Search results for 'The EUROGENBANK Consortium' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rosa Lynn Pinkus, Gretchen M. Aumann, Mark G. Kuczewski, Anne Medsger, Alan Meisel, Lisa S. Parker & Mark R. Wicclair (1995). The Consortium Ethics Program: An Approach to Establishing a Permanent Regional Ethics Network. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 7 (1):13-32.score: 48.0
    This paper describes the first three-year experience of the Consortium Ethics Program (CEP-1) of the University of Pittsburgh Center for Medical Ethics, and also outlines plans for the second three-year phase (CEP-2) of this experiment in continuing ethics education. In existence since 1990, the CEP has the primary goal of creating a cost-effective, permanent ethics resource network, by utilizing the educational resources of a university bioethics center and the practical expertise of a regional hospital council. The CEP's conception and (...)
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  2. Isabelle Hirtzlin, Christine Dubreuil, Nathalie Préaubert, Jenny Duchier, Brigitte Jansen, Jürgen Simon, Paula Lobatao De Faria, Anna Perez-Lezaun, Bert Visser, Garrath Williams, Anne Cambon-Thomsen & The Eurogenbank Consortium (2003). An Empirical Survey on Biobanking of Human Genetic Material and Data in Six EU Countries. European Journal of Human Genetics 11:475–488.score: 43.0
    Biobanks correspond to different situations: research and technological development, medical diagnosis or therapeutic activities. Their status is not clearly defined. We aimed to investigate human biobanking in Europe, particularly in relation to organisational, economic and ethical issues in various national contexts. Data from a survey in six EU countries (France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the UK) were collected as part of a European Research Project examining human and non-human biobanking (EUROGENBANK, coordinated by Professor JC Galloux). A total (...)
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  3. D. W. Brock, D. Callahan, D. S. Diekema, R. Dworkin, T. Nagel, R. Nozick, J. Rawls, T. Scanlon, J. J. Thomson & J. J. Fins (2005). A Favorites Reading List From the Cambridge Consortium for Bioethics Education. Ethics 14 (2):141-6.score: 42.0
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  4. Ton Meijers (2013). Religious Freedom in the European Union: The Application of the European Convention on Human Rights in the European Union, Proceedings of the 19th Meeting of the European Consortium for Church and State Research Nicosia (Cyprus), 15 –18 November 2007, Leuven, Paris, Edited by Achilles Emilianides. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (2):166-167.score: 42.0
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  5. Thomas E. Novotny, Emilio Mordini, Ruth Chadwick, J. Martin Pedersen, Fabrizio Fabbri, Reidar K. Lie, Natapong Thanachaiboot, Elias Mossialos & Govin Permanand, Bioethical Implications of Globalization: An International Consortium Project of the European Commission.score: 39.0
    The term “globalization” was popularized by Marshall McLuhan in War and Peace in the Global Village. In the book, McLuhan described how the global media shaped current events surrounding the Vietnam War [1] and also predicted how modern information and communication technologies would accelerate world progress through trade and knowledge development. Globalization now refers to a broad range of issues regarding the movement of goods and services through trade liberalization, and the movement of people through migration. Much has also been (...)
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  6. Thomas Magnell (2002). Harvard Ethics Consortium Case: The Burden of Moral Decision in Traumatic Treatment. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (4):533-547.score: 36.0
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  7. Alexander Kon (2008). The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium and the Translational Research Model. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (3):58-60.score: 36.0
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  8. Raymond E. Spier (2006). Reflections on the Budapest Meeting 2005 of the European Ethics Consortium. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):587-590.score: 36.0
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  9. John W. Baldwin (1992). Howell Chickering and Thomas H. Seiler, Eds., The Study of Chivalry: Resources and Approaches. Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, for the Consortium for the Teaching of the Middle Ages, 1988. Pp. X, 700; Black-and-White Figures. $39.95 (Cloth); $19.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 67 (4):944-946.score: 36.0
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  10. Daniel Donoghue (1999). Robert Henryson, The Poems of Robert Henryson, Ed. Robert L. Kindrick with Kristie A. Bixby.(Middle English Texts.) Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, for the Consortium for the Teaching of the Middle Ages, in Association with the University of Rochester, 1997. Paper. Pp. Ix, 313. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (2):431-432.score: 36.0
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  11. François Matarasso, Eric Newman & Richard Abel (2003). Book Reviews of –œReading And Reader Developmentâ–, –œConsortium Purchasing Directoryâ–, and –Œâ–œThe Worldâ–™s Best Booksâ–: Taste, Culture, and The Modern Libraryâ–. Logos 14 (4):222-229.score: 36.0
