix 1. How the research was done; Appendix 2. Accountability (...)
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  20. Norman Daniels (2008). Just Health: Meeting Health Needs Fairly. Cambridge University Press.
    In this new book by the award-winning author of Just Healthcare, Norman Daniels develops a comprehensive theory of justice for health that answers three key questions: What is the special moral importance of health? When are health inequalities unjust? How can we meet health needs fairly when we cannot meet them all? The theory has implications for national and global health policy: Can we meet health needs fairly in aging societies? Or protect health in the workplace while (...)
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  21.  10
    William Colby, Constance Dahlin, John Lantos, John Carney & Myra Christopher (2010). The National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines Domain 8: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (2):117-131.
    In 2001, leaders with palliative care convened to discuss the standardization of palliative care and formed the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. In 2004, the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care produced the first edition of Clinical Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. The Guidelines were developed by leaders in the field who examined other national and international standards with the intent to promote consistent, accessible, comprehensive, optimal palliative care through the health (...)
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  22.  93
    Ruth Macklin (1999). Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    This book provides an analysis of the debate surrounding cultural diversity, and attempts to reconcile the seemingly opposing views of "ethical imperialism," the belief that each individual is entitled to fundamental human rights, and cultural relativism, the belief that ethics must be relative to particular cultures and societies. The author examines the role of cultural tradition, often used as a defense against critical ethical judgments. Key issues in health and medicine are explored in the context of (...)
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  23.  2
    M. R. N. Bruijnis, V. Blok, E. N. Stassen & H. G. J. Gremmen (2015). Moral “Lock-In” in Responsible Innovation: The Ethical and Social Aspects of Killing Day-Old Chicks and Its Alternatives. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):939-960.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework that will help in understanding and evaluating, along social and ethical lines, the issue of killing day-old male chicks and two alternative directions of responsible innovations to solve this issue. The following research questions are addressed: Why is the killing of day-old chicks morally problematic? Are the proposed alternatives morally sound? To what extent do the alternatives lead to responsible innovation? The conceptual framework demonstrates clearly that there (...)
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  24.  38
    George J. Agich (1993). Autonomy and Long-Term Care. Oxford University Press.
    The realities and myths of long-term care and the challenges it poses for the ethics of autonomy are analyzed in this perceptive work. The book defends the concept of autonomy, but argues that the standard view of autonomy as non-interference and independence has only a limited applicability for long term care. The treatment of actual autonomy stresses the developmental and social nature of human persons and the priority of identification over autonomous choice. The work balances analysis of the (...)
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  25. Samuel Gorovitz (1991/1993). Drawing the Line: Life, Death, and Ethical Choices in an American Hospital. Temple University Press.
    In 1985, philosopher Samuel Gorovitz spent seven weeks at Boston's Beth Israel, one of the nation's premier teaching hospitals, where he was given free run as "Authorized Snoop and Irritant-at-Large." In Drawing the Line, he provides an intense, disturbing, and insightful account of his observations during those seven weeks. Gorovitz guides us through an operating room and intensive care units, and takes us to meetings where surgeons discuss the mishaps of the preceding week, where internists map out their approaches (...)
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  26.  5
    W. J. Ellenchild Pinch & Mary E. Parsons (1997). Moral Orientation of Elderly Persons: Considering Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care. Nursing Ethics 4 (5):380-393.
    Knowledge about moral development and elderly persons is very limited. A hermeneutical interpretative study was conducted with healthy elderly persons (n = 20) in order to explore and describe their moral orientation based on the paradigms of justice (Kohlberg) and care (Gilligan). The types of moral reasoning, dominance, alignment and orientation were determined. All but one participant included both types of reasoning when discussing an ethical conflict. None of the men’s moral reasoning was dominated (...)
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  27.  12
    H. Colby William, John Lantos Constance Dahlin & Myra Christopher John Carney (forthcoming). The National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines Domain 8: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care. HEC Forum.
    In 2001, leaders with palliative care convened to discuss the standardization of palliative care and formed the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. In 2004, the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care produced the first edition of Clinical Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. The Guidelines were developed by leaders in the field who examined other national and international standards with the intent to promote consistent, accessible, comprehensive, optimal palliative care through the health (...)
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  28.  3
    Thomas J. Simpson (1999). Response to “Neonatal Viability in the 1990s: Held Hostage by Technology” by Jonathan Muraskas Et Al. And “Giving 'Moral Distress' a Voice: Ethical Concerns Among Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Personnel” by Pam Hefferman and Steve Heilig. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):524-526.
