Search results for 'The World-Friend' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Qayyum A. Malick (1954). His Royal Highness Prince Aga Khan, Guide, Philosopher, and Friend of the World of Islam. Karachi, Ismailia Association, Pakistan.score: 87.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Marianna Papadopoulou & Roy Birch (2009). 'Being in the World': The Event of Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (3):270-286.score: 84.0
    This paper employs an eclectic mix of paradigms in order to discuss constituting characteristics of young children's learning experiences. Drawing upon a phenomenological perspective it examines learning as a form of 'Being' and as the result of learners' engagement with the world in their own, unique, intentional manners. The learners' intentions towards their world are expressed in everyday activity and participation. A social constructivist perspective is thus employed to present learning as situated in meaningful socio-cultural contexts of the everyday, lived (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Margaret H. Williams (2000). The People's Friend J. J. Meggitt: Paul, Poverty and Survival (Studies of the New Testament and its World). Pp. XIV + 268; Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1998. Cased. Isbn: 0-567-08604-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):137-.score: 84.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Stephen R. Kaufman (2010). Religion: A Friend or Foe to Animals? Katherine Wills Perlo, Kinship and Killing: The Animal in World Religions. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009. 256 Pages. [REVIEW] Society and Animals 18 (2):228-229.score: 81.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Mitchell (1984). Will the Real World Please Stand Up? Carbon Dioxide: Friend or Foe? An Inquiry Into the Climatic and Agricultural Consequences of the Rapidly Rising CO2Content of Earth's Atmosphere Sherwood B. Idso. Bioscience 34 (8):515-515.score: 81.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Susan Bredlau (2011). Monstrous Faces and a World Transformed: Merleau-Ponty, Dolezal, and the Enactive Approach on Vision Without Inversion of the Retinal Image. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):481-498.score: 77.0
    The world perceived by a person undergoing vision without inversion of the retinal image has traditionally been described as inverted. Drawing on the philosophical work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the empirical research of Hubert Dolezal, I argue that this description is more reflective of a representationist conception of vision than of actual visual experience. The world initially perceived in vision without inversion of the retinal image is better described as lacking in lived significance rather than inverted; vision without inversion of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David Kyle Johnson (forthcoming). The Failure of the Multiverse Hypothesis as a Solution to the Problem of No Best World. Sophia:1-19.score: 74.0
    The multiverse hypothesis is growing in popularity among theistic philosophers because some view it as the preferable way to solve certain difficulties presented by theistic belief. In this paper, I am concerned specifically with its application to Rowe’s problem of no best world, which suggests that God’s existence is impossible given the fact that the world God actualizes must be unsurpassable, yet for any given possible world, there is one greater. I will argue that, as a solution to the problem (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert Harvey (2003). Global Disorder: America and the Threat of World Conflict. Carroll & Graf.score: 74.0
    In 1990, when the Berlin Wall fell and the Cold War ended, economic and political analysts declared the world a safer place. But not political journalist Robert Harvey. The roar of international optimism only intensified the pangs of his geopolitical anxiety. In 1995, in The Return of the Strong, he warned Western democracies that the tides of economic globalization were sweeping the world toward a new crisis. Unfortunately, the attack on the World Trade Center in New York City on September (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Alistair Welchman & Judith Norman (2010). Creating the Past: Schelling's Ages of the World. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (1):23-43.score: 73.0
  10. T. H. Ho (2014). Naturalism and the Space of Reasons in Mind and World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):49-62.score: 72.0
    This paper aims to show that many criticisms of McDowell’s naturalism of second nature are based on what I call ‘the orthodox interpretation’ of McDowell’s naturalism. The orthodox interpretation is, however, a misinterpretation, which results from the fact that the phrase ‘the space of reasons’ is used equivocally by McDowell in Mind and World. Failing to distinguish two senses of ‘the space of reasons’, I argue that the orthodox interpretation renders McDowell’s naturalism inconsistent with McDowell’s Hegelian thesis that the conceptual (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Wayne D. Gray & Wai‐Tat Fu (2004). Soft Constraints in Interactive Behavior: The Case of Ignoring Perfect Knowledge in‐the‐World for Imperfect Knowledge in‐the‐Head*,*. Cognitive Science 28 (3):359-382.score: 70.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Yrjö Sepänmaa (2008). Being the Centre of the World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:247-253.score: 68.0
