Search results for 'The Myth of the Given' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Refeng Tang (2010). Conceptualism and the New Myth of the Given. Synthese 175 (1):101 - 122.score: 297.0
    The motivation for McDowell’s conceptualism is an epistemological consideration. McDowell believes conceptualism would guarantee experience a justificatory role in our belief system and we can then avoid the Myth of the Given without falling into coherentism. Conceptualism thus claims an epistemological advantage over nonconceptualism. The epistemological advantage of conceptualism is not to be denied. But both Sellars and McDowell insist experience is not belief. This makes it impossible for experience to justify empirical knowledge, for the simple reason that (...)
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  2. Caleb Liang (2006). Phenomenal Character and the Myth of the Given. Journal of Philosophical Research 31:21-36.score: 210.8
    In “Sellars and the ‘Myth of the Given,’” Alston argues against Sellars’s position in “Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind” (EPM) that there is no nonconceptual cognition. According to him, Sellars ignores phenomenal look-concepts that capture the phenomenal character of experience. I contend that the Sellarsian can agree that the phenomenal aspect of looks should be accommodated, but he is not thereby forced to concede a form of the nonconceptual Given. I examine some of Alston’s arguments, especially (...)
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  3. Eric Watkins (2008). Kant and the Myth of the Given. Inquiry 51 (5):512 – 531.score: 203.3
    Sellars and McDowell, among others, attribute a prominent role to the Myth of the Given. In this paper, I suggest that they have in mind two different versions of the Myth of the Given and I argue that Kant is not the target of one version and, though explicitly under attack from the other, has resources sufficient to mount a satisfactory response. What is essential to this response is a proper understanding of (empirical) concepts as involving (...)
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  4. Robert Hanna (2011). The Myth of the Given and the Grip of the Given. Diametros 27:25-46.score: 203.3
    In this paper I argue that the Sellarsian Myth of the Given does not apply to all forms of Non-Conceptualism; that Kant is in fact a non-conceptualist of the right-thinking kind and not a Conceptualist, as most Kant-interpreters think; and that an intelligible and defensible Kantian Non-Conceptualism can be developed which supports the thesis that true perceptual beliefs are non-inferentially justified and also normatively funded by direct, embodied, intentional interactions with the manifest world (a.k.a. the Grip of the (...)
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  5. Dieter Freundlieb (2003). The Myth of the Given, Coherentism, and the Justification of Empirical Knowledge Claims. Idealistic Studies 33 (1):39-56.score: 203.3
    In this paper I make some critical comments on John McDowell’s Mind and World and offer suggestions as to how it might be possible to solve John McDowell’s problem of finding a safe passage between the Scylla of the “Myth of the Given” (Sellars) and the Charybdis of a Davidsonian linguistic coherentism. McDowell’s defense of a minimal empiricism depends on the largely unargued and ultimately untenable assumption that epistemic justification can only operate at the level of conceptual or (...)
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  6. Robert Hanna (2011). Beyond the Myth of the Myth: A Kantian Theory of Non-Conceptual Content. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):323 - 398.score: 201.0
    In this essay I argue that a broadly Kantian strategy for demonstrating and explaining the existence, semantic structure, and psychological function of essentially non-conceptual content can also provide an intelligible and defensible bottom-up theory of the foundations of rationality in minded animals. Otherwise put, if I am correct, then essentially non-conceptual content constitutes the semantic and psychological substructure, or matrix, out of which the categorically normative a priori superstructure of epistemic rationality and practical rationality - Sellars's "logical space of reasons" (...)
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  7. Ted Poston (2013). BonJour and the Myth of the Given. Res Philosophica 90 (2):185-201.score: 167.3
    The Sellarsian dilemma is a powerful argument against internalistic foundationalist views that aim to end the regress of reasons in experiential states. LaurenceBonJour once defended the soundness of this dilemma as part of a larger argument for epistemic coherentism. BonJour has now renounced his earlier conclusions about the dilemma and has offered an account of internalistic foundationalism aimed, in part, at showing the errors of his former ways. I contend that BonJour’s early concerns about the Sellarsian dilemma are correct, and (...)
