Search results for 'The World-Friend' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Jane Compson (1996). The Dalai Lama and the World Religions: A False Friend? Religious Studies 32 (2):271 - 279.
    The Dalai Lama is well known for his tolerance of other religious traditions, actively encouraging people to celebrate their own faiths rather than convert to Buddhism. However, far from being a pluralist as this attitude suggests, he believes that ultimate liberation is obtained only through the practice of Buddhist teachings. This apparent contradiction is resolved when one examines some of the teachings that he follows, such as the notions of emptiness (śūnyatā), skilful means (upāya), karma and rebirth. On such examination (...)
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  2. Qayyum A. Malick (1954). His Royal Highness Prince Aga Khan, Guide, Philosopher, and Friend of the World of Islam. Karachi, Ismailia Association, Pakistan.
     
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  3.  6
    Margaret H. Williams (2000). The People's Friend J. J. Meggitt: Paul, Poverty and Survival (Studies of the New Testament and its World). Pp. XIV + 268; Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1998. Cased. Isbn: 0-567-08604-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):137-.
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  4.  4
    Stephen R. Kaufman (2010). Religion: A Friend or Foe to Animals? Katherine Wills Perlo, Kinship and Killing: The Animal in World Religions. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009. 256 Pages. [REVIEW] Society and Animals 18 (2):228-229.
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  5.  19
    D. Wasserman (2014). When Bad People Do Good Things: Will Moral Enhancement Make the World a Better Place? Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):374-375.
    In his thoughtful defence of very modest moral enhancement, David DeGrazia1 makes the following assumption: ‘Behavioural improvement is highly desirable in the interest of making the world a better place and securing better lives for human beings and other sentient beings’. Later in the paper, he gives a list of some psychological characteristics that ‘all reasonable people can agree … represent moral defects’. I think I am a reasonable person, and I agree that most if not all items on the (...)
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  6.  3
    Gerard Delahoussaye (2010). Friend and Hero: Scotus's Quarrel with Aristotle Over the Kalon. Franciscan Studies 68 (1):97-135.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The more I love someone, the more firmly or steadily I love her – the more ready I am to act for her good; accordingly, the more I love someone the more prepared I am to suffer evil for her sake. My desire for her good makes me want to act for her good. I appeal to this love when deciding what I should do; and in acting I (...)
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  7. William B. Irvine (2015). Aha!: The Moments of Insight That Shape Our World. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Great ideas often develop gradually after studying a problem at length--but not always. Sometimes, an insight hits like a bolt from the blue. For Archimedes, clarity struck while he was taking a bath. For Gustav Mahler, it came as the blades of his oars touched the water. And for Albert Einstein, it emerged while he was talking to a friend. Why do these moments of insight strike so suddenly? Why do they so often come to us when we are focused (...)
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  8. Pierre Pachet (2007). The Authority of Poets in a World Without Authority. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (3):931-940.
    H. Arendt asserts that "in the modern world authority has disappeared almost to the vanishing point." However, she attributes some kind of authority to the words of poets, in the case discussed here, to those of her friend W. H. Auden. The precious gift of the poets to write poems that have an "unconstraining" power , gives that authority to their voice.
     
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  9.  4
    Aleksandar Boskovic (2005). The Image of the Other: Friend, Foreigner, Patriot? Filozofija I Društvo 28:95-115.
    The paper explores the imagery and constructions of alterity in the contemporary world. The image of the other is at the same time the image of ourselves, mostly through the metaphor of the “stranger.” This “stranger” represents the unknown, so he/she occasionally provokes fear and resentment, if only for appearing physically different in the “mainstream” culture. This paper traces the genesis and development of certain modernist ideals . The apparent lack of comprehension for others is just a symptom of the (...)
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  10.  8
    Norman Habel (1977). “Only the Jackal Is My Friend” On Friends and Redeemers in Job. Interpretation 31 (3):227-236.
    Trusting a friend without reservation in the face of an alien world is a major concern of the poet of Job who forces us to consider friendship as a radical option for life in an age of increased anonymity and contrived sensitivity.
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  11.  8
    Gail R. O'Day (2004). Jesus as Friend in the Gospel of John. Interpretation 58 (2):144-157.
    In popular image, Jesus as friend is sentimentalized, but not so in the Fourth Gospel. Jesus gave his life in love for others and always spoke and acted boldly—marks of friendship in the cultural world of the New Testament.
