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Profile: Theodore Schatzki (University of Kentucky)
  1. Theodore R. Schatzki, K. Knorr-Cetina & Eike von Savigny (eds.) (2001). The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. Routledge.
    The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory is the first book to provide an exciting and diverse philosophical exploration of the role of practice and practices in human activity. It also shows how practice theory stands in opposition to numerous prevalent ways of thinking, such as structuralism, system theory, semiotics, and many strains of humanism.
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  2. Theodore R. Schatzki (2002). The Site of the Social: A Philosophical Account of the Constitution of Social Life and Change. Penn State University Press.
    Inspired by Heidegger’s concept of the clearing of being, and by Wittgenstein’s ideas on human practice, Theodore Schatzki offers a novel approach to understanding the constitution and transformation of social life. Key to the account he develops here is the context in which social life unfolds—the "site of the social"—as a contingent and constantly metamorphosing mesh of practices and material orders. Schatzki’s analysis reveals the advantages of this site ontology over the traditional individualist, holistic, and structuralist accounts that have dominated (...)
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  3. Theodore R. Schatzki (1996). Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses key topics in social theory such as the basic structures of social life, the character of human activity, and the nature of individuality. Drawing on the work of Wittgenstein, the author develops an account of social existence that argues that social practices are the fundamental phenomenon in social life. This approach offers new insight into the social formation of individuals, surpassing and critiquing the existing practice theories of Bourdieu, Giddens, Lyotard, and Oakeshott. In bringing Wittgenstein's work to (...)
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  4. Theodore R. Schatzki (1997). Practices and Actions a Wittgensteinian Critique of Bourdieu and Giddens. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (3):283-308.
    This article criticizes Bourdieu's and Giddens's overintellectualizing accounts of human activity on the basis of Wittgenstein's insights into practical under standing. Part 1 describes these two theorists' conceptions of a homology between the organization of practices (spatial-temporal manifolds of action) and the governance of individual actions. Part 2 draws on Wittgenstein's discussions of linguistic definition and following a rule to criticize these conceptions for ascribing content to the practical understanding they claim governs action. Part 3 then suggests an alternative, Wittgensteinian (...)
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  5.  96
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2003). A New Societist Social Ontology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (2):174-202.
    This article delineates a new type of social ontology—site ontology—and defends a particular version of that type. The first section establishes the distinctiveness of site ontologies over both individualist ontologies and previous societist ones. The second section then shows how site ontologies elude two pervasive criticisms, that of incompleteness directed at individualism and that of reification leveled at societism. The third section defends a particular site ontology, one that depicts the social as a mesh of human practices and material arrangements. (...)
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  6.  41
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2010). The Timespace of Human Activity: On Performance, Society, and History as Indeterminate Teleological Events. Lexington Books.
    The Timespace of Human Activity shows that a concept of activity timespace drawn from the work of Martin Heidegger Provides new insights into the nature of ...
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  7.  91
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2006). The Time of Activity. Continental Philosophy Review 39 (2):155-182.
    This essay analyzes the time of human activity. It begins by discussing how most accounts of action treat the time of action as succession, using Donald Davidson's account of action as illustration. It then argues that an adequate account of action and its determinants, one able to elucidate the ``indeterminacy of action,'' requires an alternative conception of action time. The remainder of the essay constructs a propitious account of the time and determination of action. It does so by critically drawing (...)
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  8.  58
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2011). Pippin's Hegel on Action. Inquiry 53 (5):490-505.
    This essay is a commentary on and critique of the conception of human activity that Robert Pippin attributes to Hegel in his recent book, Hegel's Practical Philosophy. Two principal features of this conception are that it treats human activity as indeterminate and that it construes what someone does and why on a given occasion as depending on social contexts. Pippin suggests that these two features will sound strange to contemporary philosophers. The essay claims, by contrast, that these features will not (...)
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  9.  48
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2003). Living Out of the Past: Dilthey and Heidegger on Life and History. Inquiry 46 (3):301 – 323.
    This essay examines continuities and transformations in Heidegger's appropriation of Dilthey's account of life and the accompanying picture of history between the end of World War One and Being and Time . The essay also judges the cogency of two conclusions that Heidegger draws in that book about history, viz, that historicity qua feature of Dasein's being both underlies objective history and makes the scholarly narration of history possible. Part one describes Dilthey's account of life, Heidegger's criticism that this account (...)
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  10.  56
    Theodore Richard Schatzki (1987). Overdue Analysis of Bourdieu's Theory of Practice. Inquiry 30 (1 & 2):113 – 135.
    Pierre Bourdieu's theory of practice is an unsung classic of contemporary social philosophy. It combines the first analysis by a social theorist of the practical intelligibility governing action with an exciting perspective on how the structure of social phenomena determines and is itself perpetuated by action. Bourdieu, however, misinterprets his own theory of intelligibility as a theory of the causal generation of action. Moreover, he attempts to analyze the underlying structure of intelligibility with a set of fundamental oppositions that at (...)
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  11.  46
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1993). Wittgenstein + Heidegger on the Stream of Life. Inquiry 36 (3):307 – 328.
    This paper combines views of Wittgenstein and Heidegger into an account of mind/ action. It does this by suggesting that these two philosophers be viewed in part as descendants of Life?philosophy (Lebensphilosophie). Part I describes the conception of life that informs and emerges from these thinkers. Parts Two and Three detail particular aspects of this conception: Wittgenstein on the constitution of states of life and Heidegger on the flow?structure of the stream of life. The Conclusion offers reasons for believing their (...)
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  12.  47
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1993). Wittgenstein: Mind, Body, and Society. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 23 (3):285–313.
  13.  27
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2003). Human Universals and Understanding a Different Socioculture. Human Studies 26 (1):11-20.
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  14.  37
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2000). The Social Bearing of Nature. Inquiry 43 (1):21 – 37.
    This essay examines how nature pertains to social life. Part I describes the social ontology the essay employs to address this issue. This ontology is of the site variety and is opposed to ontologies of both the individualist and socialist sorts. Part II describes where nature appears in this ontology. Artifacts are differentiated from nature, and much of ?nature? is shown to be second nature, a type of artifact that looks and feels like nature. Part II concludes by disputing the (...)
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  15.  33
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2001). On Sociocultural Evolution by Social Selection. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 31 (4):341–364.
    The essay criticizes an alleged new paradigm for explaining sociocultural change: selectionism. Part one describes the general selectionist explanatory schema, which selectionists claim applies to realms beyond the biological, in particular, the sociocultural. Part two focuses on the way most selectionists, in focusing on cultural change alone, wrongly separate culture from society. Particular atten-tion is paid to the accounts these selectionists offer of human action. Part three fills out a conception of the sociocultural, the need for which is indicated by (...)
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  16.  32
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1991). Elements of a Wittgensteinian Philosophy of the Human Sciences. Synthese 87 (2):311 - 329.
    In this paper, a Wittgensteinian account of the human sciences is constructed around the notions of the surface of human life and of surface phenomena as expressions. I begin by explaining Wittgenstein's idea that the goal of interpretive social science is to make actions and practices seem natural. I then explicate his notions of the surface of life and of surface phenomena as expressions by reviewing his analysis of mental state language. Finally, I critically examine three ideas: (a) that the (...)
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  17.  34
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1988). The Nature of Social Reality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (2):239-260.
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  18.  26
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1986). The Rationalization of Meaning and Understanding: Davidson and Habermas. Synthese 69 (1):51 - 79.
  19.  14
    Theodore R. Schatzki (forthcoming). Mind/Action for Wittgenstein and Heidegger. Southwest Philosophy Review.
    The paper outlines how Wittgenstein and Heidegger's views can be combined to form a general account of mind and action. It accomplishes this by interpreting Heidegger of the "Being and Time" era and Wittgenstein of the "Philosophical Investigations" onwards asdescendents of the School of Thought called life philosophy. Heidegger is construed as analyzing the occurrence of The Stream of Life, while Wittgenstein is understood as examining (a) The appearances of The Stream in The World and (b) The linguistic articulation tracking (...)
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  20. Theodore R. Schatzki (2001). Practice Mind-Ed Orders. In Theodore R. Schatzki, K. Knorr-Cetina & Eike von Savigny (eds.), The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. Routledge 42--55.
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  21. Theodore R. Schatzki (2007). Martin Heidegger: Theorist of Space. Steiner.
  22.  33
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2000). Simulation Theory and the Verstehen School: A Wittgensteinian Approach. In K. R. Stueber & H. H. Kogaler (eds.), Empathy and Agency: The Problem of Understanding in the Human Sciences. Boulder: Westview Press
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  23.  31
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2003). Nature and Technology in History. History and Theory 42 (4):82–93.
    This essay sketches an expanded theoretical conception of the roles of nature and technology in history, one that is based on a social ontology that does not separate nature and society. History has long been viewed as the realm of past human action. On this conception, nature is treated largely as an Other of history, and technology is construed chiefly as a means for human fulfillment. There is no history of nature, and the history of technology becomes the history of (...)
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  24. Theodore R. Schatzki & Wolfgang Natter (1996). The Social and Political Body.
     