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  8. Willem A. deVries (2011). Sellars and the Myth of the Given. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 167.3
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  9. Walter Hopp (2009). Conceptualism and the Myth of the Given. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):363-385.score: 158.3
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  10. J. -M. Roy (2003). Phenomenological Claims and the Myth of the Given. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (Supplement):1-32.score: 158.3
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  11. Laurence Foss (1968). The Myth of the Given. Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):36 - 57.score: 158.3
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  12. Yury Selivanov (forthcoming). The "Myth of the Given": The Hegelian Meditations of Wilfrid Sellars. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (4):677-692.score: 158.3
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  13. Yury Selivanov (2012). The “Myth of the Given”. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (4):677-692.score: 158.3
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  14. Roderick Chisholm (1998). 11 The Myth of the Given. In Alcoff Linda (ed.), Epistemology: The Big Questions. Blackwell. 169.score: 158.3
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  15. William P. Alston (2002). Sellars and the "Myth of the Given&Quot;. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):69-86.score: 155.3
  16. Charles Echelbarger (1974). Sellars on Thinking and the Myth of the Given. Philosophical Studies 25 (May):231-246.score: 155.3
  17. Eric Watkins (2012). Kant, Sellars, and the Myth of the Given. Philosophical Forum 43 (3):311-326.score: 155.3
  18. Raimo Tuomela (1988). The Myth of the Given and Realism. Erkenntnis 29 (2):181 - 200.score: 155.3
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  19. Rachael Wiseman (2009). Private Objects and the Myth of the Given. Philosophical Topics 37 (1):175-189.score: 155.3
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  20. Roderick Chisholm (1964). The Myth of the Given. In Roderick M. Chisholm (ed.), Philosophy. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall. 261--286.score: 155.3
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  21. Ray Brassier (2011). Lived Experience and the Myth of the Given: Bergson and Sellars. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (3):85 - +.score: 155.3
     
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  22. Richard McDonough (1999). The Myth of the Given: Sellars on Sentience Vs Sapience. [REVIEW] Metascience 8 (2):292-296.score: 155.3
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  23. Sung Uk Lim (2011). The Myth of Origin in Context Through the Lens of Deconstruction, Dialogism and Hybridity. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (29):112-131.score: 153.8
    The present study aims to deconstruct the myth of origin, a quest after essential identity, in the context of Japan's colonization of Korea (1910-1945). First, I will contextualize the myth of origin as a particular historical construction of Japanese colonization, which stems from Romantic nationalism in the second half of the 19 th century. Then, I will critique the structuralism, monologism, and colonialism standing behind the myth of origin through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity: (1) (...)
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  24. Andrew R. Bailey (2004). The Myth of the Myth of the Given. Manuscrito 27 (2):321-60.score: 153.0
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  25. Thomas Vinci, The Myth of the Myth of the Given. Problems From Wilfrid Sellars- Writing on Sellars.score: 153.0
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  26. Michael Goldman (1988). Rorty's New Myth of the Given. Metaphilosophy 19 (2):105–112.score: 153.0
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  27. Mark Brunger (2014). Exploring the Myth of the Bobby and the Intrusion of the State Into Social Space. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (1):121-134.score: 153.0
    This paper aims to increase the reader’s understanding of how the notion of the ‘bobby on the beat’ has been elevated to iconic, if not mythical, status within British policing. In doing so, the article utilises the semiotic idea of myth, as conceptualized by Roland Barthes, to explore how through representations of the ‘bobby on the beat’ police officers have been projected in a more avuncular re-assuring role to a public fearful of crime, which fails to do service to (...)