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  12.  8
    Michael Naas (2005). The World Over. Radical Philosophy Review 8 (2):123-130.
    Written in the days immediately following the death of Jacques Derrida on 9 October 2004, this essay attempts to bear witness tothe memory of Jacques Derrida as a writer and thinker and, even more personally, a mentor and friend. Written out of gratitude and affection, but also out of an almost overwhelming emotion, the essay is offered here, not without trepidation, in the hope that, in some small measure, the author’s emotion, affection, and genuine gratitude for the life and work (...)
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  13. David Chalmers (2012). Constructing the World. Oxford University Press.
  14. Theodore Sider (2011). Writing the Book of the World. Oxford University Press.
    In order to perfectly describe the world, it is not enough to speak truly. One must also use the right concepts - including the right logical concepts. One must use concepts that "carve at the joints", that give the world's "structure". There is an objectively correct way to "write the book of the world". Much of metaphysics, as traditionally conceived, is about the fundamental nature of reality; in the present terms, this is about the world's structure. Metametaphysics - inquiry into (...)
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  15.  32
    Alistair Welchman & Judith Norman (2010). Creating the Past: Schelling's Ages of the World. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (1):23-43.
    F.W.J. Schelling's Ages of the World has just begun to receive the critical attention it deserves as a contribution to the philosophy of history. Its most significant philosophical move is to pose the question of the origin of the past itself, asking what “caused” the past. Schelling treats the past not as a past present – but rather as an eternal past, a different dimension of time altogether, and one that was never a present 'now'. For Schelling, the past functions (...)
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  16.  3
    John Leslie (1996). The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. Routledge.
    Are we in imminent danger of extinction? Yes, we probably are, argues John Leslie in his chilling account of the dangers facing the human race as we approach the second millenium. The End of the World is a sobering assessment of the many disasters that scientists have predicted and speculated on as leading to apocalypse. In the first comprehensive survey, potential catastrophes - ranging from deadly diseases to high-energy physics experiments - are explored to help us understand the risks. One (...)
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  17.  5
    James Hill (forthcoming). Markus Gabriel Against the World. Sophia:1-11.
    According to Markus Gabriel, the world does not exist. This view—baptised metametaphysical nihilism—is exposited at length in his recent book Fields of Sense, which updates his earlier project of transcendental ontology. In this paper, I question whether meta-metaphysical nihilism is internally coherent, specifically whether the proposition ‘the world does not exist’ is expressible without performative contradiction on that view. Call this the inexpressibility objection. This is not an original objection—indeed it is anticipated in Gabriel’s book. However, I believe that his (...)
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  18.  22
    Marianna Papadopoulou & Roy Birch (2009). 'Being in the World': The Event of Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (3):270-286.
    This paper employs an eclectic mix of paradigms in order to discuss constituting characteristics of young children's learning experiences. Drawing upon a phenomenological perspective it examines learning as a form of 'Being' and as the result of learners' engagement with the world in their own, unique, intentional manners. The learners' intentions towards their world are expressed in everyday activity and participation. A social constructivist perspective is thus employed to present learning as situated in meaningful socio-cultural contexts of the everyday, lived (...)
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  19.  9
    Randy Ramal (2015). Religious Concepts and Absolute Conceptions of the World. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (2):89-103.
    In this essay I discuss several questions related to the manner in which concepts generally, and religious concepts in particular, are formed. Are some concepts necessary in the sense that, considering the physical makeup of the natural world and our own bio-chemical, perceptual, and cognitive nature, these concepts had to emerge by necessity? If we put considerations of divine revelations aside, I ask regarding religious concepts, what would be the proper way of looking at how they came to be formed? (...)
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  20.  1
    Juan Manuel Forte (2013). Pomponazzi y la eternidad del mundo: entre el problema neutro y el saber dialéctico= Pomponazzi and the eternity of the World: between the neutral problem and dialectical wisdom. Endoxa 31:279-298.
    In the last chapter of De immortalitate animae, Pomponazzi claims that the question of immortality, just like the question of the eternity of the world, is a neutral problem. In this paper I claim that Pomponazzi has usually considered the aeternitas mundi as a probable proposition in the Aristotelian sense, rather than as a problem. Furthermore, I evaluate some analyses that use the former issues (among others) to interpret Pomponazzi’s thought.
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  21.  97
    Noël B. Saenz (2014). The World and Truth About What Is Not. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):82-98.