    Muraskas et al. and Hefferman and Heilig present the painfully elusive ethical questions regarding decisionmaking in the care of the extremely low birth weight infants in the intensive care nursery. At what gestation or size do we resuscitate? Can we stop resuscitation after we have started? How much money is too much to spend? Is the distress of the parents of the ELBW infant, the anguish of their caregivers, and the moral and ethical uncertainty of (...)
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  29.  2
    R. N. MadeleineLeininger & C. T. N. O. (1990). Culture: The Conspicuous Missing Link to Understand Ethical and Moral Dimensions of Human Care. In Madeleine M. Leininger (ed.), Ethical and Moral Dimensions of Care. Wayne State University Press 49.
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  30.  3
    W. E. Pinch & M. Parsons (1997). Moral Orientation of Elderly Persons:: Considering Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care. Nursing Ethics 4 (5):380-393.
    Knowledge about moral development and elderly persons is very limited. A hermeneutical interpretative study was conducted with healthy elderly persons in order to explore and describe their moral orientation based on the paradigms of justice and care . The types of moral reasoning, dominance, alignment and orientation were determined. All but one participant included both types of reasoning when discussing an ethical conflict. None of the men’s moral reasoning was dominated by caring, but justice (...)
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  31. Thomas Simpson (1999). Response to “Neonatal Viability in the 1990s: Held Hostage by Technology” by Jonathan Muraskas Et Al. And “Giving ‘Moral Distress’ a Voice: Ethical Concerns Among Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Personnel” by Pam Hefferman and Steve Heilig - Navigating Turbulent and Uncharted Waters. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):524-526.
    Muraskas et al. and Hefferman and Heilig present the painfully elusive ethical questions regarding decisionmaking in the care of the extremely low birth weight infants in the intensive care nursery. At what gestation or size do we resuscitate? Can we stop resuscitation after we have started? How much money is too much to spend? Is the distress of the parents of the ELBW infant, the anguish of their caregivers, and the moral and ethical uncertainty of (...)
     
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  32.  42
    Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  33.  26
    Fiona Randall (2006). The Philosophy of Palliative Care: Critique and Reconstruction. Oxford University Press.
    It is a philosophy of patient care, and is therefore open to critique and evaluation.Using the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine Third Edition as their ...
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  34.  13
    Guy Lebeer (ed.) (2002). Ethical Function in Hospital Ethics Committees. Ios Press.
    IOS Prexs, 2002 Introduction This book is the final project report of the BIOMED II project Ethical Function in Hospital Ethics Committees Commission,-2001 ...
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  35.  13
    D. Wilkinson (2013). Three Myths in End-of-Life Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):389-390.
    Huang and colleagues provide some intriguing insights into the attitudes about end of life care of practising Taiwanese neonatal doctors and nurses.1 There are some similarities with surveys from other parts of the world. Most Taiwanese neonatologists and nurses agreed that it was potentially appropriate to withhold or limit treatment for infants who were dying. A very high proportion was opposed to active euthanasia of such infants. But there were also some striking differences. Only 21% of Taiwanese doctors ‘agreed’ (...)
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  36. Mildred Z. Solomon & Ann Bonham (eds.) (2013). Ethical Oversight of Learning Health Care Systems. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  37.  7
    S. Woods, K. Beaver & K. Luker (2000). Users' Views of Palliative Care Services: Ethical Implications. Nursing Ethics 7 (4):314-326.
    This article is based on the findings of a study that elicited the views of terminally ill patients (n = 15), their carers (n = 10) and bereaved carers (n = 19) on the palliative care services they received. It explores the range of ethical issues revealed by the data. Although the focus of the original study was on community services, the participants frequently commented on all aspects of their experience. They described some of its positive and (...)
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  38.  1
    M. W. Ross (1989). Psychosocial Ethical Aspects of AIDS. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (2):74-81.
    The psychosocial morbidity associated with HIV infection and responses to such infection may exceed morbidity associated with medical sequelae of such infection. This paper argues that negative judgements on those with HIV infection or in groups associated with such infection will cause avoidable psychological and social distress. Moral judgements made regarding HIV infection may also harm the common good by promoting conditions which may increase the spread of HIV infection. This paper examines these two lines of argument with regard (...)
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  39.  1
    Faith Gibson (2011). Ethical Aspects in Children's and Young People's Cancer Care: Professional Views. In Gosia M. Brykczyńska & Joan Simons (eds.), Ethical and Philosophical Aspects of Nursing Children and Young People. John Wiley & Sons 164.
