Search results for 'Theology Forecasting' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Avoidance of Natural Theology (2013). A Perspective on Natural Theology From Continental Philosophy. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up.score: 150.0
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  2. of Natural Theology (2013). Postmodernism and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up.score: 150.0
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  3. Somen Das (1996). Dharma of the Twenty-First Century: Theological-Ethical Paradigm Shift. Punthi Pustak.score: 66.0
     
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  4. Jacob Holsinger Sherman (2009). NO WEREWOLVES IN THEOLOGY?: TRANSCENDENCE, IMMANENCE, AND BECOMING-DIVINE IN GILLES DELEUZE. MODERN THEOLOGY 25 (1):1-20.score: 19.0
    This essay adds a theological voice to the current debate over the legacy of Gilles Deleuze. It discusses Peter Hallward's charge that Deleuze is best read as a mystical, theophanic philosopher who values creativity to the detriment of real creatures. It argues that while Hallward is right to discern a flight from bodies, relations, and politics in Deleuze, this is due not to Deleuze's contemplative mysticism, but rather to his strident rejection of any transcendence. The essay then draws upon Thomas (...)
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  5. Andrew Chignell (2009). 'As Kant Has Shown:' Analytic Theology and the Critical Philosophy. In M. Rea & O. Crisp (eds.), Analytic Theology. Oxford University Press. 116--135.score: 18.0
    On why Kant may not have shown what modern theologians often take him to have shown. -/- .
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  6. Leo Elders (1990). The Philosophical Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas. E.J. Brill.score: 18.0
    INTRODUCTION Philosophical theology is the systematic inquiry about God's existence and being. We find it in Aristotle's Metaphysics, in Cicero's De natura ...
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  7. Brian Leftow (2011). Why Perfect Being Theology? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):103-118.score: 18.0
    I display the historical roots of perfect being theology in Greco-Roman philosophy, and the distinctive reasons for Christians to take up a version of this project. I also rebut a recent argument that perfect-being reasoning should lead one to atheism.
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  8. Owen Anderson (2008). The Presuppositions of Religious Pluralism and the Need for Natural Theology. Sophia 47 (2):201-222.score: 18.0
    In ‘The Presuppositions of Religious Pluralism and the Need for Natural Theology’ I argue that there are four important presuppositions behind John Hick’s form of religious pluralism that successfully support it against what I call fideistic exclusivism. These are i) the ought/can principle, ii) the universality of religious experience, iii) the universality of redemptive change, and iv) a view of how God (the Eternal) would do things. I then argue that if these are more fully developed they support a (...)
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  9. Stephen T. Davis (2006). Christian Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Christian Philosophical Theology constitutes a Christian philosopher's look at various crucial topics in Christian theology, including belief in God, the nature of God, the Trinity, christology, the resurrection of Jesus, the general resurrection, redemption, and theological method. The book is tightly argued, and amounts to a coherent explanation of and case for the Christian world view. Although written from a broadly Reformed Protestant perspective, and although the author does not avoid controversial topics, his aim is to present a (...)
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  10. Robert Merrihew Adams (1987). The Virtue of Faith and Other Essays in Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Robert Merrihew Adams has been a leader in renewing philosophical respect for the idea that moral obligation may be founded on the commands of God. This collection of Adams' essays, two of which are previously unpublished, draws from his extensive writings on philosophical theology that discuss metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical issues surrounding the concept of God--whether God exists or not, what God is or would be like, and how we ought to relate ourselves to such a being. Adams studies (...)
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  11. Shane Duarte (2007). Aristotle's Theology and its Relation to the Science of Being Qua Being. Apeiron 40 (3):267-318.score: 18.0
    The paper proposes a novel understanding of how Aristotle’s theoretical works complement each other in such a way as to form a genuine system, and this with the immediate (and ostensibly central) aim of addressing a longstanding question regarding Aristotle’s ‘first philosophy’—namely, is Aristotle’s first philosophy a contribution to theology, or to the science of being in general? Aristotle himself seems to suggest that it is in some ways both, but how this can be is a very difficult question. (...)
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  12. Celina Maria Bragagnolo (2011). Secularization, History, and Political Theology: The Hans Blumenberg and Carl Schmitt Debate. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):84-104.score: 18.0
    Considering the enormous outpouring of scholarly work on Schmitt over the last two decades, the absence of an adequate treatment in English of Schmitt's concept of history and the problem of secularization is quite surprising. After all, it is Schmitt himself who claims that “all human beings who plan and attempt to unite the masses behind their plans engage in some form of philosophy of history,” such that the attempt to make sense of Schmitt's program remains incomplete without a serious (...)