    Truthmaker says that things, broadly construed, are the ontological grounds of truth and, therefore, that things make truths true. Recently, there have been a number of arguments purporting to show that if one embraces Truthmaker, then one ought to embrace Truthmaker Maximalism—the view that all non-analytic propositions have truthmakers. But then if one embraces Truthmaker, one ought to think that negative existentials have truthmakers. I argue that this is false. I begin by arguing that recent attempts by Ross Cameron and (...)
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  22.  32
    Robert Jackall (1988). Moral Mazes: The World of Corporate Managers. Oxford University Press.
    What is right in the corporation is not what is right in a man's home or in his church," a former vice-president of a large firm observes. "What is right in the corporation is what the guy above you wants from you." Such sentiments pervade American society, from corporate boardrooms to the basement of the White House. In Moral Mazes, Robert Jackall offers an eye-opening account of how corporate managers think the world works, and of how big organizations shape moral (...)
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  23.  18
    Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan (2010). The Weirdest People in the World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):61-83.
    Behavioral scientists routinely publish broad claims about human psychology and behavior in the world's top journals based on samples drawn entirely from Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) societies. Researchers assume that either there is little variation across human populations, or that these are as representative of the species as any other population. Are these assumptions justified? Here, our review of the comparative database from across the behavioral sciences suggests both that there is substantial variability in experimental results (...)
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  24. Nancy Cartwright (1999). The Dappled World: A Study of the Boundaries of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    It is often supposed that the spectacular successes of our modern mathematical sciences support a lofty vision of a world completely ordered by one single elegant theory. In this book Nancy Cartwright argues to the contrary. When we draw our image of the world from the way modern science works - as empiricism teaches us we should - we end up with a world where some features are precisely ordered, others are given to rough regularity and still others behave in (...)
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  25.  33
    Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth (1990). How Monkeys See the World: Inside the Mind of Another Species. University of Chicago Press.
    "This reviewer had to be restrained from stopping people in the street to urge them to read it: They would learn something of the way science is done,...
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  26.  31
    Susan Bredlau (2011). Monstrous Faces and a World Transformed: Merleau-Ponty, Dolezal, and the Enactive Approach on Vision Without Inversion of the Retinal Image. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):481-498.
    The world perceived by a person undergoing vision without inversion of the retinal image has traditionally been described as inverted. Drawing on the philosophical work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the empirical research of Hubert Dolezal, I argue that this description is more reflective of a representationist conception of vision than of actual visual experience. The world initially perceived in vision without inversion of the retinal image is better described as lacking in lived significance rather than inverted; (...) without inversion of the retinal image affects the very content of the perceived world, including, importantly, its expressions and conducts, and not merely the orientation of this content. Moreover, I argue that the enactive approach, rather than a representationist approach, is best able to account for the perception of the world, after prolonged vision without inversion of the retinal image, as both normal and upright, yet still different from the world seen previously. Finally, in their attention to the perception of other people’s facial expressions, I argue that Merleau-Ponty and Dolezal draw out the existential significance of the enactive approach. In encountering another person, the most pressing task is generally not to observe this person’s features but, instead, to engage with this person’s expressions. (shrink)
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  27. Alvin Plantinga (2006). Divine Action in the World (Synopsis). Ratio 19 (4):495–504.
    The following is a synopsis of the paper presented by Alvin Plantinga at the RATIO conference on The Meaning of Theism held in April 2005 at the University of Reading. The synopsis has been prepared by the Editor, with the author’s approval, from a handout provided by the author at the conference. The paper reflects on whether religious belief of a traditional Christian kind can be maintained consistently with accepting our modern scientific worldview. Many theologians, and also many scientists, maintain (...)
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  28. Nicholas Maxwell (2015). Can The World Learn Wisdom. Philosophy Now (108):32-35.
    The crisis of our times is that we have science without wisdom. All our current global problems have arisen as a result. Learning how to become wiser has become, not a luxury, but a necessity. The key is to learn from the success of science. We need to learn from scientific progress how to achieve social progress towards a wiser world. This is an old idea that goes back to the French Enlightenment. However, in developing the idea, the philosophes of (...)
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  29. John Henry McDowell (2009). Having the World in View: Essays on Kant, Hegel, and Sellars. Harvard University Press.
    In this new book, John McDowell builds on his much discussed Mind and World—one of the most highly regarded books in contemporary philosophy.
