Search results for 'The Myth of the Given' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Refeng Tang (2010). Conceptualism and the New Myth of the Given. Synthese 175 (1):101 - 122.score: 1596.0
    The motivation for McDowell’s conceptualism is an epistemological consideration. McDowell believes conceptualism would guarantee experience a justificatory role in our belief system and we can then avoid the Myth of the Given without falling into coherentism. Conceptualism thus claims an epistemological advantage over nonconceptualism. The epistemological advantage of conceptualism is not to be denied. But both Sellars and McDowell insist experience is not belief. This makes it impossible for experience to justify empirical knowledge, for the simple reason that (...)
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  2. Terence Rajivan Edward (forthcoming). From the Myth of the Given to Radical Conceptual Diversity. Organon F.score: 1527.0
    This paper evaluates the following argument, suggested in the writings of Donald Davidson: if there is such a thing as the given, then there can be alternative conceptual schemes; there cannot be alternative conceptual schemes; therefore there is no such thing as the given.
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  3. Caleb Liang (2006). Phenomenal Character and the Myth of the Given. Journal of Philosophical Research 31:21-36.score: 1257.0
    In “Sellars and the ‘Myth of the Given,’” Alston argues against Sellars’s position in “Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind” (EPM) that there is no nonconceptual cognition. According to him, Sellars ignores phenomenal look-concepts that capture the phenomenal character of experience. I contend that the Sellarsian can agree that the phenomenal aspect of looks should be accommodated, but he is not thereby forced to concede a form of the nonconceptual Given. I examine some of Alston’s arguments, especially (...)
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  4. Eric Watkins (2008). Kant and the Myth of the Given. Inquiry 51 (5):512 – 531.score: 1227.0
    Sellars and McDowell, among others, attribute a prominent role to the Myth of the Given. In this paper, I suggest that they have in mind two different versions of the Myth of the Given and I argue that Kant is not the target of one version and, though explicitly under attack from the other, has resources sufficient to mount a satisfactory response. What is essential to this response is a proper understanding of (empirical) concepts as involving (...)
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  5. Robert Hanna (2011). The Myth of the Given and the Grip of the Given. Diametros 27:25-46.score: 1227.0
    In this paper I argue that the Sellarsian Myth of the Given does not apply to all forms of Non-Conceptualism; that Kant is in fact a non-conceptualist of the right-thinking kind and not a Conceptualist, as most Kant-interpreters think; and that an intelligible and defensible Kantian Non-Conceptualism can be developed which supports the thesis that true perceptual beliefs are non-inferentially justified and also normatively funded by direct, embodied, intentional interactions with the manifest world (a.k.a. the Grip of the (...)
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  6. Dieter Freundlieb (2003). The Myth of the Given, Coherentism, and the Justification of Empirical Knowledge Claims. Idealistic Studies 33 (1):39-56.score: 1227.0
    In this paper I make some critical comments on John McDowell’s Mind and World and offer suggestions as to how it might be possible to solve John McDowell’s problem of finding a safe passage between the Scylla of the “Myth of the Given” (Sellars) and the Charybdis of a Davidsonian linguistic coherentism. McDowell’s defense of a minimal empiricism depends on the largely unargued and ultimately untenable assumption that epistemic justification can only operate at the level of conceptual or (...)
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  7. Ted Poston (2013). BonJour and the Myth of the Given. Res Philosophica 90 (2):185-201.score: 1083.0
    The Sellarsian dilemma is a powerful argument against internalistic foundationalist views that aim to end the regress of reasons in experiential states. LaurenceBonJour once defended the soundness of this dilemma as part of a larger argument for epistemic coherentism. BonJour has now renounced his earlier conclusions about the dilemma and has offered an account of internalistic foundationalism aimed, in part, at showing the errors of his former ways. I contend that BonJour’s early concerns about the Sellarsian dilemma are correct, and (...)
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  8. Willem A. deVries (2011). Sellars and the Myth of the Given. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 1083.0
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  9. Walter Hopp (2009). Conceptualism and the Myth of the Given. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):363-385.score: 1047.0
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  10. J. -M. Roy (2003). Phenomenological Claims and the Myth of the Given. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (Supplement):1-32.score: 1047.0
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  11. Laurence Foss (1968). The Myth of the Given. Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):36 - 57.score: 1047.0
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  12. Yury Selivanov (forthcoming). The "Myth of the Given": The Hegelian Meditations of Wilfrid Sellars. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (4):677-692.score: 1047.0
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  13. Roderick Chisholm (1998). 11 The Myth of the Given. In Alcoff Linda (ed.), Epistemology: The Big Questions. Blackwell. 169.score: 1047.0
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  14. Yury Selivanov (2012). The “Myth of the Given”. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (4):677-692.score: 1047.0
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  15. Robert Hanna (2011). Beyond the Myth of the Myth: A Kantian Theory of Non-Conceptual Content. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (3):323 - 398.score: 1044.0
    In this essay I argue that a broadly Kantian strategy for demonstrating and explaining the existence, semantic structure, and psychological function of essentially non-conceptual content can also provide an intelligible and defensible bottom-up theory of the foundations of rationality in minded animals. Otherwise put, if I am correct, then essentially non-conceptual content constitutes the semantic and psychological substructure, or matrix, out of which the categorically normative a priori superstructure of epistemic rationality and practical rationality - Sellars's "logical space of reasons" (...)
