Search results for 'Theories of relativity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sergiu I. Vacaru (2013). Super-Luminal Effects for Finsler Branes as a Way to Preserve the Paradigm of Relativity Theories. Foundations of Physics 43 (6):719-732.score: 543.0
    Using Finsler brane solutions [see details and methods in: S. Vacaru, Class. Quant. Grav. 28:215001, 2011], we show that neutrinos may surpass the speed of light in vacuum which can be explained by trapping effects from gravity theories on eight dimensional (co) tangent bundles on Lorentzian manifolds to spacetimes in general and special relativity. In nonholonomic variables, the bulk gravity is described by Finsler modifications depending on velocity/momentum coordinates. Possible super-luminal phenomena are determined by the width of locally (...)
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  2. Judit X. Madarasz, Istvan Nemeti & Gergely Szekely, First-Order Logic Foundation of Relativity Theories.score: 486.0
    Motivation and perspective for an exciting new research direction interconnecting logic, spacetime theory, relativity--including such revolutionary areas as black hole physics, relativistic computers, new cosmology--are presented in this paper. We would like to invite the logician reader to take part in this grand enterprise of the new century. Besides general perspective and motivation, we present initial results in this direction.
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  3. Jukka Varelius (2003). Autonomy, Subject-Relativity, and Subjective and Objective Theories of Well-Being in Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):363-379.score: 470.0
    Among the different approaches to questions of biomedical ethics, there is a view that stresses the importance of a patient’s right to make her own decisions in evaluative questions concerning her own well-being. This approach, the autonomy-based approach to biomedical ethics, has usually led to the adoption of a subjective theory of well-being on the basis of its commitment to the value of autonomy and to the view that well-being is always relative to a subject. In this article, it is (...)
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  4. Antony Flew (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):78-79.score: 459.0
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  5. J. B. S. Haldane (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):73-74.score: 459.0
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  6. G. J. Whitrow (1951). Theories of Relativity. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):61-68.score: 459.0
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  7. G. J. Whitrow (1951). Review: Theories of Relativity. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):61 - 68.score: 459.0
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  8. L. L. Whyte (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):75-78.score: 459.0
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  9. E. H. Hutten (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):81-a-81.score: 459.0
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  10. Ian Rawlins (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):80-81.score: 459.0
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  11. Makoto Katsumori (1992). The Theories of Relativity and Einstein's Philosophical Turn. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (4):557-592.score: 459.0
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  12. Edmund T. Whitaker (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):71-73.score: 459.0
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  13. Axel Ideström (1948). The Relativity Theories of Einstein--Untenable. Uppsala, Almqvist & Wiksells Boktr..score: 453.0
     
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  14. Luca Lusanna (2004). Book Review: Relativity in Rotating Frames. Relativistic Physics in Rotating Reference Frames. Edited by G.Rizzi and M.L.Ruggiero, (Fundamental Theories of Physics 135), 452 Pp., $193.00. ISBN 1-4020-1805-3. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 34 (8):1281-1282.score: 444.0
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  15. William Lane Craig (1994). The Special Theory of Relativity and Theories of Divine Eternity. Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):19-37.score: 440.0
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  16. Christopher Joseph Fleischman (2009). The Theory of Absolutism: A Unification of the Theory of Relativity and Quantum Theory. American University & Colleges Press.score: 414.0
    This book presents a theory that unifies these theories by using a philosophical approach to disclose an oversight in the theory of relativity.
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  17. Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). Philosophy of Nature, Realism, and the Postulated Ontology of Scientific Theories. In Adam Świeżyński (ed.), Philosophy of Nature Today, Wydawnictwo UKSW, Warszawa. 59–80.score: 399.0
    The first part of the paper is a metatheoretical consideration of such philosophy of nature which allows for using scientific results in philosophical analyses. An epistemological 'judgment' of those results becomes a preliminary task of this discipline: this involves taking a position in the controversy between realistic and antirealistic accounts of science. It is shown that a philosopher of nature has to be a realist, if his task to build true ontology of reality is to be achieved. At the same (...)