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  13. William Franke (2006). Apophasis and the Turn of Philosophy to Religion: From Neoplatonic Negative Theology to Postmodern Negation of Theology. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):61 - 76.score: 18.0
    This essay represents part of an effort to rewrite the history metaphysics in terms of what philosophy never said, nor could say. It works from the Neoplatonic commentary tradition on Plato's Parmenides as the matrix for a distinctively apophatic thinking that takes the truth of metaphysical doctrines as something other than anything that can be logically articulated. It focuses on Damascius in the 5—6th century AD as the culmination of this tradition in the ancient world and emphasizes that Neoplatonism represents (...)
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  14. Edward Wierenga (2011). Augustinian Perfect Being Theology and the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):139-151.score: 18.0
    All of the ingredients for what has become known as Anselmian perfect being theology were present already in the thought of St. Augustine. This paper develops that thesis by calling attention to various claims Augustine makes. It then asks whether there are principled reasons for determining which properties the greatest possible being has and whether an account of what contributes to greatness can settle the question whether the greatest possible being is the same as the God of Abraham, Isaac, (...)
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  15. Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.) (2009). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology attempts both to familiarize readers with the directions in which this scholarship has gone and to pursue the ...
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  16. Conor Cunningham (2002). Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Nihilism is the logic of nothing as something, which claims that Nothing Is. Its unmaking of things, and its forming of formless things, strain the fundamental terms of existence: what it is to be, to know, to be known. But nihilism, the antithesis of God, is also like theology. Where nihilism creates nothingness, condenses it to substance, God also makes nothingness creative. Negotiating the borders of spirit and substance, theology can ask the questions of nihilism that other disciplines (...)
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  17. John Milbank, Catherine Pickstock & Graham Ward (eds.) (1999). Radical Orthodoxy: A New Theology. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Radical Orthodoxy is a new wave of theological thinking that seeks to re-inject the modern world with theology. The group of theologians associated with Radical Orthodoxy are dissatisfied with conteporary theolgical responses to both modernity and postmodernity Radical Orthodoxy is a collection that aims to reclaim the world by situating its concerns and activities within a theological framework. By mapping the new theology against a range of areas where modernity has failed, these essays offer us way out of (...)
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  18. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2011). Gedankenexperimente in der Offenbarungstheologie? Eine Erste Annäherung/ Thought Experiments in Revealed Theology? A First Approach. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 59 (1):209-229.score: 18.0
    Thought experiments play an important cognitive role in many fields of inquiry, especially in physics and philosophy. Do they also matter in revealed theology? In addressing this question, I will argue first why it is important to do so, then elaborate on the characteristic features of such thought experiments in revealed theology, and finally discuss two instances of thought experimenting in Augustine.
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  19. Arthur Bradley (2004). Negative Theology and Modern French Philosophy. Routledge.score: 18.0
    This book explores contemporary French philosophical readings of negative theology. It is the first general and comparative treatment of the role of negative theology in contemporary French thought.
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  20. Lloyd P. Gerson (1990/1994). God and Greek Philosophy: Studies in the Early History of Natural Theology. Routledge.score: 18.0
    THE PRE-SOCRATIC ORIGINS OF NATURAL THEOLOGY § INTRODUCTION St Augustine informs us that pagan philosophers divided theology into three parts: () civic ...
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  21. David Grumett (2005). Teilhard De Chardin: Theology, Humanity, and Cosmos. Peeters.score: 18.0
    "Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955) has been regarded for too long as an isoteric thinker who evacuates theology by subjecting it to scientific theory.
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  22. Matheson Russell (2011). Phenomenology and Theology: Situating Heidegger's Philosophy of Religion. Sophia 50 (4):641-655.score: 18.0
    This essay considers the philosophical and theological significance of the phenomenological analysis of Christian faith offered by the early Heidegger. It shows, first, that Heidegger poses a radical and controversial challenge to philosophers by calling them to do without God in an unfettered pursuit of the question of being (through his ‘destruction of onto-theology’); and, second, that this exclusion nonetheless leaves room for a form of philosophical reflection upon the nature of faith and discourse concerning God, namely for a (...)
