Search results for 'The physical world' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). How Can Our Human World Exist and Best Flourish Embedded in the Physical Universe? A Letter to an Applicant to a New Liberal Studies Course. On the Horizon 22 (1).score: 143.0
    In this paper I sketch a liberal studies course designed to explore our fundamental problem of thought and life: How can our human world exist and best flourish embedded as it is in the physical universe? The fundamental character of this problem provides one with the opportunity to explore a wide range of issues. What does physics tell us about the universe and ourselves? How do we account for everything physics leaves out? How can living brains be conscious? (...)
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  2. Nicholas Maxwell (2001). The Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will and Evolution. Lanham: Rowman &Amp; Littlefield.score: 140.0
    This book tackles the problem of how we can understand our human world embedded in the physical universe in such a way that justice is done both to the richness...
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  3. Ian J. Thompson (1988). Real Dispositions in the Physical World. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (1):67-79.score: 123.0
    The role of dispositions in the physical world is considered. It is shown that not only can classical physics be reasonably construed as the discovery of real dispositions, but also quantum physics. This approach moreover allows a realistic understanding of quantum processes.
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  4. Euan J. Squires (1993). Quantum Theory and the Relation Between the Conscious Mind and the Physical World. Synthese 97 (1):109-23.score: 120.0
    The measurement problem of quantum theory is discussed, and the difficulty of trying to solve it within the confines of a local, Lorentz-invariant physics is emphasised. This leads to the obvious suggestion to seek a solution beyond physics, in particular, by introducing the concept of consciousness. The resulting dualistic model, in the natural form suggested by quantum theory, is shown to differ in several respects from the classical model of Descartes, and to suggest solutions to some of the long-standing problems (...)
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  5. Max Velmans (1990). Consciousness, Brain, and the Physical World. Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):77-99.score: 120.0
    Dualist and Reductionist theories of mind disagree about whether or not consciousness can be reduced to a state of or function of the brain. They assume, however, that the contents of consciousness are separate from the external physical world as-perceived. According to the present paper this assumption has no foundation either in everyday experience or in science. Drawing on evidence for perceptual projection in both interoceptive and exteroceptive sense modalities, the case is made that the physical (...) as-perceived is a construct of perceptual processing and, therefore, part of the contents of consciousness. A finding which requires a Reflexive rather than a Dualist or Reductionist model of how consciousness relates to the brain and the physical world. The physical world as-perceived may, in turn be thought of as a biologically useful model of the world as described by physics. Redrawing the boundaries of consciousness to include the physical world as-perceived undermines the conventional separation of the 'mental' from the physical', and with it the very foundation of the Dualist-Reductionist debate. The alternative Reflexive model departs radically from current conventions, with consequences for many aspects of consciousness theory and research. Some of the consequences which bear on the internal consistency and intuitive plausibility of the model are explored, e.g. the causal sequence in perception, representationalism, a suggested resolution of the Realism versus Idealism debate, and the way manifest differences between physical events as-perceived and other conscious events (images, dreams, etc.) are to be construed. In the present paper I wish to challenge some of our most deeply-rooted assumptions about what consciousness is, by re-examining how consciousness, the human brain, and the surrounding physical world relate to each other. (shrink)
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  6. By Charles Goodman (2004). The Treasury of Metaphysics and the Physical World. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):389–401.score: 120.0
    Most modern analytic philosophers have ignored works of Indian philosophy such as Vasubandhu's 'Treasury of Metaphysics'. This neglect is unjustified. The account of the nature of the physical world given in the 'Treasury' is a one-category ontology of dharmas, which are simple, momentary tropes. They include basic physical tropes, the most fundamental level of the physical world, as well as higher-level tropes, including sensible properties such as colours, which are known as derived form. I argue (...)
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  7. Agustín Vicente (2001). El Principio Del Cierre Causal Del Mundo Físico (The Priniciple of the Causal Closure of the Physical World). Crítica 33 (99):3 - 17.score: 120.0
    Cabe argumentar en favor del fisicismo a partir de consideraciones metodológicas o epistémicas, o desde un punto de vista ontológico. En los últimos años se ha venido presentando un potente argumento ontológico que hace un uso esencial de lo que se ha dado en llamar el "principio del cierre causal del mundo físico". En este artículo examino si es posible que sea la propia física quien fundamente este principio. Propongo que, con la ayuda de las contemporáneas teorías reductivas de la (...)