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  30.  12
    Wayne D. Gray & Wai‐Tat Fu (2004). Soft Constraints in Interactive Behavior: The Case of Ignoring Perfect Knowledge in‐the‐World for Imperfect Knowledge in‐the‐Head*,*. Cognitive Science 28 (3):359-382.
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  31.  39
    Jeffrey Satinover (2006). Quantum Theory and the Boundary Between Science and Spirit: Some Remarks From a Friend of Kabbalah. World Futures 62 (4):300 – 308.
    Physicists and philosophers argue whether quantum theory has spiritual implications. The vast majority of opinions are at two extremes: Some contend that quantum theory has absolutely no spiritual implications whatsoever, whereas others assert that it forms the very basis of a modern spirituality and can be directly applied to the human condition. It is this article's contention that neither extreme is correct. Quantum theory does have spiritual implications - a fact that its founders intuited and its enemies, Einstein preeminent among (...)
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  32.  64
    Steven French (2014). The Structure of the World: Metaphysics and Representation. OUP Oxford.
    Steven French articulates and defends the bold claim that there are no objects in the world. He draws on metaphysics and philosophy of science to argue for structural realism--the position that we live in a world of structures--and defends a form of eliminativism about objects that sets laws and symmetry principles at the heart of ontology.
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  33.  4
    Pieter Meurs (2011). The Bodily Excess of a Worldview: Beyond a Theoretical Account of the World. In D. Aerts, B. D'Hooghe & N. Note (eds.), Worldviews, Science and Us: Bridging Knowledge and Its Implications for Our Perspectives of the World. World Scientific
    Contemporary society engenders complex and controversial contradictions as a consequence of the schism between the experience of a rapidly changing world and the incapability or the lack of an appropriate view of that world. This is why we should encourage the efforts towards a global thought of the world. Such a worldview can help us to understand and explain reality. However, we should be critical towards a mere theoretical approach of that world. A worldview should not be confined to the (...)
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  34. Malcolm Bull (1996). Apocalypse Theory and the Ends of the World. Utopian Studies 7 (2):226-228.
     
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  35.  20
    David Kyle Johnson (2014). The Failure of the Multiverse Hypothesis as a Solution to the Problem of No Best World. Sophia 53 (4):447-465.
    The multiverse hypothesis is growing in popularity among theistic philosophers because some view it as the preferable way to solve certain difficulties presented by theistic belief. In this paper, I am concerned specifically with its application to Rowe’s problem of no best world, which suggests that God’s existence is impossible given the fact that the world God actualizes must be unsurpassable, yet for any given possible world, there is one greater. I will argue that, as a solution to the (...)
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  36. Robert Cooper & Demos (1996). The Post-Modern State and the World Order. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  37. A. G. Fraser (1920). The Gospel and the World. Hodder & Stoughton.
     
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  38. Robert Harvey (2003). Global Disorder: America and the Threat of World Conflict. Carroll & Graf.
    In 1990, when the Berlin Wall fell and the Cold War ended, economic and political analysts declared the world a safer place. But not political journalist Robert Harvey. The roar of international optimism only intensified the pangs of his geopolitical anxiety. In 1995, in The Return of the Strong, he warned Western democracies that the tides of economic globalization were sweeping the world toward a new crisis. Unfortunately, the attack on the World Trade Center in New York City on September (...)
     
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  39. T. H. Ho (2014). Naturalism and the Space of Reasons in Mind and World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):49-62.
    This paper aims to show that many criticisms of McDowell’s naturalism of second nature are based on what I call ‘the orthodox interpretation’ of McDowell’s naturalism. The orthodox interpretation is, however, a misinterpretation, which results from the fact that the phrase ‘the space of reasons’ is used equivocally by McDowell in Mind and World. Failing to distinguish two senses of ‘the space of reasons’, I argue that the orthodox interpretation renders McDowell’s naturalism inconsistent with McDowell’s Hegelian thesis that the conceptual (...)
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  40.  8
    Yrjö Sepänmaa (2008). Being the Centre of the World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:247-253.
    Aesthetics is about sensations, experiences and emotions – but also about the rational mind that guides them. At the centre lies the feeling, sensing and thinking individual. The world unfolds from within oneself. No matter how remote a spot one chooses, it becomes the centre of the world; everyone travels with his own centre of the world, inevitably. He is, I am, the centrepoint.
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  41.  45
    Paul McNamara (1993). Does the Actual World Actually Exist? Philosophical Studies 69 (1):59 - 81.