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  23. Robert S. Corrington (2000). A Semiotic Theory of Theology and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    The concern of this work is with developing an alternative to standard categories in theology and philosophy, especially in terms of how they deal with nature. Avoiding the polemics of much contemporary reflection on nature, it shows how we are connected to nature through the unconscious and its unique way of reading and processing signs. Spinoza's key distinction between natura naturans and natura naturata serves as the governing framework for the treatise. Suggestions are made for a post-Christian way of (...)
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  24. Steven Matthews (2008). Theology and Science in the Thought of Francis Bacon. Ashgate Pub..score: 18.0
    Breaking with a Puritan past -- A mother's concern -- Turmoil and diversity in the English Reformation -- The influences and the options available in English -- Reformation theology -- Intellectual trends : patristics and hebrew -- Millennialism and the belief in a providential age -- Bacon's break with the godly -- Bacon's turn toward the ancient faith -- The formative years -- Bacon and Andrewes -- The Meditationes sacrae and Bacon's turn away from calvinism -- Bacon's confession of (...)
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  25. Nigel Biggar (2009). Saving the "Secular": The Public Vocation of Moral Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):159-178.score: 18.0
    The London suicide bombings of July 7, 2005 were partly the revolt of moral earnestness against a liberal society that, enchanted by the fantasy of rationalist anthropology, surrenders its passionate members to a degrading consumerism. The "humane" liberalism variously espoused by Jürgen Habermas, John Rawls, and Jeffrey Stout offers a dignifying alternative; but it is fragile, and each of its proponents looks for allies among certain kinds of religious believer. Stanley Hauerwas, however, counsels Christians against cooperation. On the one hand, (...)
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  26. Robert C. Miner (2004). Truth in the Making: Creative Knowledge in Theology and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Truth in the Making represents a sophisticated effort to map the complex relations between human knowledge and creative power, as reflected across more than half a millennium of philosophical enquiry. Showing the intimacy of this problematic to the work of Nicholas of Cusa, Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Hobbes, Leibniz, Vico and David Lachterman, the book reveals how questions about creation apparently diluted by secularism in fact retain much of their potency today. If science could counterfeit or synthesize nature precisely from its (...)
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  27. Dietrich Korsch & Amber Griffioen (eds.) (2011). Interpreting Religion: The Impact of Friedrich Schleiermacher’s "Reden Über Die Religion" for Religious Studies and Theology. Mohr Siebeck.score: 18.0
    The term religion is indispensable to the subject matter of both religious studies and theology. Many approaches attempt a reductive, essentialist, functionalist, or other type of unifying definition, but these approaches tend to rest on various, often controversial sets of presuppositions. Indeed, it seems impossible to overcome the vast plurality of understandings of religion as the academic fields that deal with religion splinter and proliferate, thereby inhibiting the rational treatment of a very important dimension of modern society. The present (...)
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  28. Heinrich Meier (1998). The Lesson of Carl Schmitt: Four Chapters on the Distinction Between Political Theology and Political Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    This book is the culmination of Heinrich Meier's acclaimed analyses of the controversial thought of Carl Schmitt. Meier identifies the core of Schmitt's thought as political theology--that is, political theorizing that claims to have its ultimate ground in the revelation of a mysterious or supra-rational God. This radical, but half-hidden, theological foundation unifies the whole of Schmitt's often difficult and complex oeuvre, cutting through the intentional deceptions and unintentional obfuscations that have eluded previous commentators. Relating this religious dimension to (...)
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  29. Immanuel Kant (1996). Religion and Rational Theology. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This volume collects for the first time in a single volume all of Kant's writings on religion and rational theology. These works were written during a period of conflict between Kant and the Prussian authorities over his religious teachings. His final statement of religion was made after the death of King Frederick William II in 1797. The historical context and progression of this conflict are charted in the general introduction to the volume and in the translators' introductions to particular (...)
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  30. Martin Kavka (2003). Judaism and Theology in Martha Nussbaum's Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):343 - 359.score: 18.0
    The writings of Martha Nussbaum broadly defend an account of transcendence as internal, always rooted in the human context. Her account implies that any and all projects of normative theological ethics are superfluous, since they transcend the natural bounds of human experience and reason. This essay points toward a space for theology, specifically Jewish theology, in Nussbaum's work, through an analysis of her recent philosophical and autobiographical writings on Judaism. Nussbaum's account in Upheavals of Thought associates Judaism with (...)
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  31. Clayton Crockett (2001). A Theology of the Sublime. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Crockett develops a constructive radical theology from the philosophy of Kant. Reading The Critique of Judgment back into The Critique of Pure Reason, Crockett draws upon the insights of such continental philosophers as Heidegger, Derrida, Lyotard and Deleuze. This book shows how existential notions of self, time and imagination are interrelated in Kantian thinking, and demonstrates their importance for theology. An original theology of the sublime emerges as a connection is made between the Kantian sublime of the (...)