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  28. Hindu Nationalism Postmodernism (2005). Inthis Chapter I First Examine How Hindu Nationalists Construct the Myth of ''the Vedas as Books of Science.''I Claim That the Relativist Rhetoric of Postmodern Intellectuals has Given Philosophical Respectability to the Eclectic Patchwork of Science and Hindu Metaphysics That Goes Under the Name of ''Vedic Science.''I Argue That the Mixing Up of the Mythos of the Vedas with the Logos of Science Must Be of Great Concern Not Just to the Scientific Community, but Also to Religious People, for It is a Distortion of Both Science and Spirituality. [REVIEW] In Noretta Koertge (ed.), Scientific Values and Civic Virtues. Oup Usa.score: 153.0
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  29. R. Gloznek (2003). W. Sellars's Myth of the Given. Filozofia 58 (7):462-470.score: 153.0
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  30. Hindu Nationalism Postmodernism (2005). In This Chapter I First Examine How Hindu Nationalists Construct the Myth of ''the Vedas as Books of Science.''I Claim That the Relativist Rhetoric of Postmodern Intellectuals has Given Philosophical Respectability to the Eclectic Patchwork of Science and Hindu Metaphysics That Goes Under the Name of ''Vedic Science.''I Argue That the Mixing Up of the Mythos of the Vedas with the Logos of Science Must Be of Great Concern Not Just to the Scientific Community, but Also to Religious People, for It is a Distortion of Both Science and Spirituality. [REVIEW] In Noretta Koertge (ed.), Scientific Values and Civic Virtues. Oup Usa.score: 153.0
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  31. Evan Fales (1996). A Defense of the Given. Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.score: 151.5
    The Doctrine of the Given The Myth of the Given A Methodological Problem To a convinced foundationalist, the project of establishing the existence of the ...
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  32. Graham White (2011). Bootstrapping Normativity. Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):35-53.score: 150.0
    We compare the role of Cartesian assumptions in the symbol grounding problem and in the Myth of the Given: We argue that the Sellars–McDowell critique of the Myth of the Given and, in particular, its use of the concept of normativity can provide useful resources for responding to the symbol grounding problem. We also describe the concepts of normativity at work in computer science and cognitive science: We argue that normative concepts are pervasive in the sciences (...)
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  33. Hao Tang (2014). “It is Not a Something, but Not a Nothing Either!”—McDowell on Wittgenstein. Synthese 191 (3):557-567.score: 150.0
    This paper corrects a mistake in John McDowell’s influential reading of Wittgenstein’s attack on the idea of private sensations. McDowell rightly identifies a primary target of Wittgenstein’s attack to be the Myth of the Given. But he also suggests that Wittgenstein, in the ferocity of his battles with this myth, sometimes goes into overkill, which manifests itself in seemingly behavioristic denials about sensations. But this criticism of Wittgenstein is a mistake. The mistake is made over two important (...)
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  34. Wang Keping (2009). Plato's Poetic Wisdom in the Myth of Er. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):282 - 293.score: 147.8
    The interlink between myth and wisdom in Hellenic heritage is characteristically embodied in the Platonic philosophizing as regards the education and enculturation of the human psyche. As is read in the end of The Republic, the myth of Er turns out to be a philosophical rewriting of poetry to a large degree. For it engagingly reveals Plato's moral inculcation, philosophical instruction and poetic wisdom in particular, all of which are intended to guide human conduct along the right track (...)
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  35. Kegan Paul, The Myth of the Mind.score: 142.5
    Of course, I do not mean by the title of this paper to deny the existence of something called ‘the mind’. But I do mean to call into question appeals to it in analyzing cognitive notions such as understanding and knowing, where its domain is taken to be independent of what one might find out in cognitive science. In this respect, I am expressing the skepticism of Sellars in “Empiricism and the philosophy of mind” [1956], where he explodes, not (...)
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  36. Keping Wang (2009). Plato's Poetic Wisdom in the Myth of Er. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):282-293.score: 141.8
    The interlink between myth and wisdom in Hellenic heritage is characteristically embodied in the Platonic philosophizing as regards the education and enculturation of the human psyche. As is read in the end of The Republic , the myth of Er turns out to be a philosophical rewriting of poetry to a large degree. For it engagingly reveals Plato’s moral inculcation, philosophical instruction and poetic wisdom in particular, all of which are intended to guide human conduct along the right (...)