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  16. William P. Alston (2002). Sellars and the "Myth of the Given&Quot;. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):69-86.score: 1035.0
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  17. Charles Echelbarger (1974). Sellars on Thinking and the Myth of the Given. Philosophical Studies 25 (May):231-246.score: 1035.0
  18. Eric Watkins (2012). Kant, Sellars, and the Myth of the Given. Philosophical Forum 43 (3):311-326.score: 1035.0
  19. Raimo Tuomela (1988). The Myth of the Given and Realism. Erkenntnis 29 (2):181 - 200.score: 1035.0
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  20. Rachael Wiseman (2009). Private Objects and the Myth of the Given. Philosophical Topics 37 (1):175-189.score: 1035.0
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  21. Roderick Chisholm (1964). The Myth of the Given. In Roderick M. Chisholm (ed.), Philosophy. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall. 261--286.score: 1035.0
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  22. Ray Brassier (2011). Lived Experience and the Myth of the Given: Bergson and Sellars. Filozofski Vestnik 32 (3):85 - +.score: 1035.0
     
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  23. Richard McDonough (1999). The Myth of the Given: Sellars on Sentience Vs Sapience. [REVIEW] Metascience 8 (2):292-296.score: 1035.0
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  24. Andrew R. Bailey (2004). The Myth of the Myth of the Given. Manuscrito 27 (2):321-60.score: 1020.0
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  25. Thomas Vinci, The Myth of the Myth of the Given. Problems From Wilfrid Sellars- Writing on Sellars.score: 1020.0
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  26. Michael Goldman (1988). Rorty's New Myth of the Given. Metaphilosophy 19 (2):105–112.score: 1020.0
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  27. Hindu Nationalism Postmodernism (2005). Inthis Chapter I First Examine How Hindu Nationalists Construct the Myth of ''the Vedas as Books of Science.''I Claim That the Relativist Rhetoric of Postmodern Intellectuals has Given Philosophical Respectability to the Eclectic Patchwork of Science and Hindu Metaphysics That Goes Under the Name of ''Vedic Science.''I Argue That the Mixing Up of the Mythos of the Vedas with the Logos of Science Must Be of Great Concern Not Just to the Scientific Community, but Also to Religious People, for It is a Distortion of Both Science and Spirituality. [REVIEW] In Noretta Koertge (ed.), Scientific Values and Civic Virtues. Oup Usa.score: 1020.0
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  28. R. Gloznek (2003). W. Sellars's Myth of the Given. Filozofia 58 (7):462-470.score: 1020.0
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  29. Hindu Nationalism Postmodernism (2005). In This Chapter I First Examine How Hindu Nationalists Construct the Myth of ''the Vedas as Books of Science.''I Claim That the Relativist Rhetoric of Postmodern Intellectuals has Given Philosophical Respectability to the Eclectic Patchwork of Science and Hindu Metaphysics That Goes Under the Name of ''Vedic Science.''I Argue That the Mixing Up of the Mythos of the Vedas with the Logos of Science Must Be of Great Concern Not Just to the Scientific Community, but Also to Religious People, for It is a Distortion of Both Science and Spirituality. [REVIEW] In Noretta Koertge (ed.), Scientific Values and Civic Virtues. Oup Usa.score: 1020.0
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  30. Carl B. Sachs (2014). Intentionality and the Myths of the Given. Pickering and Chatto.score: 937.0
    Intentionality is one of the central problems of modern philosophy. How can a thought, action or belief be about something? Sachs draws on the work of Wilfrid Sellars, C. I. Lewis and Maurice Merleau-Ponty to build a new theory of intentionality that solves many of the problems faced by traditional conceptions. In doing so, he sheds new light on Sellars’s influential arguments concerning the ‘Myth of the Given’ and shows how we can build a productive discourse between American (...)
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  31. Evan Fales (1996). A Defense of the Given. Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.score: 840.0
    The Doctrine of the Given The Myth of the Given A Methodological Problem To a convinced foundationalist, the project of establishing the existence of the ...