    Aesthetics is about sensations, experiences and emotions – but also about the rational mind that guides them. At the centre lies the feeling, sensing and thinking individual. The world unfolds from within oneself. No matter how remote a spot one chooses, it becomes the centre of the world; everyone travels with his own centre of the world, inevitably. He is, I am, the centrepoint.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ömer Naci Soykan (2007). Looking at the World From Istanbul as a Metaphor. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:191-195.score: 68.0
    The problem of environment is the leading common problem of people living on Earth, the sky and soil of which have been polluted. I believe that pollution in a broad sense is the basis for all other important problems of this world. Man has polluted himself and Earth. In the former, which is called cultural pollution, man becomes alienated from other members of his own species and in the latter, which is called physical pollution, man becomes alienated from nature of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Marc Joseph (2008). Language, the World and Spontaneity In Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:89-95.score: 68.0
    Wittgenstein’s early philosophy of language is shaped by his attention to Parmenides’ paradox of false propositions and the problem of the unity of the proposition. Wittgenstein (dis)solves these two (pseudo)problems through his discussion of the “internal pictorial relation” between propositions and states of affairs, which is an artifact of language and the world being “constructed according to a common logical pattern” (TLP 4.014). After examining these issues, I argue that this treatment points to a further problem, namely, the question of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Safro Kwame (2001). Philosophy and Social Justice in the World Today. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:201-207.score: 68.0
    From an African point of view, there is no social justice in the world today and, from that point of view, there may not be much difference between the African, African-American, Asian, or even Western perspectives. There may, however, be some difference in the reasons given in support of this perspective or, rather, conclusion. The African perspective is heavily influenced by events such as the trans-Atlantic slave trade, colonialism, and, more recently, by the report of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Christopher Yorke (2008). Cosmopolitanism, Minimal Morality, and the World-State. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:873-880.score: 68.0
    The similarities between the concept of cosmopolitanism and the concept of the world-state are, in some regards, fairly intuitive. At the very least, the theme of universalism is often seen as common to both. The precise form of a universalized ethical or political order, however, is not expressly conceptually determined by either cosmopolitanism or the world-state; both are susceptible to pluralist interpretations. Further, we cannot assume that an ethical concern will either motivate the creation of, or become a central policy (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Rinalds Zembahs (2008). The World-Experience as 'Not-Feeling-at-Home'. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:191-197.score: 68.0
    This paper focuses on Italian philosopher’s Paolo Virno concept of public intellect. He starts from the analysis of emotions and dispositions as they appear in Martin Heidegger’s work Being and Time, and he undertakes na criticism of Heideggerian distinction between fear and anguish/anxiety. Virno argues that, incontemporary world, this distinction is becoming increasingly blurred, insofar as the so-called ‘substantial communities’ tend to disintegrate and human beings become more exposed to the world as such. This exposition to the world makes one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Victor Petrenko (2008). Cross-Confessional Investigation of Religious Visions of the World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:271-278.score: 66.0
    The majority of world religions have developed in the course of overcoming tribal and clan identity. The idea of "One God" carries the implication, overtly or not, of uniting mankind on basis of religious belief. The rise of world religions was associated with rise of huge empires and states where various ethnic groups coexisted, not only on the basis of force alone, but also on basis of common religious belief and value systems imposed by religious ideology. Governing polyethnic territories, developments (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2001). Connecting Vision with the World: Tracking the Missing Link. In Joao Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 183.score: 65.0
    You might reasonably surmise from the title of this paper that I will be discussing a theory of vision. After all, what is a theory of vision but a theory of how the world is connected to our visual representations? Theories of visual perception universally attempt to give an account of how a proximal stimulus (presumably a pattern impinging on the retina) can lead to a rich representation of a three dimensional world and thence to either the recognition of known (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael S. Jones (2010). Carl E. Braaten, No Other Gospel! Christianity Among the World's Religions. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):162-167.score: 65.0