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  32. Teresa Obolevitch (2010). Negative Theology and Science in the Thought of Semyon Frank. Studies in East European Thought 62 (1):93 - 99.score: 18.0
    Semën Frank (1877–1950) considered the Universe as the “all-unity.” According to him, everything is a part of the all-unity, which has a divine character. God is present in the world, but his nature is incomprehensible. In this article I analyze two consequences of Frank’s panentheistic view of the relation between science and theology. Firstly, the limits of scientific knowledge allow recognition of the mystery of the world and the transcendence of God. Secondly, Frank claimed that nature is a “trace” (...)
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  33. John Platt (1982). Reformed Thought and Scholasticism: The Arguments for the Existence of God in Dutch Theology, 1575-1650. E.J. Brill.score: 18.0
    CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION This investigation seeks to make a modest contribution to the debate on the changes which took place in Reformed theology in the ...
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  34. Kevin Hector (2011). Theology Without Metaphysics: God, Language, and the Spirit of Recognition. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Therapy for metaphysics -- Concepts, rules, and the spirit of recognition -- Meaning and meanings -- Reference and presence -- Truth and correspondence -- Emancipating theology.
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  35. Matthew C. Halteman (2008). Review of James Bernauer, Jeremy Carrette, Michel Foucault and Theology. [REVIEW] Scottish Journal of Theology 61:368-370.score: 18.0
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  36. Mark G. Nixon (2007). Satisfaction for Whom? Freedom for What? Theology and the Economic Theory of the Consumer. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (1):39 - 60.score: 18.0
    The economic theory of the consumer, which assumes individual satisfaction as its goal and individual freedom to pursue satisfaction as its sine qua non, has become an important ideological element in political economy. Some have argued that the political dimension of economics has evolved into a kind of “secular theology” that legitimates free market capitalism, which has become a kind of “religion” in the United States [Nelson: 1991, Reaching for Heaven on Earth: The Theological Meaning of Economics. (Rowman & (...)
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  37. Gary J. Dorrien (2012). Kantian Reason and Hegelian Spirit: The Idealistic Logic of Modern Theology. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 18.0
    Introduction: Kantian concepts, liberal theology, and post-Kantian idealism -- Subjectivity in question: Immanuel Kant, Johann G. Fichte, and critical idealism -- Making sense of religion: Friedrich Schleiermacher, John Locke, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and liberal theology -- Dialectics of spirit: F.W.J. Schelling, G.W.F. Hegel, and absolute idealism -- Hegelian spirit in question: David Friedrich Strauss, Søren Kierkegaard, and mediating theology -- Neo-Kantian historicism: Albrecht Ritschl, Adolf von Harnack, Wilhelm Herrmann, Ernst Troeltsch, and the Ritschlian school -- Idealistic ordering: (...)
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  38. Chris L. Firestone (2009). Kant and Theology at the Boundaries of Reason. Ashgate.score: 18.0
    This book examines the transcendental dimension of Kant's philosophy as a positive resource for theology.
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  39. Peter Crafts Hodgson (2005). Hegel and Christian Theology: A Reading of the Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This is an analysis of the interpretation of Christian theology that is found in G. W. F. Hegel's Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion. Hodgson argues that these lectures are among the most valuable resources from the nineteenth century for theology as it faces the challenges of modernity and postmodernity. The author is also editing and translating the critical edition of the lectures, which are being published concurrently by Oxford University Press.
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  40. Barry L. Callen (2004). Discerning the Divine: God in Christian Theology. Westminster John Knox Press.score: 18.0
    An ideal introduction to Christian theology, "Discerning the Divine presents the doctrine of God as the most important subject in Christian believing and living ...
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  41. Jacqueline A. Laing (2012). Moral Theology. In George Kurian (ed.), Encyclopaedia of Christian Civilisation. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    An analysis of moral theology, the study of how man must live in order to achieve his highest end, which, according to many theistic outlooks, is union with his maker. A species of theology, it involves the study of things divine, and is distinct from dogmatic theology by virtue of its focus. Whereas dogmatic theology concentrates upon doctrines and articles of faith, moral theology relates, more specifically to the actions of human beings and their relations (...)