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  37. Derek Allan (2009). 'Reckless Inaccuracies Abounding': André Malraux and the Birth of a Myth. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):147-158..score: 139.5
    After an initial period of popularity in the 1960s and 1970s, André Malraux’s works on the theory of art, "The Voices of Silence" and "The Metamorphosis of the Gods", lapsed into relative obscurity. A major factor in this fall from grace was the frosty reception given to these works by a number of leading art historians, including E.H. Gombrich, who accused Malraux of an irresponsible approach to art history and of "reckless inaccuracies". This essay examines a representative sample of (...)
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  38. Dominic Griffiths (2007). Reading Elements of the Later Heidegger as Myth. Phronimon 8 (2):25-34.score: 138.8
    The aim of this paper is to read Martin Heidegger’s later philosophy in terms of the assertion that themes such as the fourfold (das Geviert) and poetic dwelling could be interpreted as mythical elements within his writing. Heidegger’s later thought is often construed as challenging and difficult due to its quasi-mystical nature. However, this paper aims to illustrate that if one approaches his later thought from the perspective of myth, a different dimension of Heidegger’s thinking is revealed which is (...)
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  39. Aaron Allen Schiller (2007). Psychological Nominalism and the Plausibility of Sellars's Myth of Jones. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):435-454.score: 138.8
    Part of Sellars’s general attack on the Myth of the Given is his endorsement of psychological nominalism, a view that implies that awareness of our own mental states is not given but must be earned.Sellars provides an account of how such awareness might have been earned with the Myth of Jones. Such an account is important for Sellars, for without it the Given can look necessary after all. But aproblem with such accounts is that they (...)
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  40. Byeong D. Lee (2013). Fales's Defense of the Given and Requirements for Being a Reason. Philosophia 41 (4):1217-1235.score: 138.8
    Fales defends the doctrine of the given against the Sellarsian dilemma. On his view, sensory experiences, to which one has direct access, can justify basic beliefs. He upholds this view by way of defending an expansive conception of inference, according to which a broadly inferential relation can hold between sensory experiences and perceptual beliefs. The purpose of this paper is to show that Fales’s defense of the given fails. For this purpose, I argue that there are two requirements (...)
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  41. Paolo Tripodi (2013). A Myth to Kill a Myth? On McDowell's Interpretation of Sellars' Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind. Theoria 79 (4):353-377.score: 136.5
    According to McDowell, in Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind the myth of Jones has the purpose of completing the account of experience that Sellars needs to argue against traditional empiricism. In particular, on McDowell's view the myth of Jones should explain how to conceive of non-inferentially knowable experiences as containing propositional claims. This article argues that the myth of Jones does not succeed in providing such an account, especially on McDowell's own terms: assuming McDowell's epistemological distinction (...)
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  42. Carl Anders Säfström (2010). The Immigrant has No Proper Name: The Disease of Consensual Democracy Within the Myth of Schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):606-617.score: 136.5
    In this article I discuss the role of the immigrant in Swedish society and especially how such a role is construed through what I call the myth of schooling, that is, the normalization of an arbitrary distribution of wealth and power. I relate this myth to the idea of consensual democracy as it is expressed through an implicit idea of what it means to be Swedish. I not only critique the processes through which immigrants are discriminated against or (...)
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  43. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2007). The Return of the Myth of the Mental. Inquiry 50 (4):352 – 365.score: 135.8
    McDowell's claim that "in mature human beings, embodied coping is permeated with mindedness",1 suggests a new version of the mentalist myth which, like the others, is untrue to the phenomenon. The phenomena show that embodied skills, when we are fully absorbed in enacting them, have a kind of non-mental content that is non-conceptual, non-propositional, non-rational and non-linguistic. This is not to deny that we can monitor our activity while performing it. For solving problems, learning a new skill, receiving coaching, (...)