    Carl E. Braaten, No Other Gospel! Christianity among the World's Religions Minneapolis, USA: Fortress Press, 1992. Paperback: 146 pp. including endnotes and index.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Norman Habel (1977). “Only the Jackal Is My Friend” On Friends and Redeemers in Job. Interpretation 31 (3):227-236.score: 63.0
    Trusting a friend without reservation in the face of an alien world is a major concern of the poet of Job who forces us to consider friendship as a radical option for life in an age of increased anonymity and contrived sensitivity.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Gail R. O'Day (2004). Jesus as Friend in the Gospel of John. Interpretation 58 (2):144-157.score: 63.0
    In popular image, Jesus as friend is sentimentalized, but not so in the Fourth Gospel. Jesus gave his life in love for others and always spoke and acted boldly—marks of friendship in the cultural world of the New Testament.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mathew Abbott (2010). The Poetic Experience of the World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (4):493-516.score: 62.0
    In this article I develop Heidegger's phenomenology of poetry, showing that it may provide grounds for rejecting claims that he lapses into linguistic idealism. Proceeding via an analysis of the three concepts of language operative in the philosopher's work, I demonstrate how poetic language challenges language's designative and world-disclosive functions. The experience with poetic language, which disrupts Dasein's absorption by emerging out of equipmentality in the mode of the broken tool, brings Dasein to wonder at the world's existence in such (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Gila Sher (2011). Is Logic in the Mind or in the World? Synthese 181 (2):353 - 365.score: 62.0
    The paper presents an outline of a unified answer to five questions concerning logic: (1) Is logic in the mind or in the world? (2) Does logic need a foundation? What is the main obstacle to a foundation for logic? Can it be overcome? (3) How does logic work? What does logical form represent? Are logical constants referential? (4) Is there a criterion of logicality? (5) What is the relation between logic and mathematics?
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Christopher Menzel (2011). Knowledge Representation, the World Wide Web, and the Evolution of Logic. Synthese 182 (2):269-295.score: 62.0
    It is almost universally acknowledged that first-order logic (FOL), with its clean, well-understood syntax and semantics, allows for the clear expression of philosophical arguments and ideas. Indeed, an argument or philosophical theory rendered in FOL is perhaps the cleanest example there is of “representing philosophy”. A number of prominent syntactic and semantic properties of FOL reflect metaphysical presuppositions that stem from its Fregean origins, particularly the idea of an inviolable divide between concept and object. These presuppositions, taken at face value, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Michael L. Anderson (1997). Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 62.0
    "Content and Comportment argues persuasively that the answer to some long-standing questions in epistemology and metaphysics lies in taking up the neglected question of the role of our bodily activity in establishing connections between representational states?knowledge and belief in particular?and their objects in the world. It takes up these ideas from both current mainstream analytic philosophy?Frege, Dummett, Davidson, Evans?and from mainstream continental work?Heidegger and his commentators and critics?and bings them together successfully in a way that should surprise only those who (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jeremy R. Koons (2004). Disenchanting the World: McDowell, Sellars, and Rational Constraint by Perception. Journal of Philosophical Research 29 (February):125-152.score: 62.0
    In his book Mind and World, John McDowell grapples with the problem that the world must and yet seemingly cannot constrain our empirical thought. I first argue that McDowell’s proposed solution to the problem throws him onto the horns of his own, intractable dilemma, and thus fails to solve the problem of rational constraint by the world. Next, I will argue that Wilfrid Sellars, in a series of articles written in the 1950s and 60s, provides the tools to solve the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. David Szablowski (2002). Mining, Displacement and the World Bank: A Case Analysis of Compania Minera Antamina's Operations in Peru. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 39 (3):247 - 273.score: 62.0
