Search results for 'Theoretic cognition' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Peter Woelert (2012). Idealization and External Symbolic Storage: The Epistemic and Technical Dimensions of Theoretic Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):335-366.score: 242.0
    This paper explores some of the constructive dimensions and specifics of human theoretic cognition, combining perspectives from (Husserlian) genetic phenomenology and distributed cognition approaches. I further consult recent psychological research concerning spatial and numerical cognition. The focus is on the nexus between the theoretic development of abstract, idealized geometrical and mathematical notions of space and the development and effective use of environmental cognitive support systems. In my discussion, I show that the evolution of the (...) cognition of space apparently follows two opposing, but in truth, intrinsically aligned trajectories. On the epistemic plane, which is the main focus of Husserl’s genetic phenomenological investigations, theoretic conceptions of space are progressively constituted by way of an idealizing emancipation of spatial cognition from the concrete, embodied intentionality underlying the human organism’s perception of space. As a result of this emancipation, it ultimately becomes possible for the human mind to theoretically conceive of and posit space as an ideal entity that is universally geometrical and mathematical. At the same time, by synthesizing a range of literature on spatial and mathematical cognition, I illustrate that for the theoretic mind to undertake precisely this emancipating process successfully, and further, for an ideal and objective notion of geometrical and mathematical space to first of all become fully scientifically operative, the cognitive support provided by a range of specific symbolic technologies is central. These include lettered diagrams, notation systems, and more generally, the technique of formalization and require for their functioning various cognitively efficacious types of embodiment. Ultimately, this paper endeavors to understand the specific symbolic-technological dimensions that have been instrumental to major shifts in the development of idealized, scientific conceptions of space. The epistemic characteristics of these shifts have been previously discussed in genetic phenomenology, but without devoting sufficient attention to the constructive role of symbolic technologies. At the same time, this paper identifies some of the irreducible phenomenological and epistemic dimensions that characterize the functioning of the historically situated, embodied and distributed theoretic mind. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Nicholas Rescher (1979). Cognitive Systematization: A Systems-Theoretic Approach to a Coherentist Theory of Knowledge. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 72.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Fred A. Keijzer (2005). Theoretical Behaviorism Meets Embodied Cognition: Two Theoretical Analyses of Behavior. Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):123-143.score: 68.0
    This paper aims to do three things: First, to provide a review of John Staddon's book Adaptive dynamics: The theoretical analysis of behavior. Second, to compare Staddon's behaviorist view with current ideas on embodied cognition. Third, to use this comparison to explicate some outlines for a theoretical analysis of behavior that could be useful as a behavioral foundation for cognitive phenomena. Staddon earlier defended a theoretical behaviorism, which allows internal states in its models but keeps these to a minimum (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Reza Lahroodi (2007). Evaluating Need for Cognition: A Case Study in Naturalistic Epistemic Virtue Theory. Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):227 – 245.score: 66.0
    The recent literature on epistemic virtues advances two general projects. The first is virtue epistemology, an attempt to explicate key epistemic notions in terms of epistemic virtue. The second is epistemic virtue theory, the conceptual and normative investigation of cognitive traits of character. While a great deal of work has been done in virtue epistemology, epistemic virtue theory still languishes in a state of neglect. Furthermore, the existing work is non-naturalistic. The present paper contributes to the development of a naturalistic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Matt Jones & Bradley C. Love (2011). Bayesian Fundamentalism or Enlightenment? On the Explanatory Status and Theoretical Contributions of Bayesian Models of Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):169-188.score: 64.0