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  12. Christine Mitchell (2006). Cases From the Harvard Ethics Consortium-" Margaret's" Children Remember. Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (4):349.score: 36.0
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  13. Christine Mitchell & Robert Truog (2002). Cases From the Harvard Ethics Consortium. Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (2):146-146.score: 36.0
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  14. C. Mitchell & R. Truog (2002). Case Reports From the Harvard Ethics Consortium. Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (1):49.score: 36.0
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  15. D. Eirwyn Morgan (1978). Hugh M. Reilly. Christian Initiation. Pp. 481. (The Catholic University of American Consortium Press, 1974.) $21. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 14 (4):545.score: 36.0
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  16. RosaLynn B. Pinkus (1999). The Consortium Ethics Program: Continuing Ethics Education for Community Healthcare Professionals. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 11 (3):233-246.score: 36.0
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  17. Gary W. Shawver (2000). Thomas Usk, The Testament of Love, Ed. R. Allen Shoaf.(Middle English Texts.) Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, for the Consortium for the Teaching of the Middle Ages in Association with the University of Rochester, 1998. Paper. Pp. Xiv, 455; Black-and-White Frontispiece Facsimile and Diagrams. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (1):255-256.score: 36.0
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  18. Anderson Faustino da Silva & Vitor Santos Costa (2006). Doctoral Consortium Presentations-The Design and Implementation of the YAP Compiler: An Optimizing Compiler for Logic Programming Languages. In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer-Verlag. 461-462.score: 36.0
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  19. Jeremy Sugarman, Lisa A. Eckenwiler & Ezekiel J. Emanuel (2002). Research Oversight Through New Lenses: The Consortium to Examine Clinical Research Ethics. Irb 25 (1):9-10.score: 36.0
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  20. R. N. Swanson (2002). Thomas J. Heffernan and E. Ann Matter, Eds., The Liturgy of the Medieval Church. Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, for the Consortium for the Teaching of the Middle Ages, 2001. Pp. Xviii, 778; Black-and-White Figures, Tables, and 1 Map. [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (4):1303-1305.score: 36.0
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  21. G. Tellini (1976). Thomas A. Krosnicki, S.V.D. Ancient Patterns in Modern Prayer. Studies in Christian Antiquity (Ed. Johannes Quasten), Vol. 19. Pp. Viii + 309. (Washing-Ton: The Catholic University of America Press, C/o Consortium Press, 1973.) $20.00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 12 (2):270.score: 36.0
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  22. Luke White & Claire Pajaczkowska (eds.) (2009). The Sublime Now. Cambridge Scholars.score: 29.0
    This edited collection had its origins in a two-day conference held at the Tate Britain, organised collaboratively by research staff and students at Middlesex University and the London Consortium in order to celebrate the 250th Anniversary of the publication of Edmund Burke's famous book on the sublime. The conference was funded by Middlesex University, the London Consortium and the Tate Britain's AHRC-funded "Sublime Object: Nature, Art and Language" research project. The conference set out to critically examine the legacy (...)
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  23. Rachele Malavasi, Kalevi Kull & Almo Farina (2014). The Acoustic Codes: How Animal Sign Processes Create Sound-Topes and Consortia Via Conflict Avoidance. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 7 (1):89-95.score: 27.0
    In this essay we argue for the possibility to describe the co-presence of species in a community as a consortium built by acoustic codes, using mainly the examples of bird choruses. In this particular case, the consortium is maintained via the sound-tope that different bird species create by singing in a chorus. More generally, the formation of acoustic codes as well as cohesive communicative systems (the consortia) can be seen as a result of plastic adaptational behaviour of the (...)
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  24. Holly A. Stadler, John M. Morrissey, Brian Williams-Rice, Joycelyn E. Tucker, Julie A. Paige, Jo E. McWilliams & Denise Kay (1994). HEC Consortium Survey: Current Perspectives of Physicians and Nurses. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 6 (5):269-289.score: 27.0
    At the request of the Midwest Bioethics Center (MBC), we surveyed nurses' and physicians' attitudes and needs regarding Hospital Ethics Committees (HECs). The primary objective of this research project was to inform the practices and policies of the Ethics Committee Consortium of the Bioethics Center.Four thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine surveys were distributed to the medical and nursing staff of eight Kansas City metropolitan area hospitals. One thousand and fifty-five surveys were returned, representing a response rate of 21%.
