Search results for 'Tetsurō Watsuji' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Watsuji Tetsuro (1996). Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan. State University of New York Press.score: 1080.0
    Watsuji's Rinrigaku (literally, the principles that allow us to live in friendly community) has been regarded as the definitive study of Japanese ethics for half a century.
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  2. Watsuji Tetsurō (2008). Extraits de Fūdo. Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 64 (2):327-344.score: 300.0
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  3. Watsuji Tetsurō (2008). L'État. Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 64 (2):345-357.score: 300.0
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  4. Judith Butler, David Campbell, Rey Chow, Fred Dallmayr, Enrique Dussell, Kim Dae Jung, Hwa Yol Jung, Lydia H. Liu, Kishore Mahbubani, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Thich Nhat Hanh, Nishida Kitaro, Bhikhu Parekh, Edward W. Said, Calvin O. Schrag, Watsuji Tetsuro, Tu Weiming & Zhang Longxi (2002). Comparative Political Culture in the Age of Globalization: An Introductory Anthology. Lexington Books.score: 300.0
     
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  5. Watsuji Tetsurô, Bernard Stevens & Tadanori Takada (2003). La Signification de l'Éthique En Tant Qu'étude de l'Être Humain. Philosophie 79 (3):5.score: 300.0
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  6. Tetsurō Watsuji (1961/1988). Climate and Culture: A Philosophical Study. Greenwood Press.score: 240.0
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  7. Bruce B. Janz (2011). Watsuji Tetsuro, Fudo, and Climate Change. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (2):173 - 184.score: 96.0
    In this paper, I wish to consider Watsuji Tetsuro's (1889?1960) concept of climate (fudo), and consider whether it contributes anything to the relationship between climate change and ethics. I will argue that superficially it seems that fudo tells us little about the ethics of climate change, but if considered more carefully, and through the lens of thinkers such as Deleuze and Heidegger, there is ethical insight in Watsuji's approach. Watsuji's major work in ethics, Rinrigaku, provides concepts such (...)
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  8. Bernard Bernier (2006). National Communion: Watsuji Tetsuro's Conception of Ethics, Power, and the Japanese Imperial State. Philosophy East and West 56 (1):84-105.score: 96.0
    : Watsuji Tetsurō defined ethics as being generated by a double negation: the individual's negation of the community and the self-negation of the individual who returns to the community. Thus, ethics for him is based on the individual's sacrifice for the collectivity. This position results in the conception of the community as an absolute. I contend that there is a congruence between Watsuji's conception of ethics as self-sacrifice and the way he perceived the Japanese political system. To (...)
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  9. James M. Shields (2011). The Art of Aidagara : Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Quest for an Ontology of Social Existence in Watsuji Tetsurō's Rinrigaku. Asian Philosophy 19 (3):265-283.score: 96.0
    This paper provides an analysis of the key term aidagara ('betweenness') in the philosophical ethics of Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960), in response to and in light of the recent movement in Japanese Buddhist studies known as 'Critical Buddhism'. The Critical Buddhist call for a turn away from 'topical' or intuitionist thinking and towards (properly Buddhist) 'critical' thinking, while problematic in its bipolarity, raises the important issue of the place of 'reason' vs 'intuition' in Japanese Buddhist ethics. In this paper, (...)
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  10. William R. LaFleur (2001). Reasons for the Rubble: Watsuji Tetsuro's Position in Japan's Postwar Debate About Rationality. Philosophy East and West 51 (1):1-25.score: 96.0
    A reassessment of Watsuji Tetsurō is undertaken by bringing his changing view of the importance of Francis Bacon to bear on his understanding of the role of "rationality" in Japanese life. This reflection will enable an exploration of the relevance of the modernity / postmodernity distinction for modern Japanese philosophy.
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  11. Graham Mayeda (2006). Time, Space, and Ethics in the Thought of Martin Heidegger, Watsuji Tetsuro, and Kuki Shuzo. Routledge.score: 96.0
    In this book, Graham Mayeda demonstrates how Watsuji Tetsuro and Kuki Shuzo, two twentieth-century Japanese philosophers, criticize and interpret Heideggerian philosophy, articulating traditional Japanese ethics in a modern idiom.