    The prominence of Bayesian modeling of cognition has increased recently largely because of mathematical advances in specifying and deriving predictions from complex probabilistic models. Much of this research aims to demonstrate that cognitive behavior can be explained from rational principles alone, without recourse to psychological or neurological processes and representations. We note commonalities between this rational approach and other movements in psychology that set aside mechanistic explanations or make use of optimality assumptions. Through these comparisons, we identify a number (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Keijzer, F. A., Embodied Cognition Meets Theoretical Behaviorism: Two Theoretical Analyses of Behavior.score: 60.0
    John Staddon wrote a book Adaptive dynamics (2001), which explicated his theoretical behaviorism. In this review essay, I compare his theoretical behaviorism with embodied cognition, which also has a strong focus on behavior and also remains critical of mentalistic mechanisms for explaining it.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jackie Andrade (2000). NMDa Receptor--Mediated Consciousness: A Theoretical Framework for Understanding the Effects of Anesthesia on Cognition? In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press. 271--279.score: 58.0
  8. Ralph D. Ellis (2001). A Theoretical Model of the Role of the Cerebellum in Cognition, Attention and Consciousness. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):300-309.score: 58.0
  9. Christian List (2003). Distributed Cognition: A Perspective From Social Choice Theory. In M. Albert, D. Schmidtchen & S. Voigt (eds.), Scientific Competition: Theory and Policy, Conferences on New Political Economy. Mohr Siebeck.score: 54.0
    Distributed cognition refers to processes which are (i) cognitive and (ii) distributed across multiple agents or devices rather than performed by a single agent. Distributed cognition has attracted interest in several fields ranging from sociology and law to computer science and the philosophy of science. In this paper, I discuss distributed cognition from a social-choice-theoretic perspective. Drawing on models of judgment aggregation, I address two questions. First, how can we model a group of individuals as a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jenann Ismael (2011). Reflexivity, Fixed Points, and Semantic Descent; How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Reflexivity. Acta Analytica 26 (4):295-310.score: 54.0
    For most of the major philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, human cognition was understood as involving the mind’s reflexive grasp of its own contents. But other important figures have described the very idea of a reflexive thought as incoherent. Ryle notably likened the idea of a reflexive thought to an arm that grasps itself. Recent work in philosophy, psychology, and the cognitive sciences has greatly clarified the special epistemic and semantic properties of reflexive thought. This article is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Hannes Leitgeb (2004). Inference on the Low Level: An Investigation Into Deduction, Nonmonotonic Reasoning, and the Philosophy of Cognition. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 54.0
    This monograph provides a new account of justified inference as a cognitive process. In contrast to the prevailing tradition in epistemology, the focus is on low-level inferences, i.e., those inferences that we are usually not consciously aware of and that we share with the cat nearby which infers that the bird which she sees picking grains from the dirt, is able to fly. Presumably, such inferences are not generated by explicit logical reasoning, but logical methods can be used to describe (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Steven French (2003). A Model-Theoretic Account of Representation (Or, I Don't Know Much About Art...But I Know It Involves Isomorphism). Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1472-1483.score: 54.0
    Recent discussions of the nature of representation in science have tended to import pre-established decompositions from analyses of representation in the arts, language, cognition and so forth. Which of these analyses one favours will depend on how one conceives of theories in the first place. If one thinks of them in terms of an axiomatised set of logico-linguistic statements, then one might be naturally drawn to accounts of linguistic representation in which notions of denotation, for example, feature prominently. If, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Steven Gross (2005). Context-Sensitive Truth-Theoretic Accounts of Semantic Competence. Mind and Language 20 (1):68–102.score: 54.0
    According to cognitivist truth-theoretic accounts of semantic competence, aspects of our linguistic behavior can be explained by ascribing to speakers cognition of truth theories. It's generally assumed on this approach that, however much context sensitivity speakers' languages contain, the cognized truththeories themselves can be adequately characterized context insensitively—that is, without using in the metalanguage expressions whose semantic value can vary across occasions of utterance. In this paper, I explore some of the motivations for and problems and consequences of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.) (2002). The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press.score: 54.0