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  44. Jay F. Rosenberg (2006). Still Mythic After All Those Years: On Alston's Latest Defense of the Given. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (1):157-173.score: 135.8
    Wilfrid Sellars' conclusion in "Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind" that "the Given" is a "Myth" quickly elicited philosophical opposition and remains contentious fifty years later. William Alston has challenged that conclusion on several occasions by attempting to devise an acceptable account of perception committed to the givenness of perceived objects. His most recent challenge advances a "Theory of Appearing" which posits irreducible non-conceptual relations, ostensibly overlooked by Sellars, e.g., of "looking red", between the subject and the object (...)
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  45. Gregory M. Nixon (2010). Myth and Mind: The Origin of Consciousness in the Discovery of the Sacred. Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (3):289-337.score: 134.0
    By accepting that the formal structure of human language is the key to understanding the uniquity of human culture and consciousness and by further accepting the late appearance of such language amongst the Cro-Magnon, I am free to focus on the causes that led to such an unprecedented threshold crossing. In the complex of causes that led to human being, I look to scholarship in linguistics, mythology, anthropology, paleontology, and to creation myths themselves for an answer. I conclude that prehumans (...)
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  46. Rune Graulund (2009). From (B)Edouin to (A)Borigine: The Myth of the Desert Noble Savage. History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):79-104.score: 132.8
    This article examines the myth of the supposed superiority of the desert noble savage over civilized man. With the Bedouin of Arabia and the Aborigines of Australia as its two prime examples, the article argues that two versions of this myth can be traced: one in which the desert noble savage is valorized due to his valour, physical prowess and martial skill (Bedouin); and another, later version, where the desert noble savage is valorized as a pacifist, an ecologist (...)
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  47. Rodica Frentiu (2013). Kenzaburō Ōe, The Silent Cry (Man'en Gannen No Futtobōru): The Game of Sacred Violence Between Myth, Logos and History in the Japanese Cultural Matrix. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (36):22-50.score: 130.5
    Studies of mythology and the philosophy of religions ascribe violence an important role in understanding traditional societies. Whether perceived as sacred and capable of renewing the world, or as oppressive and destructive, violence acquires a twofold valence, whose constituents are interpreted in a complementary relation of interdependence and entail a world outlook with profound implications. Retrieving this ambiguous dimension of religious violence, Kenzaburō Ōe’s novel imagines, against the historical background of post-war Japanese society, a game that enacts the eternal rivalry (...)
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  48. Daniel Howard-Snyder (1998). BonJour's 'Basic Antifoundationalist Argument' and the Doctrine of the Given. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):163-177.score: 129.0
    Laurence BonJour observes that critics of foundationalism tend to argue against it by objecting to "relatively idiosyncratic" versions of it, a strategy which has "proven in the main to be superficial and ultimately ineffective" since answers immune to the objections emerge quickly (1985: 17). He aims to rectify this deficiency. Specifically, he argues that the very soul of foundationalism, "the concept of a basic empirical belief," is incoherent (1985: 30). This is a bold strategy from which we can learn even (...)
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  49. Randy L. Friedman (2007). Traditions of Pragmatism and the Myth of the Emersonian Democrat. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (1):154-184.score: 129.0
    : Beginning with Emerson's turn from his pulpit, many argue that American philosophy has rigorously held forth against supernaturalism and metaphysics. While most read self-reliance as a call for individualism, I argue that self-reliance is the application of the moral sentiment to the source of existence Emerson calls the Over-soul. Figures like George Kateb, Stanley Cavell, and Jeffrey Stout have presented a very different picture of American pragmatism. Stout, in particular, is responsible for building up what I call "the (...) of the Emersonian democrat." We find that a few philosophical positions generally constitute this myth. The Emersonian democrat is secular, sceptical, relativist, anti-realist, and anti-metaphysical. In fact, on my reading of the strand of pragmatism running from Emerson through James to Dewey, the pluralism of the Emersonian democrat depends on certain metaphysical commitments. The traditional reading of Emerson as anti-religion, and by extension, anti-religious, impedes a better understanding of self-reliance and obfuscates some of the Emersonian inheritances in James and Dewey. (shrink)
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