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  12. Isamu Nagami (1981). The Ontological Foundation in Tetsurō Watsuji's Philosophy: Kū and Human Existence. Philosophy East and West 31 (3):279-296.score: 90.0
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  13. Tae-Chang Kim (1999). Conclusion: Bricolaging a Public Philosophy for the Well-Being of Future Generations-First Steps From Tetsuro Watsuji. In Tʻae-chʻang Kim & James Allen Dator (eds.), Co-Creating a Public Philosophy for Future Generations. Praeger. 258.score: 90.0
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  14. Steve Odin (1992). The Social Self in Japanese Philosophy and American Pragmatism: A Comparative Study of Watsuji Tetsurō and George Herbert Mead. Philosophy East and West 42 (3):475-501.score: 72.0
  15. David Dilworth (1974). Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960): Cultural Phenomenologist and Ethician. Philosophy East and West 24 (1):3-22.score: 72.0
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  16. William R. Lafleur (1978). Buddhist Emptiness in the Ethics and Aesthetics of Watsuji Tetsurō. Religious Studies 14 (2):237 - 250.score: 72.0
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  17. Graham Mayeda (2000). Reflections on Time, Space and Ethics in the Philosophy of Nishida Kitaro and Watsuji Tetsuro. International Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):147-155.score: 72.0
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  18. Anton Luis Sevilla (2014). Concretizing an Ethics of Emptiness: The Succeeding Volumes of Watsuji Tetsurô's Ethics. Asian Philosophy 24 (1):82-101.score: 72.0
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  19. Sumihiko Kumano (2009). Watsuji Tetsurō: Bunjin Tetsugakusha No Kiseki. Iwanami Shoten.score: 72.0
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  20. Sumiko Sekiguchi (2007). Kokumin Dōtoku to Jendā: Fukuzawa Yukichi, Inoue Tetsujirō, Watsuji Tetsurō. Tōkyō Daigaku Shuppankai.score: 72.0
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  21. Alistair Swale (1996). The Ethics of Watsuji Tetsuro. In Brian Carr (ed.), Morals and Society in Asian Philosophy. Curzon. 1--37.score: 72.0
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  22. Steven J. Willett (1997). Watsuji Tetsuro,'Rinrigaku': Ethics in Japan Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (3):217-220.score: 72.0
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  23. Joel Krueger (2013). Watsuji's Phenomenology of Embodiment and Social Space. Philosophy East and West 63 (2):127-152.score: 48.0
    The aim of this essay is to situate the thought of Tetsuro Watsuji within contemporary approaches to social cognition. I argue for Watsuji's current relevance, suggesting that his analysis of embodiment and social space puts him in step with some of the concerns driving ongoing treatments of social cognition in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Yet, as I will show, Watsuji can potentially offer a fruitful contribution to this discussion by lending a phenomenologically informed critical perspective. (...)
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  24. Shimizu Tetsuro, Ethical Principles in Palliative Medicine.score: 30.0
    In the present paper I try to show that ethical principles of medical activities in general can be adequately applied to medical activities for the patient in his terminal stage. For this objective, I shall argue first what are the principles and rules of medical activities in general, and then show how these can be applied to palliative medicine.
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  25. Yoko Arisaka (2014). Modern Japanese Philosophy: Historical Contexts and Cultural Implications. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:3-25.score: 30.0
    The paper provides an overview of the rise of Japanese philosophy during the period of rapid modernization in Japan after the Meiji Restoration (beginning in the 1860s). It also examines the controversy surrounding Japanese philosophy towards the end of the Pacific War (1945), and its renewal in the contemporary context. The post-Meiji thinkers engaged themselves with the questions of universality and particularity; the former represented science, medicine, technology, and philosophy (understood as ) and the latter, the Japanese non-Western tradition. Within (...)
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  26. Leah Kalmanson (2010). Levinas in Japan: The Ethics of Alterity and the Philosophy of No-Self. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):193-206.score: 24.0
    Does the Buddhist doctrine of no-self imply, simply put, no-other? Does this doctrine necessarily come into conflict with an ethics premised on the alterity of the other? This article explores these questions by situating Emmanuel Levinas’s ethics in the context of contemporary Japanese philosophy. The work of twentieth-century Japanese philosopher Watsuji Tetsurō provides a starting point from which to consider the ethics of the self-other relation in light of the Buddhist notion of emptiness. The philosophy of thirteenth-century Zen (...)
