Search results for 'The Bioethics Editorial Team' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. The Bioethics Editorial Team (2003). Tribute to Dorothy Wertz. Bioethics 17 (4):v–v.score: 2130.0
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  2. Globalizing Western Bioethics (2011). Some Perils and Pitfalls of “Missionary Bioethics” and Ethics “Capacity Building” in the Developing World and “Eastern” World. In Catherine Myser (ed.), Bioethics Around the Globe. Oxford University Press.score: 1500.0
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  3. Nikola Biller-Andorno (forthcoming). Editorial: The Bioethics Biz. Journal of Medical Ethics.score: 427.5
     
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  4. Wim Dekkers & Bert Gordijn (2005). The Attentive Reader of Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy Will Have Noticed That the Cover of the Journal is Different From Earlier Issues. From the Eighth Volume on the Editorial Team of Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy has Changed. The Reason. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8:1.score: 427.5
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  5. Renée C. Fox & Judith P. Swazey (2010). Guest Editorial: Ignoring the Social and Cultural Context of Bioethics Is Unacceptable. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (03):278-281.score: 405.0
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  6. Pablo Rodríguez Del Pozo & Joseph J. Fins (2009). Guest Editorial: The Many Voices of Spanish Bioethics—An Introduction. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (03):214-.score: 405.0
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  7. Rick Edmonds (2010). At the December 2001 Media Week Conference for Investors, Sponsored by Credit Suisse and Staged in the Grand Ballroom of the Plaza Hotel, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. Led the New York Times Presentation Team. Business Was Only Fair After Eight Months of Recession, but Chairman Sulzberger Bantered Ligh-Tly with Then CEO Russ Lewis. Putting on His Publisher's Hat, an Exuberant Sulzberger Turned to Editorial Matters. He Bobbed on the Balls of His Feet at the Podium as He Talked About His Flagship Paper's Coverage ... [REVIEW] In Christopher Meyers (ed.), Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. 185.score: 405.0
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  8. John A. Behnke (1971). Editorial: The New Team. BioScience 21 (8):353-353.score: 405.0
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  9. Akira Akabayashi (ed.) (2014). The Future of Bioethics: International Dialogues. Oup Oxford.score: 279.0
    This is the first book to bring West and East together in a broad investigation of contemporary bioethics. A distinguished international team of experts presents original research addressing issues that emerge from new medical technologies, address global challenges arising from social change, and set the agenda for the future.
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  10. Kenneth V. Iserson (2000). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (4):580-582.score: 238.5
    This section is meant to be a mutual effort. If you find an article you think should be abstracted in this section, do not be bashful—submit it for consideration to feature editor Kenneth V. Iserson care of CQ. If you do not like the editorial comments, this will give you an opportunity to respond in the letters section. Your input is desired and anticipated.
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  11. Kenneth V. Iserson (2001). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Literature. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):456-458.score: 238.5
    This section is meant to be a mutual effort. If you find an article you think should be abstracted in this section, do not be bashful—submit it for consideration to feature editor Kenneth V. Iserson care of CQ. If you do not like the editorial comments, this will give you an opportunity to respond in the letters section. Your input is desired and anticipated.
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  12. Kenneth V. Iserson (1998). Abstracts of Note: The Bioethics Lecture. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (1):112-114.score: 238.5
    This section is meant to be a mutual effort. If you find an article you think should be abstracted in this section, do not be bashful—submit it for consideration to Kenneth V. Iserson care of CQ. If you do not like the editorial comments, this will give you an opportunity to respond in the letters section. Your input is desired and anticipated.
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  13. Stefano Semplici (2011). Editorial for the Thematic Section “Social Responsibility and Health”. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):353-354.score: 216.0
    The contributions collected in this section deal with some of the most crucial issues addressed in the Report on “Social Responsibility and Health” of the International Bioethics Committee: the importance of ‘social responsibility’ in the promotion of health, i.e. far beyond the context of the ethics of management and private companies where the term was introduced at first; the role of solidarity as a necessary presupposition for a genuinely universalistic morality of justice; the content of the right to health (...)