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  32. Kegan Paul, The Myth of the Mind.score: 810.0
    Of course, I do not mean by the title of this paper to deny the existence of something called ‘the mind’. But I do mean to call into question appeals to it in analyzing cognitive notions such as understanding and knowing, where its domain is taken to be independent of what one might find out in cognitive science. In this respect, I am expressing the skepticism of Sellars in “Empiricism and the philosophy of mind” [1956], where he explodes, not (...)
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  33. Derek Allan (2009). 'Reckless Inaccuracies Abounding': André Malraux and the Birth of a Myth. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):147-158..score: 786.0
    After an initial period of popularity in the 1960s and 1970s, André Malraux’s works on the theory of art, "The Voices of Silence" and "The Metamorphosis of the Gods", lapsed into relative obscurity. A major factor in this fall from grace was the frosty reception given to these works by a number of leading art historians, including E.H. Gombrich, who accused Malraux of an irresponsible approach to art history and of "reckless inaccuracies". This essay examines a representative sample of (...)
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  34. Aaron Allen Schiller (2007). Psychological Nominalism and the Plausibility of Sellars's Myth of Jones. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):435-454.score: 783.0
    Part of Sellars’s general attack on the Myth of the Given is his endorsement of psychological nominalism, a view that implies that awareness of our own mental states is not given but must be earned.Sellars provides an account of how such awareness might have been earned with the Myth of Jones. Such an account is important for Sellars, for without it the Given can look necessary after all. But aproblem with such accounts is that they (...)
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  35. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2007). The Return of the Myth of the Mental. Inquiry 50 (4):352 – 365.score: 777.0
    McDowell's claim that "in mature human beings, embodied coping is permeated with mindedness",1 suggests a new version of the mentalist myth which, like the others, is untrue to the phenomenon. The phenomena show that embodied skills, when we are fully absorbed in enacting them, have a kind of non-mental content that is non-conceptual, non-propositional, non-rational and non-linguistic. This is not to deny that we can monitor our activity while performing it. For solving problems, learning a new skill, receiving coaching, (...)
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  36. Jay F. Rosenberg (2006). Still Mythic After All Those Years: On Alston's Latest Defense of the Given. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (1):157-173.score: 777.0
    Wilfrid Sellars' conclusion in "Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind" that "the Given" is a "Myth" quickly elicited philosophical opposition and remains contentious fifty years later. William Alston has challenged that conclusion on several occasions by attempting to devise an acceptable account of perception committed to the givenness of perceived objects. His most recent challenge advances a "Theory of Appearing" which posits irreducible non-conceptual relations, ostensibly overlooked by Sellars, e.g., of "looking red", between the subject and the object (...)
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  37. Anne Wagner (2003). Translation of the Language of the Common Law Into Legal French: Myth or Reality. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 16 (2):177-193.score: 726.0
    Translating (and so construinga specialized source text) means producing afunctional text in a linguaculture target textthat is needed for specific communicativepurposes by processing the information given ina previous text in a different linguaculturesource text. Consequently, the comparison oflegal texts and terms from English to Frenchinevitably involves a theory of equivalence –if ever possible. The aim of this article is toreview the various hindrances or pitfalls inlegal translation and also a possible theory ofhow to avoid misunderstandings between thesource and the (...)
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  38. Adolf Grunbaum (1976). Is Preacceleration of Particles in Dirac's Electrodynamics a Case of Backward Causation? The Myth of Retrocausation in Classical Electrodynamics. Philosophy of Science 43 (2):165-201.score: 717.0
    Is it a "conceptual truth" or only a logically contingent fact that, in any given kind of case, an event x which asymmetrically causes ("produces") an event y likewise temporally precedes y or at least does not temporally succeed y? A bona fide physical example in which the cause retroproduces the effect would show that backward causation is no less conceptually possible than forward causation. And it has been claimed ([9], p. 151; [4], p. 41) that in Dirac's classical (...)
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  39. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2005). Overcoming the Myth of the Mental: How Philosophers Can Profit From the Phenomenology of Everyday Expertise. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 79 (2):47 - 65.score: 711.0
    Back in 1950, while a physics major at Harvard, I wandered into C.I. Lewis’s epistemology course. There, Lewis was confidently expounding the need for an indubitable Given to ground knowledge, and he was explaining where that ground was to be found. I was so impressed that I immediately switched majors from ungrounded physics to grounded philosophy.
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  40. Nicholas Evans & Stephen C. Levinson (2009). The Myth of Language Universals: Language Diversity and its Importance for Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):429-448.score: 705.0
    Talk of linguistic universals has given cognitive scientists the impression that languages are all built to a common pattern. In fact, there are vanishingly few universals of language in the direct sense that all languages exhibit them. Instead, diversity can be found at almost every level of linguistic organization. This fundamentally changes the object of enquiry from a cognitive science perspective. This target article summarizes decades of cross-linguistic work by typologists and descriptive linguists, showing just how few and unprofound (...)