    The transformation in the structure of the world mining industry over the last decade has opened up enormous new regions for mineral exploration and development by transnational mining companies in countries in the South. This new access has inevitably brought mining companies into conflict with local communities. With the involvement of transnational advocacy networks and new global publics, these conflicts have prompted a growing transnational debate on the principles that ought to govern mining and community relationships. One effort to provide (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jan Masschelein (2011). Experimentum Scholae: The World Once More … But Not (Yet) Finished. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):529-535.score: 62.0
    Inspired by Hannah Arendt, this contribution offers an exercise of thought as an attempt to distil anew the original spirit of what education means. It tries to articulate the event or happening that the word names, the experiences in which this happening manifests itself and the (material) forms that constitute it or make it find/take (its) place. Starting from the meaning of scholè as ‘free time’ or ‘undestined and unfinished time’ it further explores scholè as the time of attention which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael O'Donovan-Anderson (1997). Content and Comportment: On Embodiment and the Epistemic Availability of the World. Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.score: 62.0
    "Content and Comportment argues persuasively that the answer to some long-standing questions in epistemology and metaphysics lies in taking up the neglected question of the role of our bodily activity in establishing connections between representational states—knowledge and belief in particular—and their objects in the world. It takes up these ideas from both current mainstream analytic philosophy—Frege, Dummett, Davidson, Evans—and from mainstream continental work—Heidegger and his commentators and critics—and bings them together successfully in a way that should surprise only those who (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Gabriel Vacariu (forthcoming). The World Versus Epistemologically Different Worlds. Analele Philosophy Bucharest University.score: 62.0
    In this paper, Gabriel Vacariu presents his Epistemologically Different Worlds (EDWs) perspective. In other works (2005, 2008, 2011, 2012), he tries to illustrate that the greatest illusion of human knowledge surviving from the oldest times is the notion of „world”, of „uni-verse” or as he called it, the „unicorn world”. The main mistake that led to the creation of the unicorn world is that we, the human beings, believed (consciously or not) that we were the only observers of the “world”. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Weiqun Yao (2006). Buddhist Thought and Several Problems in the World Today. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):144-147.score: 62.0
    Buddhism has not only produced an influence upon the ancient world culture but is also playing an important role in world affairs today. This article analyzes several important problems in the world today: world peace, disarmament, economic justice, human rights, environmental protection, and universal cooperation in world problem solving. The writer holds that, to solve these problems, we should study Buddhist theory and get some helpful ideas from it.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Peter Loptson (2007). Re-Examining the 'End of History' Idea and World History Since Hegel. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:175-182.score: 62.0
    This paper offers an analysis of central features of modern world history which suggest a confirmation, and extension, of something resembling Fukuyama's Kojeve-Hegel *end of history' thesis. As is well known, Kojeve interpreted Hegel as having argued that in a meaningful sense history, as struggle and endeavour to achieve workable stasis in the mutual relations of selves and state-society collectivities, literally came to an end with Napoleon's 1806 victory at the battle of Jena. That victory led to the establishment or (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Gili S. Drori (ed.) (2003). Science in the Modern World Polity: Institutionalization and Globalization. Stanford University Press.score: 62.0
    This book presents empirical studies of the rise, expansion, and influence of scientific discourse and organization throughout the world, over the past century. Using quantitative cross-national data, it shows the impact of this scientized world polity on national societies. It examines how this world scientific system and national reflections of it have influenced a wide variety of institutional spheres—the economy, political systems, human rights, environmentalism, and organizational reforms. The authors argue that the triumph of science across social domains and around (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ambreena Manji (2003). Remortgaging Women's Lives: The World Bank'sLand Agenda in Africa. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11 (2):139-162.score: 62.0
    In recent months, the World Bank has issued a series of draft policy reports on land relations. This is the first time in over two decades that the Bank has sought to review its policy on lending in the land sector. Access to the draft reports and participation in the consultation process has, however, been severely limited. Nonetheless, the World Bank expects to issue the final Report by the end of this year. This paper presents a gender analysis of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Chansoo Park (2008). Plantinga and Leibniz's the best world. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:527-533.score: 62.0