    The fifty-seven original essays in this book provide a comprehensive overview of the interdisciplinary field of animal cognition.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Frances Egan (forthcoming). Function-Theoretic Explanation and Neural Mechanisms. In David M. Kaplan (ed.), Integrating Mind and Brain Science: Mechanistic Perspectives and Beyond.score: 54.0
    A common kind of explanation in cognitive neuroscience might be called function-theoretic: with some target cognitive capacity in view, the theorist hypothesizes that the system computes a well-defined function (in the mathematical sense) and explains how computing this function constitutes (in the system’s normal environment) the exercise of the cognitive capacity. Recently, proponents of the so-called ‘new mechanist’ approach in philosophy of science have argued that a model of a cognitive capacity is explanatory only to the extent that it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jeppe Sinding Jensen (2010). Framing Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture Theoretically. In Armin W. Geertz & Jeppe Sinding Jensen (eds.), Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture: Image and Word in the Mind of Narrative. Equinox Pub. Ltd..score: 54.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Matthew J. Barker (2010). From Cognition's Location to the Epistemology of its Nature. Cognitive Systems Research 11 (357):366.score: 52.0
    One of the liveliest debates about cognition concerns whether our cognition sometimes extends beyond our brains and bodies. One party says Yes, another No. This paper shows that debate between these parties has been epistemologically confused and requires reorienting. Both parties frequently appeal to empirical considerations and to extra-empirical theoretical virtues to support claims about where cognition is. These things should constrain their claims, but cannot do all the work hoped. This is because of the overlooked fact, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Tiago V. Maia Guillermo Horga (2012). Conscious and Unconscious Processes in Cognitive Control: A Theoretical Perspective and a Novel Empirical Approach. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 52.0
    Controlled processing is often referred to as “voluntary” or “willful” and therefore assumed to depend entirely on conscious processes. Recent studies using subliminal-priming paradigms, however, have started to question this assumption. Specifically, these studies have shown that subliminally presented stimuli can induce adjustments in control. Such findings are not immediately reconcilable with the view that conscious and unconscious processes are separate, with each having its own neural substrates and modus operandi. We propose a different theoretical perspective that suggests that conscious (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Paul Van den Hoven (forthcoming). Cognitive Semiotics in Argumentation: A Theoretical Exploration. Argumentation:1-20.score: 52.0
    Argumentation is a cognitive category. Texts cannot be said to be argumentation, nor can argumentation be said to lie in texts. This is an almost trivial semiotic point of departure, but it is quite relevant nevertheless. In this contribution, three reasons are developed to emphasize and to articulate the semiotic component of argumentation to show that it is a crucial element that cannot be disregarded. Two of these reasons are mentioned only in passing as other contributions in this volume deal (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Benjamin Trémoulet (2011). The Structure of the Theoretical Power of Judgment. Kant and the Value of Our Empirical Cognitions. Kant-Studien 102 (1):46-68.score: 48.0
    This paper argues that the cognitive status and cognitive value of thoughts should be clarified through a description of the mechanics of the theoretical power of judgment. Three pairs of concepts essentially constitute its tools: 1. determinative and reflective judgments; 2. constitutive and regulative principles; and 3. transcendental and empirical applications. Against the general approach to dealing with these concepts, i.e., against the tendency to consider them as synonymous or as forming a parallel structure, this article sharpens the distinctions between (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Jeff Coulter (1982). Theoretical Problems of Cognitive Science. Inquiry 25 (1):3 – 26.score: 48.0
    Aspects of the controversy concerning the theoretical status of some recent thinking on human cognition are discussed; in particular, the concept of ?unconscious knowledge?, the ?functionalist? analysis of the mental; the problem of the domains of explananda, given the recalcitrant difficulty in providing warrantable and generalizable criteria for individuating components of an organism's ?behavior'; the problem of the polymorphous character of various mental predicates and their misconceived treatment as ?state? or ?process? descriptors; the possible ?over?intellectualizing? of central?nervous?system processes, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Matt Jones & Bradley C. Love (2011). Pinning Down the Theoretical Commitments of Bayesian Cognitive Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):215-231.score: 48.0