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  27. Daryl Koehn (1999). What Can Eastern Philosophy Teach Us About Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 19 (1):71 - 79.score: 24.0
    This paper examines what, if anything, "Eastern philosophy" can teach us about business ethics. The whole idea of "Eastern ethics" or so-called "Asian values" is suspect on a number of scores. The paper argues that It is better to refer to specific ideas of particular thinkers influential within one country or tradition. The paper concentrates on the philosophy of two such thinkers – Watsuji Tetsuro of Japan and Confucius. When this more "micro" approach is adopted, we can learn some (...)
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  28. Steve Odin (1991). The Japanese Concept of Nature in Relation to the Environmental Ethics and Conservation Aesthetics of Aldo Leopold. Environmental Ethics 13 (4):345-360.score: 24.0
    I focus on the religio-aesthetic concept of nature in Japanese Buddhism as a valuable complement to environmental philosophy in the West and develop an explicit comparison of the Japanese Buddhist concept of nature and the ecological world view of Aldo Leopold. I discuss the profound current of ecological thought running through the Kegon, Tendai, Shingon, Zen, Pure Land, and Nichiren Buddhist traditions as weIl as modem Japanese philosophy as represented by Nishida Kitarö and Watsuji Tetsurö. In this context, I (...)
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  29. Rein Raud (2002). Objects and Events: Linguistic and Philosophical Notions of 'Thingness'. Asian Philosophy 12 (2):97 – 108.score: 24.0
    The article deals with the differences of the notion of 'object' or 'thing' in natural languages, concluding that some languages are by their structure more object-biased while others are more event-biased and proceeds to analyse how two common Japanese words, mono and koto , both meaning 'thing', have been treated in 20th-century Japanese thought, notably in the philosophical works of Watsuji Tetsurô, Ide Takashi, Hiromatsu Wataru and Kimura Bin. All of these thinkers represent different schools and trends (Watsuji (...)
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  30. David A. Dilworth, V. H. Viglielmo & Agustín Jacinto Zavala (eds.) (1998). Sourcebook for Modern Japanese Philosophy: Selected Documents. Greenwood Press.score: 24.0
    Nishida Kitarô -- Tanabe Hajime -- Kuki Shûzô -- Watsuji Tetsurô -- Miki Kiyoshi -- Tosaka Jun -- Nishitani Keiji.
     
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  31. Fumihiro Takahashi (2012). Kindai Nihon No Rinri Shisō: Shujū Dōtoku to Kokka. Shibunkaku Shuppan.score: 24.0
    Dai 1-bu. Kindai no tachiage : chishikijintachi -- dai 2-bu. Kindai no katarinaoshi : Watsuji Tetsurō -- dai 3-bu. Nishimura Shigeki bunken kaidai.
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  32. Augustin Berque (1994). Milieu et logique du lieu chez Watsuji. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 92 (4):495-507.score: 9.0
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  33. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2007). From Community to Time-Space Development: Comparing N. S. Trubetzkoy, Nishida Kitar, and Watsuji Tetsur. Asian Philosophy 17 (3):263 – 282.score: 9.0
    I introduce and compare Russian and Japanese notions of community and space. Some characteristic strains of thought that exist in both countries had similar points of departure, overcame similar problems and arrived at similar results. In general, in Japan and Russia, the nostalgia for the community has been strong because one felt that in society through modernization something of the particularity of one's culture had been lost. As a consequence, both in Japan and in Russia allusions to the German sociologist (...)
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  34. Juan Masiá Clavel (1999). La noción de antropología sociológica en japonés según T. Watsuji. Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 23:199-208.score: 9.0
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  35. Jm-J. Haidan (1999). La noción de antropología filosófica en Japonés, Según T. Watsuji. Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 23:199-207.score: 9.0
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  36. Mariana Ortega (2004). Exiled Space, in‐Between Space: Existential Spatiality in Ana Mendieta'sSiluetasSeries. Philosophy and Geography 7 (1):25-41.score: 3.0
    Existential space is lived space, space permeated by our raced, gendered selves. It is representative of our very existence. The purpose of this essay is to explore the intersection between this lived space and art by analyzing the work of the Cuban?born artist Ana Mendieta and showing how her Siluetas Series discloses a space of exile. The first section discusses existential spatiality as explained by the phenomenologists Heidegger and Watsuji and as represented in Mendieta's Siluetas. The second section analyzes (...)