    Assuming minimal fine-individuation--that there are some necessarily equivalent intensional objects (e.g. propositions) that are nonetheless distinct objects, on standard actualist frameworks, the answer to our title question is "No". First I specify a fully cognitively accessible, purely qualitative maximal consistent state of affairs (MCS). (That there is an MCS that is either fully graspable or purely qualitative is in itself quite contrary to conventional dogma.) Then I identify another MCS, one necessarily equivalent to the first. It follows that there could (...)
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  42.  14
    Safro Kwame (2001). Philosophy and Social Justice in the World Today. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:201-207.
    From an African point of view, there is no social justice in the world today and, from that point of view, there may not be much difference between the African, African-American, Asian, or even Western perspectives. There may, however, be some difference in the reasons given in support of this perspective or, rather, conclusion. The African perspective is heavily influenced by events such as the trans-Atlantic slave trade, colonialism, and, more recently, by the report of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation (...)
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  43.  6
    Yrjö Sepänmaa (2008). Being the Centre of the World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:247-253.
    Aesthetics is about sensations, experiences and emotions – but also about the rational mind that guides them. At the centre lies the feeling, sensing and thinking individual. The world unfolds from within oneself. No matter how remote a spot one chooses, it becomes the centre of the world; everyone travels with his own centre of the world, inevitably. He is, I am, the centrepoint.
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  44.  6
    Christopher C. Yorke (2008). Cosmopolitanism, Minimal Morality, and the World-State. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:873-880.
    The similarities between the concept of cosmopolitanism and the concept of the world-state are, in some regards, fairly intuitive. At the very least, the theme of universalism is often seen as common to both. The precise form of a universalized ethical or political order, however, is not expressly conceptually determined by either cosmopolitanism or the world-state; both are susceptible to pluralist interpretations. Further, we cannot assume that an ethical concern will either motivate the creation of, or become a central policy (...)
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  45.  7
    Marc Joseph (2008). Language, the World and Spontaneity In Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:89-95.
    Wittgenstein’s early philosophy of language is shaped by his attention to Parmenides’ paradox of false propositions and the problem of the unity of the proposition. Wittgenstein (dis)solves these two (pseudo)problems through his discussion of the “internal pictorial relation” between propositions and states of affairs, which is an artifact of language and the world being “constructed according to a common logical pattern” (TLP 4.014). After examining these issues, I argue that this treatment points to a further problem, namely, the question of (...)
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  46.  7
    Rinalds Zembahs (2008). The World-Experience as 'Not-Feeling-at-Home'. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:191-197.
    This paper focuses on Italian philosopher’s Paolo Virno concept of public intellect. He starts from the analysis of emotions and dispositions as they appear in Martin Heidegger’s work Being and Time, and he undertakes na criticism of Heideggerian distinction between fear and anguish/anxiety. Virno argues that, incontemporary world, this distinction is becoming increasingly blurred, insofar as the so-called ‘substantial communities’ tend to disintegrate and human beings become more exposed to the world as such. This exposition to the world makes one (...)
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  47.  15
    Ömer Naci Soykan (2007). Looking at the World From Istanbul as a Metaphor. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:191-195.
    The problem of environment is the leading common problem of people living on Earth, the sky and soil of which have been polluted. I believe that pollution in a broad sense is the basis for all other important problems of this world. Man has polluted himself and Earth. In the former, which is called cultural pollution, man becomes alienated from other members of his own species and in the latter, which is called physical pollution, man becomes alienated from nature of (...)
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  48.  8
    Yrjö Sepänmaa (2008). Being the Centre of the World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:247-253.
    Aesthetics is about sensations, experiences and emotions – but also about the rational mind that guides them. At the centre lies the feeling, sensing and thinking individual. The world unfolds from within oneself. No matter how remote a spot one chooses, it becomes the centre of the world; everyone travels with his own centre of the world, inevitably. He is, I am, the centrepoint.
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  49. Yrjö Sepänmaa (2008). Being the Centre of the World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:247-253.
    Aesthetics is about sensations, experiences and emotions – but also about the rational mind that guides them. At the centre lies the feeling, sensing and thinking individual. The world unfolds from within oneself. No matter how remote a spot one chooses, it becomes the centre of the world; everyone travels with his own centre of the world, inevitably. He is, I am, the centrepoint.
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  50. Panu Raatikainen (2014). Chalmers' Blueprint of the World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):113-128.
    A critical notice of David J. Chalmers, Constructing the World (Oxford University Press,2012).
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