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  14. James W. McAllister (2001). New Editorial Team and Policy Statement. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (3):229 – 230.score: 211.5
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  15. H. T. Engelhardt (forthcoming). Free and Informed Consent, Refusal of Treatment and the Health Care Team. Foundations of Bioethics Vol 1.score: 211.5
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  16. Mi-Kyung Kim (2009). Oversight Framework Over Oocyte Procurement for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Comparative Analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk Case Under South Korean Bioethics Law and U.S. Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (5):367-384.score: 207.0
    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang’s potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under governmental auspices (...)
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  17. Udo Schuklenk (2010). Defending the Indefensible. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (1):83-88.score: 201.0
    This response addresses criticisms in this journal of an Editorial written by Willem Landman and Udo Schuklenk. I demonstrate that the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights is in crucial aspects deficient, despite attempts in this journal to defend the Declaration against its critics. I focus on individual versus societal interests, research ethics, informed consent and the use of “human dignity” to illustrate the weaknesses of the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. This article concludes (...)
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  18. Subrata Chattopadhyay, Catherine Myser & Raymond De Vries (2013). Bioethics and Its Gatekeepers: Does Institutional Racism Exist in Leading Bioethics Journals? [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):7-9.score: 201.0
    Who are the gatekeepers in bioethics? Does editorial bias or institutional racism exist in leading bioethics journals? We analyzed the composition of the editorial boards of 14 leading bioethics journals by country. Categorizing these countries according to their Human Development Index (HDI), we discovered that approximately 95 percent of editorial board members are based in (very) high-HDI countries, less than 4 percent are from medium-HDI countries, and fewer than 1.5 percent are from low-HDI countries. (...)
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  19. Christopher Jordens (2007). What Makes a Journal an International Journal? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):1-2.score: 196.0
    The JBI (Journal of Bioethical Inquiry) is currently re-organising the editorial positions so as to distribute responsibility over a larger team of specialist associate editors. This is necessary due to the increasing workload that comes with a rapidly growing journal, and also due to changes in bioethics itself. Bioethics is becoming more diverse in terms of the disciplines and perspectives it engages. Combined with the international distribution that is enabled by our new publisher, this will help (...)
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  20. Nicola Osborne, Daisy Payne & Michael Newman (2009). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Journal Editorial Policies, Animal Welfare, and the 3Rs”. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):3-3.score: 189.0
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  21. Glenn McGee (forthcoming). Editorial: The Wisdom of Leon the Professional [Ethicist]. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):vii-viii.score: 189.0
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  22. Nicola Osborne, Daisy Payne & Michael Newman (2009). Journal Editorial Policies, Animal Welfare, and the 3Rs. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):55-59.score: 189.0
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  23. David C. Thomasma (1985). Editorial Philosophy of Medicine in the U.S.A. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).score: 189.0
  24. Thomas Faunce (2012). Governing Planetary Nanomedicine: Environmental Sustainability and a UNESCO Universal Declaration on the Bioethics and Human Rights of Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis (Global Solar Fuels and Foods). [REVIEW] NanoEthics 6 (1):15-27.score: 174.0
    Abstract Environmental and public health-focused sciences are increasingly characterised as constituting an emerging discipline—planetary medicine. From a governance perspective, the ethical components of that discipline may usefully be viewed as bestowing upon our ailing natural environment the symbolic moral status of a patient. Such components emphasise, for example, the origins and content of professional and social virtues and related ethical principles needed to promote global governance systems and policies that reduce ecological stresses and pathologies derived from human overpopulation, selfishness and (...)
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  25. Arran Gare & Paul Ashton (2005). Editorial Introduction to the First Edition of Cosmos and History. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (1):1-2.score: 174.0
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  26. Mário Antonio Sanches & Vanessa Roberta Massambani Ruthes (2009). Ética mundial e cultura da paz: desafios da Bioética (World-wide ethics and culture of the peace: dialleenges of the Bioethics) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2009v7n14p31. [REVIEW] Horizonte 7 (14):31-45.score: 171.0
    O projeto de ética mundial, desenvolvido pelo teólogo ecumênico Hans Küng, propõe que somente por meio de um diálogo inter-religioso é possível estruturar princípios básicos que sejam válidos globalmente e que proporcionem a construção de uma cultura da paz. Essa possibilidade no campo da ética estabelece um amplo diálogo com diferentes autores. No entanto, como o próprio autor assume, o projeto possui limitações, sendo que uma delas é a exclusão de temas que envolvem questões de Bioética que são importantes para (...)