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  8. Charles A. Anderson (2011). Philo of Alexandria's Views of the Physical World. Mohr Siebeck.score: 120.0
    The problem of Philo's ambivalence about the physical world -- The context for Philo's ambivalence toward the physical world -- Philo's negative terminology for the physical world : [ousia, hylē, genesis, genētos] -- Philo's positive terminology for the physical world : [kosmos] -- Philo's positive terminology for the physical world : [physis] part 1 -- Philo's positive terminology for the physical world : [physis] part 2 -- Higher and (...)
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  9. Rudolf Simek (1996). Heaven and Earth in the Middle Ages: The Physical World Before Columbus. Boydell Press.score: 120.0
    A discussion of European understanding of the physical world from the 9th century to the 15th, ranging from astronomy to zoology and refuting the more recent ...
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  10. Max Velmans (1992). Synopsis of 'Consciousness, Brain and the Physical World'. Philosophical Psychology 5 (2):153-157.score: 120.0
    (1992). Synopsis of ‘consciousness, brain and the physical world’. Philosophical Psychology: Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 153-157. doi: 10.1080/09515089208573049.
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  11. Charles Goodman (2004). The Treasury of Metaphysics and the Physical World. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):389 - 401.score: 120.0
    Most modern analytic philosophers have ignored works of Indian philosophy such as Vasubandhu's 'Treasury of Metaphysics'. This neglect is unjustified. The account of the nature of the physical world given in the 'Treasury' is a one-category ontology of dharmas, which are simple, momentary tropes. They include basic physical tropes, the most fundamental level of the physical world, as well as higher-level tropes, including sensible properties such as colours, which are known as derived form. I argue (...)
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  12. Rainer Mausfeld & Dieter Heyer (eds.) (2003). Colour Perception: Mind and the Physical World. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    Colour has long been a source of fascination to both scientists and philosophers. In one sense, colours are in the mind of the beholder, in another sense they belong to the external world. Colours appear to lie on the boundary where we have divided the world into 'objective' and 'subjective' events. They represent, more than any other attribute of our visual experience, a place where both physical and mental properties are interwoven in an intimate and enigmatic way. (...)
     
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  13. Abraham Pais (1986). Inward Bound: Of Matter and Forces in the Physical World. Oxford University Press.score: 119.7
    Abraham Pais's Subtle Is the Lord was a publishing phenomenon: a mathematically sophisticated exposition of the science and the life of Albert Einstein that reached a huge audience and won an American Book Award. Reviewers hailed the book as "a monument to sound scholarship and graceful style" (The New York Times Book Review), "an extraordinary biography of an extraordinary man" (Christian Science Monitor), and "a fine book" (Scientific American). In this groundbreaking new volume, Pais undertakes a history of the physics (...)
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  14. Christian de Quincey (2008). Reality Bubbles:Can We Know Anything About the Physical World? Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (8):94-101.score: 119.0
    From Plato's eidos, to Descartes' cogito, to Kant's numenon, our understanding of reality has faltered at a seemingly impossible, double-edged, impasse. First, an ontological 'hard problem': If mind and matter are so radically different and separate, how do they ever interact? Second, a related epistemological conundrum: How is it possible for mind to ever know anything about matter--including whether it even exists? Then came Whitehead. By shifting the mind-matter relation from substances interacting in space to complementary phases in process, he (...)
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  15. Walter Horn (1984). A New Proof for the Physical World. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (4):531-537.score: 119.0
    A proof is offered according to which if a psychological premise held by many diverse philosophers through the centuries to the effect that any represented physical property will be held to be exemplified unless some conflicting physical property is simultaneously represented is considered to be necessary, then there are physical objects in every possible world.
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  16. Emmett L. Holman (1981). Intension, Identity, and the Colourless Physical World: A Revision and Further Discussion. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 59 (2):203 – 205.score: 116.0
    (1981). Intension, identity, and the Colourless Physical World: A revision and further discussion. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 59, No. 2, pp. 203-205.
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  17. Ken Gemes (1987). The World in Itself: Neither Uniform nor Physical. Synthese 73 (2):301 - 318.score: 108.0
    Since Hume, philosophers of induction have debated the question of whether we have any reason for assuming that nature is uniform. This debate has always presumed that the uniformity hypothesis is itself coherent. In Part 1 of the following I argue that a proper appreciation of Nelson Goodman's so-called grue-green problem1 should lead us to the conclusion that the uniformity hypothesis, under its usual interpretation as a strictly ontological thesis, is incoherent. In Part 2 I argue that further consideration of (...)