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  25.  18
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1990). Do Social Structures Govern Action? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):280-295.
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  26.  22
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1985). Subjects, Intelligibility, and History. Inquiry 28 (1-4):273-287.
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  27.  18
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2005). The Temporality of Teleology. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 5:123-143.
  28.  6
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2000). Wittgenstein and the Social Context of an Individual Life. History of the Human Sciences 13 (1):93-107.
    This article argues that two significant implications of Wittgenstein’s writings for social thought are (1) that people are constitutively social beings and (2) that the social context of an individual life is nexuses of practice. Part one concretizes these ideas by examining the constitution of action within practices. It begins by criticizing three arguments of Winch’s that suggest that action is inherently social. It then spells out two arguments for the practice constitution of action that are extractable from Wittgenstein’s remarks. (...)
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  29.  16
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1988). Social Causality. Inquiry 31 (2):151 – 170.
    This paper combines a phenomenological account of the types of causal transaction found in social reality with a critique of two theories, one structuralist and one Marxist, that contravene it. Part I argues that there are three types of causal transaction in social life in addition to physical causal transactions: people bringing about states of affairs by acting, states of affairs bringing about actions by inducing responses, and entities and states of affairs bringing about what makes sense to people to (...)
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  30.  9
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1990). Heidegger and the Philosophy of Mind. Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (3):466-468.
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  31.  4
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2005). The Temporality of Teleology: Against the Narrativity of Action. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 5:123-143.
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  32. John Paul Jones, Wolfgang Natter & Theodore R. Schatzki (1993). Postmodern Contentions Epochs, Politics, Space. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  33. Theodore R. Schatzki (1989). Early Heidegger on Being, the Clearing, and Realism in Heidegger (1889-1989). Revue Internationale de Philosophie 43 (168):80-102.
     