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  27. Ruth F. Chadwick (ed.) (2007). The Bioethics Reader: Editors' Choice. Blackwell Pub..score: 171.0
    A collection celebrating some of the best essays from the Blackwell journals, Bioethics and Developing World Bioethics. Contributors include Helga Kuhse, Michael Selgelid and Baroness Mary Warnock, former Chair of the British Government’s Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilization and Embryology’s. Traces some of the most important concerns of the 1980s, such as the ethics of euthanasia, reproductive technologies, the allocation of scarce medical resources, surrogate motherhood, through to a range of new issues debated today, particularly in the (...)
     
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  28. David J. Doukas (1992). The Design and Use of the Bioethics Consultation Form. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1).score: 168.0
    The emergence of the ethics consultation as a means to resolve moral crises in clinical medicine has revealed the need for a worksheet that would facilitate intake and analysis. The author developed the Bioethics Consultation Form as an attempt to remedy this need. The form is arranged in an outline format and is a useful asset to ethics committee discussions and record keeping. The first section covers basic intake data concerning the patient's medical and personal information, advance directives, and (...)
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  29. Sarah K. Brem & Karen Z. Anijar (2003). The Bioethics of Fiction: The Chimera in Film and Print. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):22 – 24.score: 168.0
    (2003). The Bioethics of Fiction: The Chimera in Film and Print. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 22-24. doi: 10.1162/15265160360706787.
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  30. C. T. Partridge & J. Turiaso (2005). Widows, Women, and the Bioethics of Care. Christian Bioethics 11 (1):77-92.score: 168.0
    Widows, women, and the bioethics of care must be understood within an authentic Christian ontology of gender. Men are men and women are women, and their being is ontologically marked in difference. There is an ontology of gender with important implications for the role of women in the family and the Church. The Christian Church has traditionally recognized a role for widows, deaconesses, and female monastics, which is not that of the liturgical priesthood, but one with a special relationship (...)
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  31. Norman Swazo (2013). “The Animal” After Derrida: Interrogating the Bioethics of Geno-Cide. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 8 (1):91-123.score: 165.0
    Bioethics tends to be dominated by discourses concerned with the ethical dimension of medical practice, the organization of medical care, and the integrity of biomedical research involving human subjects and animal testing. Jacques Derrida has explored the fundamental question of the “limit” that identifies and differentiates the human animal from the nonhuman animal. However, to date his work has not received any reception in the field of biomedical ethics. In this paper, I examine what Derrida’s thought about this limit (...)
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  32. Charles Dupras, Vardit Ravitsky & Bryn Williams‐Jones (2014). Epigenetics and the Environment in Bioethics. Bioethics 28 (7):327-334.score: 165.0
    A rich literature in public health has demonstrated that health is strongly influenced by a host of environmental factors that can vary according to social, economic, geographic, cultural or physical contexts. Bioethicists should, we argue, recognize this and – where appropriate – work to integrate environmental concerns into their field of study and their ethical deliberations. In this article, we present an argument grounded in scientific research at the molecular level that will be familiar to – and so hopefully more (...)
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  33. Rebecca L. Walker & Clair Morrissey (2013). Bioethics Methods in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of the Human Genome Project Literature. Bioethics 28 (8).score: 165.0
    While bioethics as a field has concerned itself with methodological issues since the early years, there has been no systematic examination of how ethics is incorporated into research on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Yet ELSI research may bear a particular burden of investigating and substantiating its methods given public funding, an explicitly cross-disciplinary approach, and the perceived significance of adequate responsiveness to advances in genomics. We undertook a qualitative content analysis of (...)
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  34. Deborah Cummins (2002). The Professional Status of Bioethics Consultation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):19-43.score: 165.0
    Is bioethics consultation a profession? Withfew exceptions, the arguments andcounterarguments about whether healthcareethics consultation is a profession haveignored the historical and cultural developmentof professions in the United States, the wayssocial changes have altered the work andboundaries of all professions, and theprofessionalization theories that explain howmodern societies institutionalize expertise inprofessions. This interdisciplinary analysisbegins to fill this gap by framing the debatewithin a larger theoretical context heretoforemissing from the bioethics literature. Specifically, the question of whether ethicsconsultation is a profession is (...)