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  25. Cezary Kościelniak (2012). The Context of the in the a Case Study of the Cross-Border University. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 100 (1):197-215.score: 24.0
    I explore the economic, social and cultural constraints of the regional mission of a university located beyond a metropolitan area or urban agglomeration, henceforth referred to as a “peripheral university.” In the first part of the paper, I briefly describe the “third mission” of a university and analyze it within the context of a “peripheral university”. The main constraints on the influence of regional mission and regional development are described. In the second part, I examine one type of a “peripheral (...)
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  26. Ko#347 & Cezary Cielniak (2012). The Context of the in the a Case Study of the Cross-Border University. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 100 (1):197-215.score: 24.0
    I explore the economic, social and cultural constraints of the regional mission of a university located beyond a metropolitan area or urban agglomeration, henceforth referred to as a “peripheral university.” In the first part of the paper, I briefly describe the “third mission” of a university and analyze it within the context of a “peripheral university”. The main constraints on the influence of regional mission and regional development are described. In the second part, I examine one type of a “peripheral (...)
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  27. Phillip Bricker (2006). David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds. In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing.score: 21.0
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
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  28. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). The Individuation of the Senses. In , Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    How many senses do humans possess? Five external senses, as most cultures have it—sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste? Should proprioception, kinaesthesia, thirst, and pain be included, under the rubric bodily sense? What about the perception of time and the sense of number? Such questions reduce to two. 1. How do we distinguish a sense from other sorts of information-receiving faculties? 2. By what principle do we distinguish the senses? Aristotle discussed these questions in the De Anima. H. P. Grice (...)
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  29. Nicholas Maxwell (2012). Does Science Provide Us with the Methodological Key to Wisdom? Philosophia, First Part of 'Arguing for Wisdom in the University' 40 (4):664-673.score: 21.0
    Science provides us with the methodological key to wisdom. This idea goes back to the 18th century French Enlightenment. Unfortunately, in developing the idea, the philosophes of the Enlightenment made three fundamental blunders: they failed to characterize the progress-achieving methods of science properly, they failed to generalize these methods properly, and they failed to develop social inquiry as social methodology having, as its basic task, to get progress-achieving methods, generalized from science, into social life so that humanity might make progress (...)
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  30. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (forthcoming). Charitable Interpretations and the Political Domestication of Spinoza, or, Benedict in the Land of the Secular Imagination. In Mogens Laerke Eric Schilsser (ed.), The Methodology of the History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    In a beautiful recent essay, the philosopher Walter Sinnott-Armstrong explains the reasons for his departure from evangelical Christianity, the religious culture in which he was brought up. Sinnot-Armstrong contrasts the interpretive methods used by good philosophers and fundamentalist believers: Good philosophers face objections and uncertainties. They follow where arguments lead, even when their conclusions are surprising and disturbing. Intellectual honesty is also required of scholars who interpret philosophical texts. If I had distorted Kant’s view to make him reach a conclusion (...)
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  31. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). The One Paradigm to Rule Them All. In D. A. Kowalski (ed.), The Big Bang Theory and Philosophy.score: 21.0
    A humorous treatment of scientism within the context of the television series, The Big Bang Theory.
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  32. Rachel Barney (2008). The Carpenter and the Good. In D. Cairns, F. G. Herrmann & T. Penner (eds.), Pursuing the Good: Ethics and Metaphysics in Plato's Republic. University of Edinburgh.score: 21.0
    Among Aristotle’s criticisms of the Form of the Good is his claim that the knowledge of such a Good could be of no practical relevance to everyday rational agency, e.g. on the part of craftspeople. This critique turns out to hinge ultimately on the deeply different assumptions made by Plato and Aristotle about the relation of ‘good’ and ‘good for’. Plato insists on the conceptual priority of the former; and Plato wins the argument.
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  33. Omar W. Nasim (2012). The Spaces of Knowledge: Bertrand Russell, Logical Construction, and the Classification of the Sciences. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1163-1182.score: 21.0
    What Russell regarded to be the ?chief outcome? of his 1914 Lowell Lectures at Harvard can only be fully appreciated, I argue, if one embeds the outcome back into the ?classificatory problem? that many at the time were heavily engaged in. The problem focused on the place and relationships between the newly formed or recently professionalized disciplines such as psychology, Erkenntnistheorie, physics, logic and philosophy. The prime metaphor used in discussions about the classificatory problem by British philosophers was a spatial (...)
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  34. Tuncay Saygin (2008). “SECULARISM” FROM THE LAST YEARS OF THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE TO THE EARLY TURKISH REPUBLIC. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (20):26-78.score: 21.0
    The main aim of this article is to discuss both the concept of secularism among the Ottoman intellectuals and the principle of secularism during the period of the Turkish Republic based on ideas rather than practice. We can analyze “secularism in Turkey” in two separate periods of time: First, “The Ottoman Empire and Secularism” which discusses the ideas of secularism before the foundation of the Turkish Republic, and second “A Brief Analysis of the Turkish Republic and the Principle of Secularism” (...)