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  18. Max Born (1965). Einstein's Theory of Relativity. New York, Dover Publications.score: 398.0
    This excellent, semi-technical account includes a review of classical physics (origin of space and time measurements, Ptolemaic and Copernican astronomy, laws of motion, inertia, and more) and coverage of Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity, discussing the concept of simultaneity, kinematics, Einstein’s mechanics and dynamics, and more.
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  19. Gabriel Vacariu (2014). More Troubles with Cognitive Neuroscience. Einstein's Theory of Relativity and the Hyperverse. University of Bucharest Publishing Company.score: 389.3
    In Part I, Chapter 1, I introduce the EDWs perspective (from my book published in 2012)2. In Part II, I investigate more troubles with cognitive neuroscience. (For other troubles of this “science”, see Vacariu 2012, Vacariu and Vacariu 2013) In Chapter 2, I analyze in detail a particular aspect of human visual perception: spatial cognition. In order to be able to offer more arguments on the idea that cognitive neuroscience is a pseudoscience, I need to investigate spatial cognition, an essential (...)
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  20. Mario Bacelar Valente, Time in the Theory of Relativity: On Natural Clocks, Proper Time, the Clock Hypothesis, and All That.score: 389.3
    When addressing the notion of proper time in the theory of relativity, it is usually taken for granted that the time read by an accelerated clock is given by the Minkowski proper time. However, there are authors like Harvey Brown that consider necessary an extra assumption to arrive at this result, the so-called clock hypothesis. In opposition to Brown, Richard TW Arthur takes the clock hypothesis to be already implicit in the theory. In this paper I will present a (...)
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  21. Mario Bacelar Valente, The Flow of Time in the Theory of Relativity.score: 389.3
    Dennis Dieks advanced the view that the idea of flow of time is implemented in the theory of relativity. The ‘flow’ results from the successive happening/becoming of events along the time-like worldline of a material system. This leads to a view of now as local to each worldline. Each past event of the worldline has occurred once as a nowpoint,and we take there to be an ever-changing present now-point ‘marking’ the unfolding of a physical system. In Dieks’ approach there (...)
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  22. Rolf Schock (1981). The Inconsistency of the Theory of Relativity. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 12 (2):285-296.score: 389.0
    Summary It is here shown that the relativistic doctrine of the relativity of simultaneity is untenable and that both the special and general theories of relativity are inconsistent. It is also shown that the theories can perhaps be made consistent, but excessively weak, through the reintroduction of absolute space and a weakening of the Lorentz transformations. Non-relativistic hypotheses for some events thought to require relativity are suggested. Finally, some conjectures are made on how so wrong (...)
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  23. L. Jánossy (1972). A New Approach to the Theory of Relativity. III. Problem of the Ether. Foundations of Physics 2 (1):9-25.score: 389.0
    The considerations of the two former articles concerning the special and general theories of relativity are extended. The question of the physical reality of the ether and the interpretation of some cosmological problems are discussed. A view is expanded according to which the metric tensor g is taken as the energy momentum tensor of the ether. The gravitational equation of Einstein is considered to represent the equations of motion of the ether. The cosmological red shift is also interpreted (...)
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  24. Amit Hagar (2008). Length Matters: The Einstein–Swann Correspondence and the Constructive Approach to the Special Theory of Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (3):532-556.score: 387.0
    I discuss a rarely mentioned correspondence between Einstein and Swann on the constructive approach to the special theory of relativity, in which Einstein points out that the attempts to construct a dynamical explanation of relativistic kinematical effects require postulating a fundamental length scale in the level of the dynamics. I use this correspondence to shed light on several issues under dispute in current philosophy of spacetime that were highlighted recently in Harvey Brown’s monograph Physical Relativity, namely, Einstein’s view (...)
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  25. Judit X. Madarász, István Németi & Gergely Székely (2006). Twin Paradox and the Logical Foundation of Relativity Theory. Foundations of Physics 36 (5):681-714.score: 385.7
    We study the foundation of space-time theory in the framework of first-order logic (FOL). Since the foundation of mathematics has been successfully carried through (via set theory) in FOL, it is not entirely impossible to do the same for space-time theory (or relativity). First we recall a simple and streamlined FOL-axiomatization Specrel of special relativity from the literature. Specrel is complete with respect to questions about inertial motion. Then we ask ourselves whether we can prove the usual relativistic (...)