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  35. H. T. Engelhardt (2005). The Bioethics of Care: Widows, Monastics, and a Christian Presence in Health Care. Christian Bioethics 11 (1):1-10.score: 165.0
    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, with vocations to the Christian religious orders of the West in marked decline, an authentic Christian presence in health care is threatened. There are no longer large numbers of women willing to offer their life labors bound in vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, so as to provide a real preferential option for the poor through supporting an authentic Christian mission in health care. At the same time, the frequent earlier death of men (...)
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  36. Margrit Shildrick (2004). Reconfiguring the Bioethics of Reproduction. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):77-85.score: 165.0
    The paper contends that, despite critiquing certain aspects of modernist thought feminist bioethics has become stuck in its own inadequate paradigms that pay insufficient attention to either the theoretical insights of postmodernism, or to the capacities of biotechnology in the postmodern era to disrupt prior certainties. In the face of an incalculable expansion of both theoretical and material possibilities, feminist bioethicists working in the field of reproduction have remained largely unwilling to reconfigure notions such as embodiment, subjectivity, agency, and (...)
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  37. Riin Magnus (forthcoming). The Function, Formation and Development of Signs in the Guide Dog Team's Work. Biosemiotics:1-17.score: 163.0
    Relying on interviews and fieldwork observations, the article investigates the choice of signs made by guide dogs and their visually impaired handlers while the team is on the move. It also explores the dependence of the choice of signs on specific functions of communication and examines the changes and development of sign usage throughout the team’s work. A significant part of the team’s communication appears to be related to retaining the communicative situation itself: to the establishment of (...)
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  38. Lehel Balogh (2010). The Public Debate on the Religiosity of the Public Debate of Bioethics in the USA. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (23):3-12.score: 163.0
    Despite the fact that bioethics is, basically, an interdisciplinary scientific field, it is deeply intertwined with less objectivistic, yet important, threads of morality and religion. From the beginning, in the United States, the language of bioethics has been shaped by theologians and people who do not neglect the religious approaches of particular scientific issues. This paper examines the possibility of using religious and nonreligious terminologies in the bioethical discourse, paying close attention to the American bioethical debate. I shall (...)
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  39. David Shoemaker (2010). Personal Identity and Bioethics: The State of the Art. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (4):249-257.score: 162.0
    In this introduction to the special issue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics on the topic of personal identity and bioethics, I provide a background for the topic and then discuss the contributions in the special issue by Eric Olson, Marya Schechtman, Tim Campbell and Jeff McMahan, James Delaney and David Hershenov, and David DeGrazia.
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  40. Ruth Macklin (2010). The Death of Bioethics (as We Once Knew It). Bioethics 24 (5):211-217.score: 162.0
    Fast forward 50 years into the future. A look back at what occurred in the field of bioethics since 2010 reveals that a conference in 2050 commemorated the death of bioethics. In a steady progression over the years, the field became increasingly fragmented and bureaucratized. Disagreement and dissension were rife, and this once flourishing, multidisciplinary field began to splinter in multiple ways. Prominent journals folded, one by one, and were replaced with specialized publications dealing with genethics, reproethics, nanoethics, (...)
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  41. Albert Garth Thomas (2012). Continuing the Definition of Death Debate: The Report of the President's Council on Bioethics on Controversies in the Determination of Death. Bioethics 26 (2):101-107.score: 162.0
    The President's Council on Bioethics has recently released a report supportive of the continued use of brain death as a criterion for human death. The Council's conclusions were based on a conception of life that stressed external work as the fundamental marker of organismic life. With respect to human life, it is spontaneous respiration in particular that indicates an ability to interact with the external environment, and so indicates the presence of life. Conversely, irreversible apnoea marks an inability to (...)