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  35. Colin R. Marshall (2009). The Mind and the Body as 'One and the Same Thing' in Spinoza. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (5):897-919.score: 21.0
    I argue that, contrary to how he is often read, Spinoza did not believe that the mind and the body were numerically identical. This means that we must find some alternative reading for his claims that they are 'one and the same thing' (I describe three such alternative readings).
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  36. Mark Rowlands (2007). Understanding the "Active" in "Enactive&Quot;. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):427-443..score: 21.0
    Much recent work on cognition is characterized by an augmentation of the role of action coupled with an attenuation of the role of representation. This coupling is no accident. The appeal to action is seen either as a way of explaining representation or explaining it away. This paper argues that the appeal to action as a way of explaining, supplementing, or even supplanting, representation can lead to a serious dilemma. On the one hand, the concept of action to which we (...)
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  37. Sacha Golob (2013). Heidegger on Kant, Time and the 'Form' of Intentionality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):345 - 367.score: 21.0
    Between 1927 and 1936, Martin Heidegger devoted almost one thousand pages of close textual commentary to the philosophy of Immanuel Kant. This article aims to shed new light on the relationship between Kant and Heidegger by providing a fresh analysis of two central texts: Heidegger’s 1927/8 lecture course Phenomenological Interpretation of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and his 1929 monograph Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics. I argue that to make sense of Heidegger’s reading of Kant, one must resolve two (...)
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  38. C. T. Ricciardone (forthcoming). &Quot;we Are the Disease&Quot;: Truth, Health, and Politics From Plato's Gorgias to Foucault. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.score: 21.0
    Starting from the importance of the figure of the parrhesiastes—the political and therapeutic truth-teller—for Foucault’s understanding of the care of the self, this paper traces the political figuration of the analogy between philosophers and physicians on the one hand, and rhetors and disease on the other in Plato’s Gorgias. I show how rhetoric, in the form of ventriloquism, infects the text itself, and then ask how we account for the effect of the “contaminated” philosophical dialogue on our readerly health. Is (...)
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  39. Joel Smith (2010). The Conceptual Problem of Other Bodies. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 110 (2pt2):201-217.score: 21.0
    The, so called, ‘conceptual problem of other minds’ has been articulated in a number of different ways. I discuss two, drawing out some constraints on an adequate account of the grasp of concepts of mental states. Distinguishing between behaviour-based and identity-based approaches to the problem, I argue that the former, exemplified by Brewer and Pickard, are incomplete as they presuppose, but do not provide an answer to, what I shall call the conceptual problem of other bodies. I end with some (...)
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  40. James Kreines (forthcoming). Kant and Hegel on Teleology and Life From the Perspective of Debates About Free Will. In Thomas Khurana (ed.), THE FREEDOM OF LIFE. Hegelian Perspectives. Walther König.score: 21.0
    Kant’s treatment of teleology and life in the Critique of the Power of Judgment is complicated and difficult to interpret; Hegel’s response adds considerable complexity. I propose a new way of understanding the underlying philosophical issues in this debate, allowing a better understanding of the underlying structure of the arguments in Kant and Hegel. My new way is unusual: I use for an interpretive lens some structural features of familiar debates about freedom of the will. These debates, I argue, allow (...)
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  41. Richard G. Henson (1979). What Kant Might Have Said: Moral Worth and the Overdetermination of Dutiful Action. Philosophical Review 88 (1):39-54.score: 21.0
    My purpose is to account for some oddities in what Kant did and did not say about "moral worth," and for another in what commentators tell us about his intent. The stone with which I hope to dispatch these several birds is-as one would expect a philosopher's stone to be-a distinction. I distinguish between two things Kant might have had in mind under the heading of moral worth. They come readily to mind when one both takes account of what he (...)
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  42. Rajesh Kasturirangan, Nirmalya Guha & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2011). Indian Cognitivism and the Phenomenology of Conceptualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):277-296.score: 21.0
    We perform conceptual acts throughout our daily lives; we are always judging others, guessing their intentions, agreeing or opposing their views and so on. These conceptual acts have phenomenological as well as formal richness. This paper attempts to correct the imbalance between the phenomenal and formal approaches to conceptualization by claiming that we need to shift from the usual dichotomies of cognitive science and epistemology such as the formal/empirical and the rationalist/empiricist divides—to a view of conceptualization grounded in the Indian (...)