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  37. A. Berque (2005). A Basis for Environmental Ethics. Diogenes 52 (3):3-12.score: 3.0
    The overuse of water resources in the upper reaches of the Tarim (Xinjiang, China) jeopardizes the ecosystem of the huyang (Populus diversifolia) in the middle reaches of the river, which has led the authorities to displace the population of Caohu (Luntai-xian) in the name of environmental security. This paper discusses the ethical basis of such operations by comparing different approaches, and concludes that establishing a genuine environmental ethics implies an ontological revolution: one that will replace the ‘being towards death’ (Sein (...)
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  38. Lucy Schultz (2013). Creative Climate. Environmental Philosophy 10 (1):63-81.score: 3.0
    In different ways, Watsuji, Nishida, and Merleau-Ponty describe a self that extends beyond the skin through a sort of dialectic of internal/external space of perception and action, which has implications for understanding the relationship between art and nature in artistic creation. Through an exposition of Watsuji’s conception of human being in relation to a climatic milieu, Nishida’s theory of the expressive body as the site of the world’s own self-transformations, and certain claims made by Merleau-Ponty in his essays (...)
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  39. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2009). Aesthetics and Politics of Space in Russia and Japan: A Comparative Philosophical Study. Lexington Books.score: 3.0
    Introduction -- The historical foundations of Russian and Japanese philosophies -- Space in NOH : plays and icons -- Models of cultural space derived from Nishida Kitar and Semën L. Frank (Basho and Sobornost) -- Space and aesthetics : a dialogue between Nishida Kitar and Mikhail Bakhtin -- From community to time, space, development : Trubetzkoy, Nishida, Watsuji -- Conclusion -- Postface: Resistance and slave nations.
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  40. Nobuyuki Kawai & Tetsuro Matsuzawa (2001). “Magical Number 5” in a Chimpanzee. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):127-128.score: 3.0
    One of our recent studies has revealed that a numerically trained chimpanzee can memorize a correct sequence of five numbers shown on a monitor. Comparative investigations with humans show very similar patterns of errors in the two species, suggesting humans and chimpanzee share homologous memory processes. Whether or not 5 is a pure capacity limit for the chimpanzee remains an empirical question.
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  41. Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masaki Tomonaga, Masayuki Tanaka & Tetsuro Matsuzawa (2003). Preference for Human Direct Gaze in Infant Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes). Cognition 89 (2):113-124.score: 3.0
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  42. Kaichiro Furutani, Tetsuro Kobayashi & Mitsuhiro Ura (2009). Effects of Internet Use on Self-Efficacy: Perceived Network-Changing Possibility as a Mediator. [REVIEW] AI and Society 23 (2):251-263.score: 3.0
    The effect of Internet use as a mediating variable on self-efficacy as it relates to the cognition of network-changing possibility (i.e., connecting people or groups with different social backgrounds) was examined. The results showed that Internet use (i.e., the frequency of sending e-mail, friends made on the Internet) had a positive effect on the cognition of network-changing possibility. The cognition that it is possible to connect people with different social backgrounds by using the Internet also had a positive effect on (...)
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  43. Nobuyuki Kawai & Tetsuro Matsuzawa (2000). A Conventional Approach to Chimpanzee Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):128-129.score: 3.0
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  44. Tetsuro Matsuzawa & Gen Yamakoshi (1996). Comparison of Chimpanzee Material Culture Between Bossou and Nimba, West Africa. In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press. 211--232.score: 3.0
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  45. Tetsuro Matsuzawa (1991). Nesting Cups and Metatools in Chimpanzees. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):570-571.score: 3.0
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  46. Tetsuro Matsuzawa (2002). Chimpanzee Ai and Her Son Ayumu: An Episode of Education by Master-Apprenticeship. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. Mit Press. 189--195.score: 3.0
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  47. Tetsuro Matsuzawa (2010). Cognitive Development in Chimpanzees: A Trade-Off Between Memory and Abstraction. In Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.), The Making of Human Concepts. Oup Oxford. 227--244.score: 3.0
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  48. Tetsuro Matsuzawa (2009). Social Animal Cognition. Interaction Studies 10 (2):107-113.score: 3.0
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  49. Tetsurō Saiki (2004). Shin Kan Jukyō No Kenkyū. Kyūko Shoin.score: 3.0
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  50. Tetsuro Shimuzuo Shimizu (1990). Time and Eternity: Ockham's Logical Point of View. Franciscan Studies 50 (1):283-307.score: 3.0
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