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  41. D. Tulodziecki (forthcoming). Shattering the Myth of Semmelweis. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):1065-1075.score: 705.0
    The case of Semmelweis has been well known since Hempel. More recently, it has been revived by Peter Lipton, Donald Gillies, Alexander Bird, Alex Broadbent, and Raphael Scholl. While these accounts differ on what exactly the case of Semmelweis shows, they all agree that Semmelweis was an excellent reasoner. This widespread agreement has also given rise to a puzzle: why Semmelweis’s views were rejected for so long. I aim to dissolve both this puzzle and the standard view of Semmelweis (...)
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  42. Fritz J. McDonald (2014). Review of Heidi M. Ravven, The Self Beyond Itself: An Alternative History of Ethics, the New Brain Sciences, and the Myth of Free Will. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 7 (2):251-252.score: 693.0
    The Self Beyond Itself is a defense of an incompatibilist, hard determinist view of free will. Free will is here defined in a very strong sense, as the existence of actions that do not result from any causes other than the agent herself. The question of how to define free will, especially whether it consists in the ability to do otherwise, and what the ability to do otherwise amounts to, is not given much consideration in this book.Ravven frames her (...)
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  43. Henry Harris (ed.) (1995). Identity: Essays Based on Herbert Spencer Lectures Given in the University of Oxford. Clarendon Press.score: 678.0
    Who am I, and what am I? The question is one asked through the ages, answered in various ways in different disciplines. Identity is a matter of intellectual interest but also of personal and practical interest, attracting attention and stimulating controversy outside the ranks of the specialists. This volume offers a comparison and cross-fertilization of insights and theories from various disciplines in which identity is a key concept. -/- Identity contains essays by six internationally famous contributors, focusing on different facets (...)
     
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  44. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2006). Overcoming the Myth of the Mental. Topoi 25 (1-2):43-49.score: 672.0
    Can we accept John McDowell’s Kantian claim that perception is conceptual “all the way out,” thereby denying the more basic perceptual capacities we seem to share with prelinguistic infants and higher animals? More generally, can philosophers successfully describe the conceptual upper floors of the edifice of knowledge while ignoring the embodied coping going on on the ground floor? I argue that we shouldn’t leave the conceptual component of our lives hanging in midair and suggest how philosophers who want to understand (...)
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  45. Mark Brunger (2014). Exploring the Myth of the Bobby and the Intrusion of the State Into Social Space. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (1):121-134.score: 639.0
    This paper aims to increase the reader’s understanding of how the notion of the ‘bobby on the beat’ has been elevated to iconic, if not mythical, status within British policing. In doing so, the article utilises the semiotic idea of myth, as conceptualized by Roland Barthes, to explore how through representations of the ‘bobby on the beat’ police officers have been projected in a more avuncular re-assuring role to a public fearful of crime, which fails to do service to (...)
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  46. Sung Uk Lim (2011). The Myth of Origin in Context Through the Lens of Deconstruction, Dialogism and Hybridity. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (29):112-131.score: 636.8
    The present study aims to deconstruct the myth of origin, a quest after essential identity, in the context of Japan's colonization of Korea (1910-1945). First, I will contextualize the myth of origin as a particular historical construction of Japanese colonization, which stems from Romantic nationalism in the second half of the 19 th century. Then, I will critique the structuralism, monologism, and colonialism standing behind the myth of origin through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity: (1) (...)
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  47. John King-Farlow (1961). Myths of the Given and the Cogito Proof. Philosophical Studies 12 (4):49 - 53.score: 632.5
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  48. Wang Keping (2009). Plato's Poetic Wisdom in the Myth of Er. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):282 - 293.score: 618.8
    The interlink between myth and wisdom in Hellenic heritage is characteristically embodied in the Platonic philosophizing as regards the education and enculturation of the human psyche. As is read in the end of The Republic, the myth of Er turns out to be a philosophical rewriting of poetry to a large degree. For it engagingly reveals Plato's moral inculcation, philosophical instruction and poetic wisdom in particular, all of which are intended to guide human conduct along the right track (...)
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  49. Keping Wang (2009). Plato's Poetic Wisdom in the Myth of Er. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):282-293.score: 600.8
    The interlink between myth and wisdom in Hellenic heritage is characteristically embodied in the Platonic philosophizing as regards the education and enculturation of the human psyche. As is read in the end of The Republic , the myth of Er turns out to be a philosophical rewriting of poetry to a large degree. For it engagingly reveals Plato’s moral inculcation, philosophical instruction and poetic wisdom in particular, all of which are intended to guide human conduct along the right (...)
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