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  43. Uriah Kriegel (2007). The Phenomenologically Manifest. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):115-136.score: 21.0
    Disputes about what is phenomenologically manifest in conscious experience have a way of leading to deadlocks with remarkable immediacy. Disputants reach the foot-stomping stage of the dialectic more or less right after declaring their discordant views. It is this fact, I believe, that leads some to heterophenomenology and the like attempts to found Consciousness Studies on purely third-person grounds. In this paper, I explore the other possible reaction to this fact, namely, the articulation of methods for addressing phenomenological disputes. I (...)
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  44. Wouter J. Hanegraaff (2008). Altered States of Knowledge: The Attainment of Gnōsis in the Hermetica. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):128-163.score: 21.0
    Research into the so-called “philosophical” Hermetica has long been dominated by the foundational scholarship of André-Jean Festugière, who strongly emphasized their Greek and philosophical elements. Since the late 1970s, this perspective has given way to a new and more complex one, due to the work of another French scholar, Jean-Pierre Mahé, who could profit from the discovery of new textual sources, and called much more attention to the Egyptian and religious dimensions of the hermetic writings. This article addresses the question (...)
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  45. Tadeusz Wieslaw Zawidzki (2012). Unlikely Allies: Embodied Social Cognition and the Intentional Stance. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):487-506.score: 21.0
    I argue that proponents of embodied social cognition (ESC) can usefully supplement their views if they enlist the help of an unlikely ally: Daniel Dennett. On Dennett’s view, human social cognition involves adopting the intentional stance (IS), i.e., assuming that an interpretive target’s behavior is an optimally rational attempt to fulfill some desire relative to her beliefs. Characterized this way, proponents of ESC would reject any alliance with Dennett. However, for Dennett, to attribute mental states from the intentional stance is (...)
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  46. Andrew Russo (2011). The Supervenience Argument Against Non-Reductive Physicalism. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 21.0
    This short paper is a "quick and dirty" introduction for non-philosophers (with some background in propositional logic) to Jaegwon Kim's famous supervenience argument against non-reductive physicalism (also known as the exclusion problem). It motivates the problem of mental causation, introduces Kim's formulation of the issue centered around mind-body supervenience, presents the argument in deductive form, and makes explicit why Kim concludes that vindicating mental causation demands a reduction of mind.
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  47. Dr H. Stefan Bracha (2006). Human Brain Evolution and the "Neuroevolutionary Time-Depth Principle:" Implications for the Reclassification of Fear-Circuitry-Related Traits in Dsm-V and for Studying Resilience to Warzone-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. .score: 21.0
    The DSM-III, DSM-IV, DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 have judiciously minimized discussion of etiologies to distance clinical psychiatry from Freudian psychoanalysis. With this goal mostly achieved, discussion of etiological factors should be reintroduced into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). A research agenda for the DSM-V advocated the "development of a pathophysiologically based classification system". The author critically reviews the neuroevolutionary literature on stress-induced and fear circuitry disorders and related amygdala-driven, species-atypical fear behaviors of clinical severity in (...)
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  48. Michael Wilby (2012). Embodying the False-Belief Tasks. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):519-540.score: 21.0
    Embodied approaches to mindreading have tended to define themselves in contrast to cognitive approaches to social mindreading. One side effect of this has been a lack of engagement with key areas in the study of social cognition—in particular the topic of how we gain an understanding of the referential nature of others’ thoughts, and how that understanding develops from infancy. I argue that embodied accounts of mindreading are well equipped to enter into this debate, by making use of the notion (...)
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  49. Yuichiro Amekawa (2009). Reflections on the Growing Influence of Good Agricultural Practices in the Global South. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):531-557.score: 21.0
    EurepGAP is a pioneering field level food safety protocol called ‘good agricultural practices’ currently exercising influence over the global food quality assurance system. Developed by a consortium of major European retailers, this private standard enforces codes of conduct that address issues of health and safety for producers and consumers, as well as working conditions and environmental management on the farmland. Despite various merits and benefits that the standard is premised to offer, the institutional design gives a financial edge to (...)
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  50. Susan Bredlau (2011). Monstrous Faces and a World Transformed: Merleau-Ponty, Dolezal, and the Enactive Approach on Vision Without Inversion of the Retinal Image. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):481-498.score: 21.0
    The world perceived by a person undergoing vision without inversion of the retinal image has traditionally been described as inverted. Drawing on the philosophical work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the empirical research of Hubert Dolezal, I argue that this description is more reflective of a representationist conception of vision than of actual visual experience. The world initially perceived in vision without inversion of the retinal image is better described as lacking in lived significance rather than inverted; vision without inversion of (...)
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