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  18. Susan G. Sterrett (2002). Physical Models and Fundamental Laws: Using One Piece of the World to Tell About Another. [REVIEW] Mind and Society 3 (1):51-66.score: 108.0
    In this paper I discuss the relationship between model, theories, and laws in the practice of experimental scale modeling. The methodology of experimental scale modeling, also known as physical similarity, differs markedly from that of other kinds of models in ways that are important to issues in philosophy of science. Scale models are not discussed in much depth in mainstream philosophy of science. In this paper, I examine how scale models are used in making inferences. The main question I (...)
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  19. Robert A. Mechikoff (2006). A History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 105.0
    This engaging and informative text will hold the attention of students and scholars as they take a journey through time to understand the role that history and philosophy have played in shaping the course of sport and physical education in Western and selected non-Western civilizations. Using appropriate theoretical and interpretive frameworks, students will investigate topics such as the historical relationship between mind and body; what philosophers and intellectuals have said about the body as a source of knowledge; educational philosophy (...)
     
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  20. Peter W. Ross (2010). Fitting Color Into the Physical World. Philosophical Psychology 23 (5):575-599.score: 102.0
    I propose a strategy for a metaphysical reduction of perceived color, that is, an identification of perceived color with properties characterizable in non-qualitative terms. According to this strategy, a description of visual experience of color, which incorporates a description of the appearance of color, is a reference-fixing description. This strategy both takes color appearance seriously in its primary epistemic role and avoids rendering color as metaphysically mysterious. I’ll also argue that given this strategy, a plausible account of perceived color claims (...)
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  21. Robert G. Jahn & Brenda J. Dunne (1987). Margins of Reality: The Role of Consciousness in the Physical World. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.score: 102.0
    The scientific, personal, and social implications of this revolutionary work are staggering. MARGINS OF REALITY is nothing less than a fundamental reevaluation of how the world really works.
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  22. Natika Newton (2003). A Critical Review of Nicholas Maxwell's the Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will, and Evolution. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):149 – 156.score: 101.0
    Nicholas Maxwell takes on the ambitious project of explaining, both epistemologically and metaphysically, the physical universe and human existence within it. His vision is appealing; he unites the physical and the personal by means of the concepts of aim and value, which he sees as the keys to explaining traditional physical puzzles. Given the current popularity of theories of goal-oriented dynamical systems in biology and cognitive science, this approach is timely. But a large vision requires firm and (...)
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  23. Lydia Patton (2010). Review of Hyder, The Determinate World: Kant and Helmholtz on the Physical Meaning of Geometry. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).score: 99.0
    Hyder constructs two historical narratives. First, he gives an account of Helmholtz's relation to Kant, from the famous Raumproblem, which preoccupied philosophers, geometers, and scientists in the mid-19th century, to Helmholtz's arguments in his four papers on geometry from 1868 to 1878 that geometry is, in some sense, an empirical science (chapters 5 and 6). The second theme is the argument for the necessity of central forces to a determinate scientific description of physical reality, an abiding concern of Helmholtz's, (...)
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  24. F. Rohrlich (1987). From Paradox to Reality: Our New Concepts of the Physical World. Cambridge University Press.score: 98.0
    Using a clear, non-technical style, Professor Rohrlich discusses the two major theories of twentieth-century physics: relativity and quantum mechanics. Discussed conceptually and philosophically, rather than using mathematics, the philosophical issues raised show how new discoveries forced physicists to accept often strange and unconventional notions. He aims to remove the mystery and misrepresentation that often surround the ideas of modern physics and to show how modern scientists construct theories, so that the reader can appreciate their successes and failures and understand problems (...)
     
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  25. Noa Latham (1998). Chalmers on the Addition of Consciousness to the Physical World. Philosophical Studies 98 (1):71-97.score: 96.0
  26. Emmett L. Holman (1979). Is the Physical World Colourless? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57 (December):295-304.score: 96.0
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  27. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1955). The Nature of the Physical World. London, Dent.score: 95.0
    1929. The course of Gifford Lectures that Eddington delivered in the University of Edinburgh in January to March 1927.
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  28. Euan J. Squires (1990). Conscious Mind in the Physical World. Adam Hilger.score: 94.0
    The book explores philosophical issues such as idealism and free will and speculates on the relationship of consciousness to quantum mechanics.
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  29. B. D. Josephson & V. S. Ramachandran (eds.) (1980). Consciousness and the Physical World: Edited Proceedings of an Interdisciplinary Symposium on Consciousness Held at the University of Cambridge in January 1978. Pergamon Press.score: 93.0
    Edited proceedings of an interdisciplinary symposium on consciousness held at the University of Cambridge in January 1978. Includes a foreword by Freeman Dyson. Chapter authors: G. Vesey, R.L. Gregory, H.C. Longuet-Higgins, N.K. Humphrey, H.B. Barlow, D.M. MacKay, B.D. Josephson, M. Roth, V.S. Ramachandran, S. Padfield, and (editorial summary only) E. Noakes. -/- Page numbering convention: 'go to page n' accesses the pair of scanned pages 2n and 2n+1. A text-format version of the book (OCR generated with occasional errors) is available (...)