    Mathematical developments in probabilistic inference have led to optimism over the prospects for Bayesian models of cognition. Our target article calls for better differentiation of these technical developments from theoretical contributions. It distinguishes between Bayesian Fundamentalism, which is theoretically limited because of its neglect of psychological mechanism, and Bayesian Enlightenment, which integrates rational and mechanistic considerations and is thus better positioned to advance psychological theory. The commentaries almost uniformly agree that mechanistic grounding is critical to the success of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Francisco Barceló, José A. Periáñez & Erika Nyhus (2007). An Information Theoretical Approach to Task-Switching: Evidence From Cognitive Brain Potentials in Humans. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 1:13-13.score: 46.0
    This study aimed to clarify the neural substrates of behavioral switch and restart costs in intermittently instructed task-switching paradigms. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants were intermittently cued to switch or repeat their categorization rule (Switch task), or else they performed two perceptually identical control conditions (NoGo and Oddball). The three tasks involved different task-sets with distinct stimulus-response associations in each, but identical visual stimulation, consisting of frequent colored shapes (p = 0.9) and randomly interspersed infrequent black shapes (p (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Pierre Philippot Alexandre Heeren, Rudi De Raedt, Ernst H. W. Koster (2013). The (Neuro)Cognitive Mechanisms Behind Attention Bias Modification in Anxiety: Proposals Based on Theoretical Accounts of Attentional Bias. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 46.0
    Recently, researchers have investigated the causal nature of attentional bias for threat (AB) in the maintenance of anxiety disorders by experimentally manipulating it. They found that training anxious individuals to attend to nonthreat stimuli reduces AB, which, in turn, reduces anxiety. This effect supports the hypothesis that AB can causally impact the maintenance of anxiety. At a fundamental level, however, uncertainty still abounds regarding the nature of the processes that mediate this effect. In the present paper, we propose that two (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Roberto Cabeza, Elisa Ciaramelli & Morris Moscovitch (2012). Cognitive Contributions of the Ventral Parietal Cortex: An Integrative Theoretical Account. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (6):338-352.score: 46.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. August Stern (2000). Quantum Theoretic Machines: What is Thought From the Point of View of Physics. Elsevier.score: 44.0
    Making Sense of Inner Sense 'Terra cognita' is terra incognita. It is difficult to find someone not taken abackand fascinated by the incomprehensible but indisputable fact: there are material systems which are aware of themselves. Consciousness is self-cognizing code. During homo sapiens's relentness and often frustrated search for self-understanding various theories of consciousness have been and continue to be proposed. However, it remains unclear whether and at what level the problems of consciousness and intelligent thought can be resolved. Science's greatest (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Bertrand R. Munier & Jean-Louis Rulli�re (1993). Are Game Theoretic Concepts Suitable Negotiation Support Tools? From Nash Equilibrium Refinements Toward a Cognitive Concept of Rationality. Theory and Decision 34 (3):235-253.score: 44.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. J. Scott Jordan (2000). The Role of "Control" in an Embodied Cognition. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):233 – 237.score: 42.0
    Borrett, Kelly, and Kwan follow the lead of Merleau-Ponty and develop a theory of neural-network modeling that emerges out of what they find wrong with current approaches to thought and action. Specifically, they take issue with "cognitivism" and its tendency to model cognitive agents as controlling, representational systems. While attempting to make the point that pre-predicative experience/action/place (i.e. grasping) involves neither representation nor control, the authors imply that control-theoretic concepts and representationalism necessarily go hand-in-hand. The purpose of the present (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Thomas J. Fararo (2000). Cognitive Value Commitments in Formal Theoretical Sociology. Sociological Theory 18 (3):475-481.score: 42.0