    An atheist argument usually goes like this. If God exists and is omnipotent as believed, He could have created any possible world as he pleased. The existence of moral evil, though, makes problematic the existence of God, or His omnipotence at least. Plantinga's answer to an atheist is: it is not that God, as omnipotent, could have created any possible world as he pleased, but rather it is that God, even though omnipotent, could not have created the world as he (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Patrick Petitjean (2008). The Joint Establishment of the World Federation of Scientific Workers and of UNESCO After World War II. Minerva 46 (2):247-270.score: 62.0
    The World Federation of Scientific Workers (WFScW) and UNESCO share roots in the Social Relations of Science (SRS) movements and in the Franco-British scientific relations which developed in the 1930s. In this historical context (the Great Depression, the rise of Fascism and the Nazi use of science, the social and intellectual fascination for the USSR), a new model of scientific internationalism emerged, where science and politics mixed. Many progressive scientists were involved in the war efforts against Nazism, and tried to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Professor John R. Williams (2005). The Ethics Activities of the World Medical Association. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):7-12.score: 62.0
    Since its formation in 1947, the World Medical Association (WMA) has been a leading voice in international medical ethics. The WMA’s principal ethics activity over the years has been policy development on a wide variety of issues in medical research, medical practice and health care delivery. With the establishment of a dedicated Ethics Unit in 2003, the WMA’s ethics activities have intensified in the areas of liaison, outreach and product development. Initial priorities for the Ethics Unit have been the review (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Scott Wisor (2012). The World Development Report 2012: A Review. [REVIEW] Crop Poverty Brief.score: 62.0
    -/- The World Development Report 2012 "Gender Equality and Development" (GED), represents a new push to raise the profile of gender equality among a variety of official development actors. In this new CROP Poverty Brief Scott Wisor situates GED in the broader development context, discusses its key findings and some shortcomings and suggests how it should be used by advocates and allies concerned with eliminating gross gender injustice and global poverty.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Thaddeus Metz (2012). ’Giving the World a More Human Face’: Human Suffering in African Thought and Philosophy. In Jeff Malpas & Norelle Lickiss (eds.), Perspectives on Human Suffering. Springer. 49-62.score: 61.0
    I present ideas about human suffering that are salient among the black peoples of sub-Saharan Africa, reconstruct them in order to make them relevant to an international audience with philosophical interests, and urge that audience to give them consideration as alternatives or correctives to some dominant Western approaches. I first recount views commonly held by sub-Saharans about the nature, causes and cures of suffering, and then draw on them to articulate an account of it qua enervation, which rivals a neuro-physical (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Anthony L. Brueckner (1994). Knowledge of Content and Knowledge of the World. Philosophical Review 103 (2):327-343.score: 60.0
    In "Externalism, Self-Knowledge and Skepticism,"' Kevin Falvey and Joseph Owens argue that externalism with respect to mental content does not engender skepticism about knowledge of content. They go on to argue that even when externalism is freed from epistemological difficulties, the thesis cannot be used against Cartesian skepticism about knowledge of the external world. I would like to raise some questions about these claims.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Hauke Brunkhorst (2009). Dialectical Snares: Human Rights and Democracy in the World Society. Ethics and Global Politics 2 (3).score: 60.0
    The paper starts with a thesis on the dialectical structure of modern law that goes back the European revolutionary tradition and constitutes a legal structure that is at once emancipatory and repressive. Once it became democratic the modern nation states has solved more or less successfully the crises that emerged in modern Europe since the 16th Century. Yet, this state did not escape the dialectical snares of modern law and modern legal regimes. It’s greatest advance, the exclusion of inequalities presupposed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Alec Gordon (2008). The Philosophical Poetics of Counter-World, Anti-World, and Ideal World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:87-92.score: 60.0
    What might the project be of lyric poetry in late global capitalism in the early years of the new millennium which acknowledges both a post-romantic and modernist lineage, and which faces the critical challenge of postmodernist theorizing? This paper endeavors to respond to this question forwarding the Adorno-inspired viewpoint that the praxes of individual lyric poems reveal orientations of affirmation or negation be they intended or not. The thesis is stated that the “arguments” of modern poets are creative litigations posing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jennifer Gosetti-Ferencei (2012). The World and Image of Poetic Language: Heidegger and Blanchot. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):189-212.score: 60.0
