Search results for 'Theoretical Entity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mohamed Elsamahi (1994). Could Theoretical Entities Save Realism? In David & Richard Hull & Burian (ed.), PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association. 173 - 180.score: 148.0
    Hacking and other entity realists suggest a strategy to build scientific realism on a stronger foundation than inference to the best explanation. They argue that if beliefs in the existence of theoretical entities are derived from experimentation rather than theories, they can escape the antirealist's criticism and provide a stronger ground for realism. In this paper, an outline and a critique of entity realism are presented. It will be argued that entity realism cannot stand as a (...)
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  2. Paweł Zeidler & Danuta Sobczyńska (1995). The Idea of Realism in the New Experimentalism and the Problem of the Existence of Theoretical Entities in Chemistry. Foundations of Science 1 (4):517-535.score: 132.0
    The paper is focused on some aspects of experimental realism of Ian Hacking, and especially on his manipulability criterion of existence. The problem is here related to chemical molecules, the objects of interest in chemical research. The authors consider whether and to what extent this criterion has been applied in experimental practice of chemistry. They argue that experimentation on is a fundamental criterion of existence of entities in chemistry rather than experimentation with. Some examples regarding studies of structures of complex (...)
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  3. Alec Hyslop (1976). Other Minds as Theoretical Entities. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 54 (August):158-61.score: 130.0
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  4. Alan N. Sussman (1975). Mental Entities of Theoretical Entities. American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (October):277-288.score: 130.0
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  5. Edward MacKinnon (1972). Theoretical Entities and Metatheories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 3 (2):105-117.score: 72.0
    This paper argues that existence claims for theoretical entities must be based on more than their role in one theory. The supplementary evidence should be either observation, whether direct or indirect, or the possibility of detaching the existence claim from one particular theory. A logical schematism for the latter type of support is developed.
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  6. John Woods (1988). Buttercups, GNP's and Quarks: Are Fallacies Theoretical Entities? Informal Logic 10 (2).score: 72.0
    Buttercups, GNP's and Quarks: Are Fallacies Theoretical Entities?
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  7. Howard Sankey (2012). Reference, Success and Entity Realism. Kairos 5:31-42.score: 66.0
    The paper discusses the version of entity realism presented by Ian Hacking in his book, Representing and Intervening. Hacking holds that an ontological form of scientific realism, entity realism, may be defended on the basis of experimental practices which involve the manipulation of unobservable entities. There is much to be said in favour of the entity realist position that Hacking defends, especially the pragmatist orientation of his approach to realism. But there are problems with the position. The (...)
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  8. Phillip H. Wiebe (2004). Finite Spirits as Theoretical Entities. Religious Studies 40 (3):341-350.score: 62.0
    Finite spirits can be plausibly viewed as entities postulated by a theory, comparable to the position on mental states and processes developed in the latter part of the twentieth century. This position is developed here by reference to the account in the synoptic gospels of the exorcism of the Gadarene demoniacs. The role played by specifying causal relationships between postulated entities and objects whose existence is not in doubt is examined. Also, various features of theories are discussed in relation to (...)
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  9. Bas C. Fraassen (1974). Theoretical Entities: The Five Ways. Philosophia 4 (1):95-109.score: 60.0
  10. John D. Bishop (1980). The Analogy Theory of Thinking. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (September):222-238.score: 60.0
  11. Herbert Feigl (ed.) (1958). Concepts, Theories, And The Mind-Body Problem. University of Minnesota Press.score: 60.0
    PAUL OPPENHEIM and HILARY PUTNAM Unity of Science as a Working Hypothesis 1. Introduction 1.1. The expression "Unity of Science" is often encountered, ...
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  12. Charles W. Harvey (1986). Husserl and the Problem of Theoretical Entities. Synthese 66 (2):291 - 309.score: 60.0
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  13. Stephen Maitzen (1995). God and Other Theoretical Entities. Topoi 14 (2):123-134.score: 60.0
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  14. J. J. C. Smart (1956). The Reality of Theoretical Entities. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):1 – 12.score: 60.0
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  15. T. E. Forster (2003). Reasoning About Theoretical Entities. World Scientific Pub..score: 60.0
    As such this book fills a void in the philosophical literature and presents a challenge to every would-be (anti-)reductionist.