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  30. Barry Stroud (1986). The Physical World. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 87:263 - 277.score: 93.0
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  31. R. L. Howland (1963). Aristotle's Physical Theories Priedrigh Solmsen: Aristotle's System of the Physical World.(Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, Xxxiii.) Pp. Ix+468. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1960. Cloth, 60s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 13 (01):39-42.score: 93.0
  32. G. S. Kirk (1958). The Physical World of the Greeks S. Sambursky: The Physical World of the Greeks. Translated From the Hebrew by Merton Dagut. Pp. X+255. London: Routledge, 1956. Cloth, 25s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 8 (02):111-116.score: 93.0
  33. C. L. Hardin (2008). 7 Color Qualities and the Physical World. In Edmond Wright (ed.), The Case for Qualia. The Mit Press. 143.score: 93.0
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  34. Heiko Hecht (2001). Regularities of the Physical World and the Absence of Their Internalization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):608-617.score: 93.0
    The notion of internalization put forth by Roger Shepard continues to be appealing and challenging. He suggests that we have internalized, during our evolutionary development, environmental regularities, or constraints. Internalization solves one of the hardest problems of perceptual psychology: the underspecification problem. That is the problem of how well-defined perceptual experience is generated from the often ambiguous and incomplete sensory stimulation. Yet, the notion of internalization creates new problems that may outweigh the solution of the underspecification problem. To support this (...)
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  35. Lee C. Rice (1972). "In Contact with the Physical World," by John Pennycuick. The Modern Schoolman 50 (1):107-111.score: 93.0
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  36. J. Delboeuf (1894). Are the Dimensions of the Physical World Absolute? The Monist 4 (2):248-260.score: 93.0
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  37. J. Delbœuf (1894). Are the Dimensions of the Physical World Absolute? Space, Geometric and Actual. The Monist 4 (2):248 - 260.score: 93.0
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  38. B. Farrington (1963). From Aristotle to Philoponus S. Sambursky: The Physical World of Late Antiquity. Pp. Xii + 190. London: Routledge, 1962. Cloth, 21s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 13 (02):195-196.score: 93.0
  39. John Foster (1992). The Construction of the Physical World. In L. E. Hahn (ed.), The Philosophy of A J Ayer. Open Court.score: 93.0
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  40. William S. Haymond (1963). Perception and the Physical World. The Modern Schoolman 40 (4):401-403.score: 93.0
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  41. Antony Orme (1985). Understanding and Predicting the Physical World. In R. J. Johnston (ed.), The Future of Geography. Methuen. 258--275.score: 93.0
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  42. G. Toraldo di Francia (1981). The Investigation of the Physical World. Cambridge University Press.score: 92.0
  43. David Allen Park (1981). The Image of Eternity: Roots of Time in the Physical World. New American Library.score: 92.0
     
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  44. Richard Schlegel (1961/1968). Time and the Physical World. New York, Dover Publications.score: 92.0
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  45. Guy K. White (ed.) (1980). Changing Views of the Physical World, 1954-1979. Australian Academy of Science.score: 92.0
  46. H. R. Brown (1994). Conscious Mind in the Physical World. Foundations of Physics 24:807-807.score: 91.0
     
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  47. John A. Jungerman (2004). Evidence for Process in the Physical World. In T. E. Eastman & H. Keeton (eds.), Physics and Whitehead: Quantum, Process, and Experience. Suny Press. 47.score: 91.0
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  48. Jaegwon Kim (2000). Mind in a Physical World: An Essay on the Mind-Body Problem and Mental Causation. MIT Press.score: 90.0
    This book, based on Jaegwon Kim's 1996 Townsend Lectures, presents the philosopher's current views on a variety of issues in the metaphysics of the mind...
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  49. Hugh S. Chandler, Putnam on Realism.score: 90.0
    In 1974 Putnam was a ‘realist’ in regard to the physical world. By 1981 he had become a 'non-realist' in this regard. (I don’t know where he stands today.) In this paper I argue that his realism was more plausible than his non-realism. The physical world is what it is independently of any rational being’s interpretation of it.
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  50. Douglas M. Stokes, Consciousness and the Physical World.score: 90.0
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