    This paper aims to communicate some of the value commitments that characterize my approach to formal model building in theoretical sociology. It does this through a narrative method, an autobiographical account of shifts in intellectual interests through various phases of my career: from history to philosophy, from philosophy to sociology, from sociology to mathematics and back, followed by several long-term formal theoretical research programs. One of these, pertaining to the formal representation of institutionalized social action systems, is described in terms (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Georg Theiner (2014). Varieties of Group Cognition. In Lawrence Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge. 347-357.score: 42.0
    Benjamin Franklin famously wrote that “the good [that] men do separately is small compared with what they may do collectively” (Isaacson 2004). The ability to join with others in groups to accomplish goals collectively that would hopelessly overwhelm the time, energy, and resources of individuals is indeed one of the greatest assets of our species. In the history of humankind, groups have been among the greatest workers, builders, producers, protectors, entertainers, explorers, discoverers, planners, problem-solvers, and decision-makers. During the late 19th (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2007). Situated Cognition: The Perspect Model. In David Spurrett, Don Ross, Harold Kincaid & Lynn Stephens (eds.), Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context. MIT Press. 227.score: 42.0
    The standard philosophical and folk-psychological accounts of cognition and action credit us with too much spontaneity in our activities and projects. We are taken to be fundamentally active rather than reactive, to project our needs and aims and deploy our full supporting arsenal of cognitive instruments upon an essentially passive environment. The corrected point of view presented here balances this image of active agency with an appreciation of how we are also continually responding to the world, that is, to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Maurizio Tirassa, Antonella Carassa & Giuliano Geminiani (2000). A Theoretical Framework for the Study of Spatial Cognition. In [Book Chapter].score: 42.0
    We argue that the locomotion of organisms is better understood as a form of interaction with a subjective environment, rather than as a set of behaviors allegedly amenable to objective descriptions. An organism's interactions with its subjective environment are in turn understandable in terms of its cognitive architecture. We propose a large-scale classification of the possible types of cognitive architectures, giving a sketch of the subjective structure that each of them superimposes on space and of the relevant consequences on locomotion. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Hans-Jörg Schmid & Helmut Küchenhoff (2013). Collostructional Analysis and Other Ways of Measuring Lexicogrammatical Attraction: Theoretical Premises, Practical Problems and Cognitive Underpinnings. Cognitive Linguistics 24 (3).score: 42.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Ron Sun, Theoretical Status of Computational Cognitive Modeling.score: 42.0
    This article explores the view that computational models of cognition may constitute valid theories of cognition, often in the full sense of the term ‘‘theory”. In this discussion, this article examines various (existent or possible) positions on this issue and argues in favor of the view above. It also connects this issue with a number of other relevant issues, such as the general relationship between theory and data, the validation of models, and the practical benefits of computational modeling. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Gerry T. M. Altmann (2010). Why Emergentist Accounts of Cognition Are More Theoretically Constraining Than Structured Probability Accounts: Comment on Griffiths Et Al. And McClelland Et Al. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):340.score: 42.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Anthony F. Jorm (1979). The Cognitive and Neurological Basis of Developmental Dyslexia: A Theoretical Framework and Review. Cognition 7 (1):19-33.score: 42.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Robert G. Kunzendorf (1988). Self-Consciousness as the Monitoring of Cognitive States: A Theoretical Perspective. Imagination, Cognition and Personality 7:3-22.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Franson D. Manjali (2000). Meaning, Culture and Cognition. Bahri Publications.score: 42.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface v -- CRITIQUE -- 1. Culture and Semantics 1 -- 2. What is 'Cartesian' in Linguistics? 8 -- 3. Computer, Brain and Grammatical Theory 22 -- DYNAMICAL SEMANTICS -- 4. From Discrete Signs to Dynamic Semantic Continuum 37 -- 5. Catastrophe Theoretic Semantics: -- Towards a Physics of Meaning 50 -- 6. Ontological and Cognitive Bases of kiraka Theory 60 -- 7. 'Force Dynamics' as a Dynamical Sem-antics Model 72 -- METAPHOR -- 8. Body, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Luke Rendell, Laurel Fogarty, William J. E. Hoppitt, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Mike M. Webster & Kevin N. Laland (2011). Cognitive Culture: Theoretical and Empirical Insights Into Social Learning Strategies. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):68-76.score: 42.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Frederick Adams & Kenneth Aizawa (2010). The Value of Cognitivism in Thinking About Extended Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):579-603.score: 40.0