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  42. Immanuel Kant (1978). Lectures on Philosophical Theology. Cornell University Press.score: 18.0
    "Lectures on Philosophical Theology is an indispensable addition to Kant's works in English.
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  43. Paul A. B. Clarke & Andrew Linzey (eds.) (1996). Dictionary of Ethics, Theology, and Society. Routledge.score: 18.0
    In over 200 separately-authored entries, this reference surveys both the historical and contemporary relations between religion and society. A selection of the world's leading scholars from varying disciplines and denominations cover all aspects of philosophy, theology, ethics, politics, economics and government, providing a brief definition of each term, a description of the principal ideas behind it, its history, development and contemporary relevance, and a detailed bibliography giving the major sources in the field. The Dictionary is prefaced by an introduction (...)
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  44. Sang Hyun Lee (2000). The Philosophical Theology of Jonathan Edwards. Princeton University Press.score: 18.0
    This book demonstrates the originality and coherence of Jonathan Edwards' philosophical theology using his dynamic reconception of reality as the interpretive key. The author argues that what underlies Edwards' writings is a radical shift from the traditional Western metaphysics of substance and form to a new conception of the world as a network of dispositions: active and abiding principles that possess reality apart from their manifestations in actions and events. Edwards' dispositional ontology enables him to restate the Augustinian-Calvinist tradition (...)
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  45. Telford Work (2008). Pneumatological Relations and Christian Disunity in Theology-Science Dialogue. Zygon 43 (4):897-908.score: 18.0
    Ecclesial divisions shape and distort the developing interdisciplinary dialogue between Christian theology and the natural and social sciences in ways that can be better understood by focusing on pneumatology, specifically on the variety of ways in which by grace we relate to the Holy Spirit—as giver of life, as Lord, as powerful anointing, as God's gift of wisdom, and as wellspring from Jesus Christ. Each denominational camp of Christians has centered its appreciation of the Holy Spirit on one of (...)
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  46. Glenn Branch (2009). Review of William Paley, Natural Theology , Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (1):99-101.score: 18.0
    Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight’s new edition of William Paley’s Natural Theology deserves to become the standard scholarly edition of what is a historically, theologically, and philosophically important work, despite a certain neglect of philosophical issues on the part of the editors.
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  47. John Angus Campbell (1994). Of Orchids, Insects, and Natural Theology: Timing, Tactics, and Cultural Critique in Darwin's Post-?Origin? Strategy. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (1):63-80.score: 18.0
    This essay examines the relation of Darwin's orchids book to a central persuasive flaw in theOrigin: Its inability to give variation sufficient “presence” to break the hold of “design” in the mind of the reader. Darwin characterized the orchids book as “a flank movement on the enemy”; this essay identifies the “enemy” as Paley's natural theology and the “flank” as thetopoi, maxims, and habits of perception that led Darwin's colleagues and contemporaries to see design in nature. Moreover, this essay (...)
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  48. Andres Jimenez Colodrero (2011). Theology and Politics in Thomas Hobbes's Trinitarian Theory. Hobbes Studies 24 (1):62-77.score: 18.0
    This article intends to analyse the Hobbesian version of the Christian dogma of the Trinity as it is observed in the corresponding sections of Leviathan , De Cive and Heresy , and alluded to in other texts (controversy with Bramhall). It shall be important to specify: (a) As a starting point, the exact place of such concept within the general problem expressed by the difference between "political theology" and "theologico-political problem" (C. Altini); (b) The main items of the philosopher's (...)
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  49. Mark Engler (2000). Toward the "Rights of the Poor": Human Rights in Liberation Theology. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):339 - 365.score: 18.0
    In this article, the author traces the response of liberation theologians to human rights initiatives through three distinct stages over the past thirty years: from an initial avoidance of the concept, to an early critique, and then to a nuanced theological appropriation. He contends that liberation theology brings a thoroughgoing concern for the poor and an innovative methodology of historicization to the discussion of human rights. In clarifying the treatment of human rights within a specific religious movement, the author (...)
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  50. Paul A. Nelson (1996). The Role of Theology in Current Evolutionary Reasoning. Biology and Philosophy 11 (4):493-517.score: 18.0
    A remarkable but little studied aspect of current evolutionary theory is the use by many biologists and philosophers of theological arguments for evolution. These can be classed under two heads: imperfection arguments, in which some organic design is held to be inconsistent with God's perfection and wisdom, and homology arguments, in which some pattern of similarity is held to be inconsistent with God's freedom as an artificer. Evolutionists have long contended that the organic world falls short of what one might (...)
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