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  34.  8
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1994). Aerobics as Political Model and Schooling. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (2):29-43.
    Among the theses promulgated by the Frankfort School theorists during the forties and fifties was the decline of the individual under contemporary capitalism. The chief agent of this decline was identified as the culture industry, which served the reigning system by integrating people into its particular regime of production, reproduction, and consumption. By dominating minds, homogenizing behaviors, and normalizing tastes, this industry prepared people for capitalist toil. In so doing, it also obstructed the flowering of individuality. Individuality, if it were (...)
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  35. Theodore R. Schatzki (2003). Raimo Tuomela, The Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (6):409-411.
     
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  36.  1
    Theodore R. Schatzki (1991). Nietzsche's wesensethik. Nietzsche-Studien 20 (1):68.
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  37.  7
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2006). Review of Stephen H. Daniel (Ed.), Current Continental Theory and Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (8).
  38.  2
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2011). 4 Landscapes as Temporalspatial Phenomena. In Jeff Malpas (ed.), The Place of Landscape: Concepts, Contexts, Studies. MIT Press 65.
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  39. Karin Knorr Cetina, Theodore R. Schatzki & Eike von Savigny (eds.) (2005). The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. Routledge.
    This book provides an exciting and diverse philosophical exploration of the role of practice and practices in human activity. It contains original essays and critiques of this philosophical and sociological attempt to move beyond current problematic ways of thinking in the humanities and social sciences. It will be useful across many disciplines, including philosophy, sociology, science, cultural theory, history and anthropology.
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  40. Karin Knorr Cetina, Theodore R. Schatzki & Eike von Savigny (eds.) (2001). The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. Routledge.
    This book provides an exciting and diverse philosophical exploration of the role of practice and practices in human activity. It contains original essays and critiques of this philosophical and sociological attempt to move beyond current problematic ways of thinking in the humanities and social sciences. It will be useful across many disciplines, including philosophy, sociology, science, cultural theory, history and anthropology.
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  41. Theodore R. Schatzki (1994). Ancient and Naturalistic Themes in Nietzsche's Ethics. Nietzsche-Studien 23:146-167.
     