    This paper will defend the cognitivist view of cognition against recent challenges from Andy Clark and Richard Menary. It will also indicate the important theoretical role that cognitivism plays in understanding some of the core issues surrounding the hypothesis of extended cognition.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Kenneth Aizawa (2010). The Value of Cognitivism in Thinking About Extended Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):579-603.score: 40.0
    This paper will defend the cognitivist view of cognition against recent challenges from Andy Clark and Richard Menary. It will also indicate the important theoretical role that cognitivism plays in understanding some of the core issues surrounding the hypothesis of extended cognition.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Beata Stawarska (2006). Mutual Gaze and Social Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):17-30.score: 40.0
    I examine the role of mutual gaze in social cognition. I start by discussing recent studies of joint visual attention in order to show that social cognition is operative in infancy prior to the emergence of theoretical skills required to make judgments about other people's states of mind. Such social cognition depends on the communicative potential inherent in human bodies. I proceed to examine this embodied social cognition in the context of Merleau-Ponty's views on vision. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Harald Maurer (2009). Paul Smolensky, Géraldine Legendre: The Harmonic Mind. From Neural Computation to Optimality-Theoretic Grammar. Vol. 1: Cognitive Architecture. Vol. 2: Linguistic and Philosophical Implications. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (1):141-147.score: 40.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Madeleine Keehner (2011). Spatial Cognition Through the Keyhole: How Studying a Real-World Domain Can Inform Basic Science—and Vice Versa. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):632-647.score: 40.0
    This paper discusses spatial cognition in the domain of minimally invasive surgery. It draws on studies from this domain to shed light on a range of spatial cognitive processes and to consider individual differences in performance. In relation to modeling, the aim is to identify potential opportunities for characterizing the complex interplay between perception, action, and cognition, and to consider how theoretical models of the relevant processes might prove valuable for addressing applied questions about surgical performance and training.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Gerhard Schurz (2005). Non-Monotonic Reasoning From an Evolution-Theoretic Perspective: Ontic, Logical and Cognitive Foundations. Synthese 146 (1-2):37 - 51.score: 40.0
    In the first part I argue that normic laws are the phenomenological laws of evolutionary systems. If this is true, then intuitive human reasoning should be fit in reasoning from normic laws. In the second part I show that system P is a tool for reasoning with normic laws which satisfies two important evolutionary standards: it is probabilistically reliable, and it has rules of low complexity. In the third part I finally report results of an experimental study which demonstrate that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Ron Sun, R. Mathews & and S. Lane, Implicit and Explicit Processes in the Development of Cognitive Skills: A Theoretical Interpretation with Some Practical Implications for Science Education.score: 40.0
    In: E. Vargios (ed.), Educational Psychology Research Focus, pp.1-26. Nova Science Publishers, Hauppauge, NY. 2007.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. William Ramsey (2009). The Harmonic Mind: From Neural Computation to Optimality-Theoretic Grammar-Volume 1: Cognitive Architecture and Volume 2: Linguistic and Philosophical Implications. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 50 (3):172-184.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jerome Gellman (1982). God and Theoretical Entities: Their Cognitive Status. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3):131 - 141.score: 40.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Sandra B. Rosenthal (1968). The Cognitive Status of Theoretical Terms. Dialectica 22 (1):3-17.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Sara J. Nixon & N. Jack Kanak (1985). A Theoretical Account of the Effects of Environmental Context Upon Cognitive Processes. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (2):139-142.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000