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  16. Michael Luntley (1982). Verification, Perception, and Theoretical Entities. Philosophical Quarterly 32 (128):245-261.score: 60.0
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  17. Jerome Gellman (1982). God and Theoretical Entities: Their Cognitive Status. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (3):131 - 141.score: 60.0
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  18. J. P. McKinney (1956). The Status of Theoretical Entities. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 34 (3):207 – 213.score: 60.0
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  19. M. Macleod (2007). Theodore Arabatzis, Representing Electrons: A Biographical Approach to Theoretical Entities, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, ISBN 0-226-02420-2 2005 (296 Pp., US$ 70.00, Cloth). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 38 (1):226-229.score: 60.0
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  20. Grover Maxwell (1962). The Ontological Status of Theoretical Entities. In Herbert Feigl & Grover Maxwell (eds.), Scientific Explanation, Space, and Time: Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science. University of Minnesota Press. 181-192.score: 60.0
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  21. David Mitsuo Nixon (2010). What Would It Mean to Directly Observe Electrons? Principia 8 (1):1-18.score: 58.0
    In this paper it is argued that a proper understanding of the justification of perceptual beliefs leaves open the possibility that normal humans, unaided by microscopes, could genuinely know, by direct observation, of the existence of a theoretical entity like an electron. A particular theory of justification called perceptual responsibilism is presented. If successful, this kind of view would undercut one line of argument that has been given (for example, by Bas van Fraassen) in support of scientific anti-realism. (...)
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  22. Peter Fazekas (2009). Reconsidering the Role of Bridge Laws in Inter-Theoretical Reductions. Erkenntnis 71 (3):303 - 322.score: 56.0
    The present paper surveys the three most prominent accounts in contemporary debates over how sound reduction should be executed. The classical Nagelian model of reduction derives the laws of the target-theory from the laws of the base theory plus some auxiliary premises (so-called bridge laws) connecting the entities of the target and the base theory. The functional model of reduction emphasizes the causal definitions of the target entities referring to their causal relations to base entities. The new-wave model of reduction (...)
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  23. Grover Maxwell (1974). Some Current Trends in Philosophy of Science: With Special Attention to Confirmation, Theoretical Entities, and Mind-Body. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1974:565 - 584.score: 50.0
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  24. Wesley C. Salmon (1970). Explanation and Relevance: Comments on James G. Greeno's 'Theoretical Entities in Statistical Explanation'. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1970:27 - 39.score: 50.0
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  25. James W. Cornman (1971). A Reconstruction of Berkeley: Minds and Physical Objects as Theoretical Entities. Ratio 13.score: 50.0
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  26. James G. Greeno (1970). Theoretical Entities in Statistical Explanation. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1970:3 - 26.score: 50.0
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  27. Theodore Arabatzis (2006). To Theoretical Entities, Chicago Und London (University of Chicago Press) 2006, XIV Und 295 S.; Paperback $28, 00; Cloth $70.00. Alexy, Robert (Hg.), Juristische Grundlagenforschung. Tagung der Deutschen Sektion der Internationalen Vereinigung für Rechts-Und. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37:443-446.score: 50.0
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  28. Grover Maxwell (1999). Theoretical Entities. In Robert Klee (ed.), Scientific Inquiry: Readings in the Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press. 30.score: 50.0
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  29. Conn We (1976). The Ontological Status of Theoretical Entities According to Wilfrid Sellars and Bernard Lonergan. Divus Thomas 79 (1-2):67-73.score: 50.0
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  30. Pawel Zeidler (2010). Is It Possible to Observe Orbitals? On the Problems of Observability and Reality of Theoretical Entities. Filozofia Nauki 18 (4):5.score: 50.0
     
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  31. G. E. Zuriff (1984). Radical Behaviorism and Theoretical Entities. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):572.score: 50.0
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  32. Jack Reynolds (2009). The Master-Slave Dialectic and the 'Sado-Masochistic Entity': Some Objections. Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities 14 (3):11-25.score: 36.0
    Hegel’s famous analyses of the ‘master-slave dialectic’, and the more general struggle for recognition which it is a part of, have been remarkably influential throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Bound up with the dominance of this idea, however, has been a corresponding treatment of sadism and masochism as complicit projects that are mutually necessary for one another in a manner that is structurally isomorphic with the way in which master and slave depend on one another. In clinical diagnoses it (...)
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  33. Bas C. Van Fraassen (2000). Michel Ghins on the Empirical Versus the Theoretical. Foundations of Physics 30 (10):1655-1661.score: 36.0
    Michel Ghins and I are both empiricists, and agree significantly in our critique of “traditional” empiricist epistemology. We differ however in some respects in our interpretation of the scientific enterprise. Ghins argues for a moderate scientific realism which includes the view that acceptance of a scientific theory will bring with it belief in the existence of all those entities, among the entities the theory postulates, that satisfy certain criteria. For Ghins these criteria derive from the criteria for legitimate affirmation of (...)