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  42. Angus Dawson (2010). The Future of Bioethics: Three Dogmas and a Cup of Hemlock. Bioethics 24 (5):218-225.score: 162.0
    In this paper I argue that bioethics is in crisis and that it will not have a future unless it begins to embrace a more Socratic approach to its leading assumptions. The absence of a critical and sceptical spirit has resulted in little more than a dominant ideology. I focus on three key issues. First, that too often bioethics collapses into medical ethics. Second, that medical ethics itself is beset by a lack of self-reflection that I characterize here (...)
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  43. Thomas K. McElhinney & Edmund D. Pellegrino (2001). The Institute on Human Values in Medicine: Its Role and Influence in the Conception and Evolution of Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):291-317.score: 162.0
    For ten years, 1971–1981, the Institute onHuman Values in Medicine (IHVM) played a keyrole in the development of Bioethics as afield. We have written this history andanalysis to bring to new generations ofBioethicists information about the developmentof their field within both the humanitiesdisciplines and the health professions. Thepioneers in medical humanities and ethics cametogether with medical professionals in thedecade of the 1960s. By the 1980s Bioethics wasa fully recognized discipline. We show the rolethat IHVM programs played in defining (...)
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  44. Nathan Emmerich (2011). Literature, History and the Humanization of Bioethics. Bioethics 25 (2):112-118.score: 162.0
    This paper considers the disciplines of literature and history and the contributions each makes to the discourse of bioethics. In each case I note the pedagogic ends that can be enacted though the appropriate use of the each of these disciplines in the sphere of medical education, particularly in the medical ethics classroom.1 I then explore the contribution that both these disciplines and their respective methodologies can and do bring to the academic field of bioethics. I conclude with (...)
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  45. Miran Epstein (2010). How Will the Economic Downturn Affect Academic Bioethics? Bioethics 24 (5):226-233.score: 162.0
    An educated guess about the future of academic bioethics can only be made on the basis of the historical conditions of its success. According to its official history, which attributes its success primarily to the service it has done for the patient, it should be safe at least as long as the patient still needs its service. Like many other academic disciplines, it might suffer under the present economic downturn. However, in the plausible assumption that its social role has (...)
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  46. Rosamond Rhodes (2001). Understanding the Trusted Doctor and Constructing a Theory of Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (6):493-504.score: 162.0
    This paper offers a constructivist account of bioethics as an alternative to previous discussions that explained the ethics of medicine by an extrapolation of principles or virtues from ordinary morality. Taking medicine as a higher and special calling, I argue that the practice of medicine would be impossible without the trust of patients. Because trust is a necessary condition for medical practice, the ethics of the profession must provide the principles for guiding physician behavior and the profession toward promoting (...)
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  47. Lisa Cassidy (2013). Thoughts on the Bioethics of Estranged Biological Kin. Hypatia 28 (1):32-48.score: 162.0
    This paper considers the bioethics of estranged biological kin, who are biologically related people not in contact with one another (due to adoption, abandonment, or other long-term estrangement). Specifically, I am interested in what is owed to estranged biological kin in the event of medical need. A survey of current bioethics demonstrates that most analyses are not prepared to reckon with the complications of having or being estranged biological kin. For example, adoptees might wonder if a lack of (...)
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  48. Heidi Mertes & Guido Pennings (2011). The Force of Dissimilar Analogies in Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (2):117-128.score: 162.0
    Although analogical reasoning has long been a popular method of reasoning in bioethics, current literature does not sufficiently grasp its variety. We assert that the main shortcoming is the fact that an analogy's value is often judged on the extent of similarity between the source situation and the target situation, while in (bio)ethics, analogies are often used because of certain dissimilarities rather than in spite of them. We make a clear distinction between dissimilarities that aim to reinforce a similar (...)
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  49. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2012). Medical Ethics in an Era of Bioethics: Resetting the Medical Profession's Compass. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):21-24.score: 162.0
    What it means to be a medical professional has been defined by medical ethicists throughout history and remains a contemporary concern addressed by this paper. A medical professional is generally considered to be one who makes a public promise to fulfill the ethical obligations expressed in the Hippocratic Code. This presentation summarizes the history of medical professionalism and refocuses attention on the interpersonal relationship of doctor and patient. This keynote address was delivered at the Founders of Bioethics International Congress (...)
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