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  40.  2
    M. Morrissey (1997). Extending the Theory of Awareness Contexts by Examining the Ethical Issues Faced by Nurses in Terminal Care. Nursing Ethics 4 (5):370-379.
    The breaking of bad news in a hospital setting, particularly to patients in a terminal condition, highlights some complex and often emotive ethical issues for nurses. One theory that examines the way in which individuals react to bad news such as a terminal illness, is the theory of awareness contexts. However, this theory may be limited by failing to recognize the complexity of the situation and the ethical issues involved for nurses caring for terminally ill patients. (...)
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  41. Yvonne Dexter (2011). Ethical Aspects of Care of the Adolescent. In Gosia M. Brykczyńska & Joan Simons (eds.), Ethical and Philosophical Aspects of Nursing Children and Young People. John Wiley & Sons 100.
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  42.  10
    Muriel J. Bebeau & Mary M. Brabeck (1987). Integrating Care and Justice Issues in Professional Moral Education: A Gender Perspective. Journal of Moral Education 16 (3):189-203.
    Abstract This study examines gender differences in professional school students? ethical sensitivity and moral reasoning, two aspects of Rest's four?component model of moral development. Results indicate that men and women dental students differ in general sensitivity to ethical issues, but not in recognition of issues of care or justice, nor in moral reasoning. Our results contribute to a re?interpretation of Gilligan's gender?difference arguments, and suggest new directions for research in moral development.
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  43.  6
    S. Salloch & C. Breitsameter (2010). Morality and Moral Conflicts in Hospice Care: Results of a Qualitative Interview Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (10):588-592.
    Hospices consider themselves places that practise a holistic form of terminal care, encompassing physical and psychological symptoms, and also the social and spiritual support for a dying patient. So far, the underlying ethical principles have been treated predominantly in terms of a normative theoretical discussion. The interview study discussed in this paper is a qualitative investigation into general and hospice-related conceptions of morality among full-time and voluntary workers in German inpatient hospices. It examines moral conflicts and (...)
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  44.  69
    Fiona Robinson (2006). Care, Gender and Global Social Justice: Rethinking 'Ethical Globalization'. Journal of Global Ethics 2 (1):5 – 25.
    This article develops an approach to ethical globalization based on a feminist, political ethic of care; this is achieved, in part, through a comparison with, and critique of, Thomas Pogge's World Poverty and Human Rights. In his book, Pogge makes the valid and important argument that the global economic order is currently organized such that developed countries have a huge advantage in terms of power and expertise, and that decisions are reached purely and exclusively through self-interest. Pogge uses (...)
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  45.  3
    Vasil Gluchman (2013). Pious Aspects in the Ethical and Moral Views of Matthias Bel. History of European Ideas 39 (6):776-790.
    Summary The author of the paper studies the ethical views of Matthias Bel expressed in his Preface to Johann Arndt's treatise and in Davidian-Solomonian Ethics, which contain a critique of false Christianity and ancient (especially Aristotle's) ethics. Bel refuses any philosophical ethics based on human nature, since man, in his very essence, is sinful and vicious. This leads to the general moral downfall of the young and mankind. He only recognises ethics whose source and the highest (...)
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  46. Karen Harrison-White (2011). Withholding and Withdrawal of Treatment: Ethical, Legal and Philosophical Aspects of Paediatric Intensive Care Nursing. In Gosia M. Brykczyńska & Joan Simons (eds.), Ethical and Philosophical Aspects of Nursing Children and Young People. John Wiley & Sons 173.
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  47.  5
    S. Van der Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing (...)
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  48.  17
    S. Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing (...)
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  49.  1
    T. -Y. Chiu (2000). Ethical Dilemmas in Palliative Care: A Study in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):353-357.
    Objectives—To investigate the incidence and solution of ethical dilemmas in a palliative care unit.Design—Health care workers recorded daily all dilemmas in caring for each patient.Setting—Palliative care unit of National Taiwan University Hospital in Taiwan.Patients—Two hundred and forty-six consecutive patients with terminal cancer during 1997-8.Main measurement—Ethical dilemmas in the questionnaire were categorised as follows: telling the truth; place of care; therapeutic strategy; hydration and nutrition; blood transfusion; alternative treatment; terminal sedation; use of medication, (...)
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  50.  9
    Kevin McGovern (2008). Ethical Aspects of Advance Care Planning. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 14 (2):1.
    McGovern, Kevin On 12 November 2008, the Caroline Chisholm Centre for Health Ethics ran a conference on Advance Care Planning. This is the Director's talk from that conference.
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