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  34. Jieli Li (2002). State Fragmentation: Toward a Theoretical Understanding of the Territorial Power of the State. Sociological Theory 20 (2):139-156.score: 36.0
    In existing theories of revolution, the state is narrowly defined as an administrative entity, and state breakdown simply refers to the disintegration of a given political regime. But this narrow definition cannot deal with this question: Why, in a revolutionary situation, do some states become fragmented and others remain unified? I would therefore argue for the broadening of the concept of state breakdown to include the territorial power of the state and to treat the latter as a key analytical (...)
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  35. David Emory Conner (2012). The Plight of a Theoretical Deity. Process Studies 41 (1):111-132.score: 36.0
    In Process Studies 39.1 Marjorie Hewitt Suchocki draws renewed attention to one of the formative issues within early process theology—the question of whether God may best be understood as a single actual entity, as Whitehead had said, or as a serially ordered or personally ordered society of occasions. Suchocki’s support for Whitehead’s original thinking is a welcome event. Unfortunately, Suchocki employs the term “dynamic” to disguise an unresolved incompatibility between temporal and non-temporal process in God. This makes her overall (...)
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  36. Almo Farina & Brian Napoletano (2010). Rethinking the Landscape: New Theoretical Perspectives for a Powerful Agency. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (2):177-187.score: 36.0
    An ecological description of a landscape transcends its geographical definition to characterize it in terms of a complex agency composed of a spatial mosaic, structured energy, information and meaning. Because the dimensions of the landscape encompasses both natural and human processes, it requires a more robust set of theories that incorporate the material components and their perceptual meaning. A biosemiotic approach defines the landscape as the sum of its organisms’ eco-fields, which are spatial configurations that carry meanings connected to specific (...)
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  37. Jack Wilson (1999). Biological Individuality: The Identity and Persistence of Living Entities. Cambridge University Press.score: 34.0
    What makes a biological entity an individual? Jack Wilson shows that past philosophers have failed to explicate the conditions an entity must satisfy to be a living individual. He explores the reason for this failure and explains why we should limit ourselves to examples involving real organisms rather than thought experiments. This book explores and resolves paradoxes that arise when one applies past notions of individuality to biological examples beyond the conventional range, and presents a new analysis of (...)
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  38. Anna Grear (2013). Law's Entities: Complexity, Plasticity and Justice. Jurisprudence 4 (1):76-101.score: 34.0
    This article locates a theoretical reflection on the form of legal subjectivity against twenty-first century complexities and pressures, including the structural complexities visible in biotechnological developments, new hybridities and numerous contemporary theoretical and practical manifestations of heterogeneity, multiplicity and complexity emerging in a range of disciplines, including cybernetics, techno-theory, post-humanism and ecology. The author defends the theoretical and critical utility of understanding the legal subject as an explicit (and explicitly limited ) constructus . Criticising the constructed naturalism (...)
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  39. Gianpiero Cattaneo & Giuseppe Nisticò (1990). A Note on Aerts' Description of Separated Entities. Foundations of Physics 20 (1):119-132.score: 34.0
    The theoretical scheme proposed by Aerts for describing two separated entities as a whole within a question-state structure is considered. The quoted author claims that two relevant axioms characterizing quantum physics cannot hold for a quantum, nonclassical entity consisting of two quantum separate entities. We suggest that Aerts' theory is not adequate, from the empirical point of view, to describe this situation.
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  40. Robert Nola (1980). Fixing the Reference of Theoretical Terms. Philosophy of Science 47 (4):505-531.score: 32.0
    Kripke and Putnam have proposed that terms may be introduced to refer to theoretical entities by means of causal descriptions such as 'whatever causes observable effects O'. It is argued that such a reference-fixing definition is ill-formed and that theoretical beliefs must be involved in fixing the reference of a theoretical term. Some examples of reference-fixing are discussed e.g., the term 'electricity'. The Kripke-Putnam theory can not give an account of how terms may be introduced into science (...)
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  41. James W. Cornman (1968). Mental Terms, Theoretical Terms, and Materialism. Philosophy of Science 35 (March):45-63.score: 32.0
    Some materialists argue that we can eliminate mental entities such as sensations because, like electrons, they are theoretical entities postulated as parts of scientific explanations, but, unlike electrons, they are unnecessary for such explanations. As Quine says, any explanatory role of mental entities can be played by "correlative physiological states and events instead." But sensations are not postulated theoretical entities. This is shown by proposing definitions of the related terms, 'observation term,' and 'theoretical term,' and then classifying (...)
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  42. John D. Sinks (1972). Fictionalism and the Elimination of Theoretical Terms. Philosophy of Science 39 (3):285-290.score: 32.0
    The claim that theoretical entities are not real, that they are merely convenient fictions, has been defended and attacked in diverse ways. This paper is concerned with only one defense of the fictionalist thesis and with a certain realist attack on it. The defense in question is that theories which prima facie make reference to theoretical entities can be revised in such a way that no such apparent reference is made by eliminating all occurrences of theoretical expressions. (...)