    This essay engages ways in which the manifestation of ‘world’ occurs in poetry specifically through images, and how we can conceive of the imagination in this regard without reducing the imagination to a mimetic faculty of consciousness subordinate to cognition. Continental thought in the last century offers rich resources for this study. The notion of a ‘world’ is related to the poetic image in ways fundamental to the Heidegger’s theory of language, and may be seen in Continental poetics following Heidegger, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2007). Cosmopolitan Community and the Law of World Citizenship. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:45-50.score: 60.0
    In this paper I argue that Kant's concept of cosmopolitan right is the philosophical basis for contemporary international human rights. The law of world citizenship or cosmopolitan right is necessary in order to secure hospitable interactions between individuals and states. Such interactions in turn create an international civil culture or "cosmopolitan condition" which 1 is the source of the further specification and eventual codification of human rights. Human rights, I conclude, are universal because of their international significance and scope and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Yuchao Xiao, Robert Faff, Philip Gharghori & Darren Lee (2013). An Empirical Study of the World Price of Sustainability. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):297-310.score: 60.0
    The core goal of this study is to empirically investigate whether there is a “world price” of corporate sustainability. This is assessed in the context of standard asset pricing models—in particular, by asking whether a risk premium attaches to a sustainability factor after controlling for the Fama–French factors. Both time-series and cross-sectional tests are formulated and applied. The results show that (1) global Fama–French factors have strong power to explain global equity returns and (2) sustainability investments have no significant impact (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Raymond Kolcaba (2000). Loss of the World: A Philosophical Dialogue (1). [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1):3-9.score: 60.0
    Humanity has begun to move from the natural world intothe cyber world. Issues surrounding this mentalmigration are debated in philosophical dialogue. Thelead character is Becket Geist, a romantic philosopherwith views tempered by 20th century science. He openswith a monologue in which he argues that loss of theworld in exchange for the cyber world is dark andinevitable. His chief adversary is Fortran McCyborg,a cyborg with leanings toward Scottish philosophy. The moderating force is Nonette Naturski who championsnaturalism, conservation of humanist (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Arilson Silva Oliveira (2009). Desvendando a religião e as religiões mundiais em Max Weber (Revealing religion and the world religions in Max Weber) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2009v7n14p136. [REVIEW] Horizonte 7 (14):136-155.score: 60.0
    Apresentamos Max Weber como um dos sociólogos e historiadores mais importantes dentre aqueles que se dedicaram ao estudo do fenômeno religioso. Na verdade, é possível afirmar que a análise da religião compreende um dos aspectos mais fundamentais de sua obra sócio-histórica. De modo geral, esse tema aparece em seus textos de duas maneiras diferentes, quais sejam: enquanto um objeto analisado em sua singularidade e enquanto uma manifestação social que influencia de maneira significativa os demais aspectos da vida comunitária. Aqui, observamos (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Christopher Gill, Tim Whitmarsh & John Wilkins (eds.) (2009). Galen and the World of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Christopher Gill, Tim Whitmarsh and John Wilkins: 1. Galen's library Vivian Nutton; 2. Conventions of prefatory self-presentation in Galen's On the Order of My Own Books Jason König; 3. Demiurge and emperor in Galen's world of knowledge Rebecca Flemming; 4. Shock and awe: the performance dimension of Galen's anatomy demonstrations Maud Gleason; 5. Galen's un-Hippocratic case-histories G. E. R. Lloyd; 6. Staging the past, staging oneself: Galen on Hellenistic exegetical traditions Heinrich von Staden; 7. Galen (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. J. O. Famakinwa (2008). Philosophy Relevance in the Contemporary World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 4:29-46.score: 60.0
    If philosophy is conceived as a method, seeing it beyond the traditional issues it addresses, issues that are not, strictly speaking, peculiar to it, then philosophy need not share the same criteria of relevance with science and technology. The paper argues that the generally held major criteria of relevance – utility, suitability, and social acceptability grounded on human desires and need are not philosophically satisfactory. The paper also argues that the Universalist conception of philosophy is, like science and technology, capable (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000