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  42. Theodore R. Schatzki (1989). Early Heidegger on Being, the Clearing, and Realism. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 43 (168):80.
     
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  43. Theodore R. Schatzki (1997). Hans Sluga and David G. Stern, Eds., The Cambridge Companion to Wittgenstein Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (4):291-293.
     
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  44. Theodore R. Schatzki (2009). Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses key topics in social theory such as the basic structures of social life, the character of human activity, and the nature of individuality. Drawing on the work of Wittgenstein, the author develops an account of social existence that argues that social practices are the fundamental phenomenon in social life. This approach offers insight into the social formation of individuals, surpassing and critiquing the existing practice theories of Bourdieu, Giddens, Lyotard and Oakeshott. In bringing Wittgenstein's work to bear (...)
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  45. Theodore R. Schatzki (2011). Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses key topics in social theory such as the basic structures of social life, the character of human activity, and the nature of individuality. Drawing on the work of Wittgenstein, the author develops an account of social existence that argues that social practices are the fundamental phenomenon in social life. This approach offers insight into the social formation of individuals, surpassing and critiquing the existing practice theories of Bourdieu, Giddens, Lyotard and Oakeshott. In bringing Wittgenstein's work to bear (...)
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  46. Theodore R. Schatzki (2008). Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses key topics in social theory such as the basic structures of social life, the character of human activity, and the nature of individuality. Drawing on the work of Wittgenstein, the author develops an account of social existence that argues that social practices are the fundamental phenomenon in social life. This approach offers insight into the social formation of individuals, surpassing and critiquing the existing practice theories of Bourdieu, Giddens, Lyotard and Oakeshott. In bringing Wittgenstein's work to bear (...)
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  47. Theodore Richard Schatzki (1986). Social Reality and Social Science. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    My dissertation traces the consequences following for social science from an analysis of the nature of its object domain, which I call "socio-historical reality." In particular, I hope thereby to dissolve many misconceptions about the character of social science. ;Influenced by Dilthey, I propose an "individualist" account that analyzes socio-historical reality as nothing but interrelated everyday lives, which themselves consist in series of actions that are governed by practical intelligibility and performed in interconnected settings. This analysis differs from traditional versions (...)
     
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  48. Theodore R. Schatzki (2002). Todd May, Our Practices, Our Selves. Or, What It Means to Be Human Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (5):340-342.
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  49. Theodore R. Schatzki (2003). The Site of the Social: A Philosophical Account of the Constitution of Social Life and Change. Penn State University Press.
    Inspired by Heidegger’s concept of the clearing of being, and by Wittgenstein’s ideas on human practice, Theodore Schatzki offers a novel approach to understanding the constitution and transformation of social life. Key to the account he develops here is the context in which social life unfolds—the "site of the social"—as a contingent and constantly metamorphosing mesh of practices and material orders. Schatzki’s analysis reveals the advantages of this site ontology over the traditional individualist, holistic, and structuralist accounts that have dominated (...)
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  50. Theodore R. Schatzki (2012). The Timespace of Human Activity: On Performance, Society, and History as Indeterminate Teleological Events. Lexington Books.
    This book develops an original Heideggerian account of the timespace and indeterminacy of human activity while describing insights that this account provides into the nature of activity, society and history. Drawing on empirical examples, the book argues that activity timespace is a key component of social space and time, shows that interwoven timespaces form an essential infrastructure of social phenomena, offers a novel account of the existence of the past in the present, and defends the teleological character of emotional and (...)
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