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  43. James T. Cushing (1982). Models, High-Energy Theoretical Physics and Realism. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:31 - 56.score: 32.0
    Examples of theory development in quantum field theory and in S-matrix theory are related to three questions of interest to the philosophy of science. The first is the central role of highly abstract, mathematical models in the creation of theories. Second, the process of creation and justification actually used make it plausible that a successful theory is equally well characterized as being stable against attack rather than as being objectively correct. Lastly, the issue of the reality of theoretical entities (...)
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  44. William A. Rottschaefer (1983). Verbal Behaviorism and Theoretical Mentalism: An Assessment of Marras-Sellars Dialogue. Philosophy Research Archives 9:511-534.score: 32.0
    Sellars’ verbal behaviorism demands that linguistic episodes be conceptual in an underivative sense and his theoretical mentalism that thoughts as postulated theoretical entities be modelled on linguistic behaviors. Marras has contended that Sellars’ own methodology requires that semantic categories be theoretical. Thus linguistic behaviors can be conceptual in only a derivative sense. Further he claims that overt linguistic behaviors cannot serve as a model for all thought because thought is primarily symbolic. I support verbal behaviorism by showing (...)
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  45. Pierre Cruse (2004). Scientific Realism, Ramsey Sentences and the Reference of Theoretical Terms. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 18 (2 & 3):133 – 149.score: 30.0
    It is often thought that questions of reference are crucial in assessing scientific realism, construed as the view that successful theories are at least approximately true descriptions of the unobservable; realism is justified only if terms in empirically successful theories generally refer to genuinely existing entities or properties. In this paper this view is questioned. First, it is argued that there are good reasons to think that questions of realism are largely decided by convention and carry no epistemic significance. An (...)
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  46. Adam Toon (2010). The Ontology of Theoretical Modelling: Models as Make-Believe. Synthese 172 (2):301-315.score: 30.0
    The descriptions and theoretical laws scientists write down when they model a system are often false of any real system. And yet we commonly talk as if there were objects that satisfy the scientists’ assumptions and as if we may learn about their properties. Many attempt to make sense of this by taking the scientists’ descriptions and theoretical laws to define abstract or fictional entities. In this paper, I propose an alternative account of theoretical modelling that draws (...)
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  47. Mark Sprevak (forthcoming). Realism and Instrumentalism. In H. Pashler (ed.), The Encyclopedia of the Mind. SAGE Publications.score: 30.0
    The choice between realism and instrumentalism is at the core of concerns about how our scientific models relate to reality: Do our models aim to be literally true descriptions of reality, or is their role only as useful instruments for generating predictions? Realism about X, roughly speaking, is the claim that X exists and has its nature independent of our interests, attitudes, and beliefs. An instrumentalist about X denies this. She claims that talk of X should be understood as no (...)
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  48. Margaret Schabas (2009). Constructing "the Economy". Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (1):3-19.score: 30.0
    Economists study "The Economy," or so one might suppose. Yet this overarching entity is strikingly absent from mainstream theory. Since the 1950s, it has generally been described with a few mathematical propositions and not given a description that attends to institutions, power relations, or the emergent properties that form the leading indicators in macroeconomic theory. There is thus a significant divergence between folk economics and scientific economics on this theoretical entity. This article briefly addresses the history of (...)
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  49. Bruce J. MacLennan (1995). The Investigation of Consciousness Through Phenomenology and Neuroscience. In Joseph E. King & Karl H. Pribram (eds.), Proceedings Scale in Conscious Experience: Third Appalachian Conference on Behavioral Neurodynamics. Lawrence Erlbaum. 23-43.score: 30.0
    The principal problem of consciousness is how brain processes cause subjective awareness. Since this problem involves subjectivity, ordinary scientific methods, applicable only to objective phenomena, cannot be used. Instead, by parallel application of phenomenological and scientific methods, we may establish a correspondence between the subjective and the objective. This correspondence is effected by the construction of a theoretical entity, essentially an elementary unit of consciousness, the intensity of which corresponds to electrochemical activity in a synapse. Dendritic networks correspond (...)
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  50. Michel Ghins (2000). Empirical Versus Theoretical Existence and Truth. Foundations of Physics 30 (10):1643-1654.score: 30.0
    On the basis of an analysis of everyday experience and practice, criteria of legitimate assertions of existence and truth are offered. A specific object, like a newspaper, can be asserted to exist if it has some invariant characteristics and is present in actual perception. A statement, like “This newspaper is black and white,” can be accepted as true if it is well-established in some empirical domain. Each of these criteria provides a sufficient condition for acceptance of existence and truth, respectively, (...)
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