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  26. Klaus Hentschel (1990). Philosophical Interpretations of Relativity Theory: 1910-1930. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:169 - 179.score: 384.0
    The paper (given in the section on "Recent work in the History of Philosophy of Science) discusses the method and some of the results of the doctoral dissertation on philosophical interpretations of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity, submitted to the Dept. for History of Science, Univ. of Hamburg, in 1989, also published by Birkhauser, Basel, in 1990. It is claimed that many of the gross oversimplifications, misunderstandings and misinterpretations occurring in more than 2500 texts about the (...)
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  27. Michel Paty (2012). On the Structure of Rationality in the Thought and Invention or Creation of Physical Theories. Principia 15 (2):303.score: 384.0
    We want to consider anew the question, which is recurrent along the history of philosophy, of the relationship between rationality and mathematics, by inquiring to which extent the structuration of rationality, which ensures the unity of its function under a variety of forms (and even according to an evolution of these forms), could be considered as homeomorphic with that of mathematical thought, taken in its movement and made concrete in its theories. This idea, which is as old as philosophy (...)
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  28. John Norton, Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity and the Problems in the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies That Led Him to It.score: 378.0
    Modern readers turning to Einstein’s famous 1905 paper on special relativity may not find what they expect. Its title, “On the electrodynamics of moving bodies,” gives no inkling that it will develop an account of space and time that will topple Newton’s system. Even its first paragraph just calls to mind an elementary experimental result due to Faraday concerning the interaction of a magnet and conductor. Only then does Einstein get down to the business of space and time and (...)
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  29. Ardnés Rivadulla (2004). The Newtonian Limit of Relativity Theory and the Rationality of Theory Change. Synthese 141 (3):417 - 429.score: 372.0
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the question of whether Newtonian mechanics can be derived from relativity theory. Physicists agree that classical mechanics constitutes a limiting case of relativity theory. By contrast, philosophers of science like Kuhn and Feyerabend affirm that classical mechanics cannot be deduced from relativity theory because of the incommensurability between both theories; thus what we obtain when we take the limit c in relativistic mechanics cannot be Newtonian mechanics sensu stricto. (...)
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  30. Andrés Rivadulla (2004). The Newtonian Limit of Relativity Theory and the Rationality of Theory Change. Synthese 141 (3):417 - 429.score: 372.0
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the question of whether Newtonian mechanics can be derived from relativity theory. Physicists agree that classical mechanics constitutes a limiting case of relativity theory. By contrast, philosophers of science like Kuhn and Feyerabend affirm that classical mechanics cannot be deduced from relativity theory because of the incommensurability between both theories; thus what we obtain when we take the limit c → ∞ in relativistic mechanics cannot be Newtonian mechanics (...)
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  31. José G. Vargas & Douglas G. Torr (1986). Revised Robertson's Test Theory of Special Relativity: Space-Time Structure and Dynamics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 16 (11):1089-1126.score: 361.0
    The experimental testing of the Lorentz transformations is based on a family of sets of coordinate transformations that do not comply in general with the principle of equivalence of the inertial frames. The Lorentz and Galilean sets of transformations are the only member sets of the family that satisfy this principle. In the neighborhood of regular points of space-time, all members in the family are assumed to comply with local homogeneity of space-time and isotropy of space in at least one (...)
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  32. Graziella Tonfoni (1998). Relativity Theory of Information and Communication in Natural Language. AI and Society 12 (4):322-327.score: 352.0
    The present paper is meant to summarise and enlighten the theoretical implications of the twin theories of text comprehension and of text compression. Compatibility and non-exclusiveness of particle-like analysis of language and wave-like analysis of intentionality are also demonstrated within the newly established quantum linguistics framework. The informative state of language is viewed as being relatively stable; once activated and subject to motion, therefore reaching a communicative state, different phenomena occur, which may be observed, analysed and visualised through CPP-TRS (...)
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  33. Seungbae Park (2014). Cultural Relativism and the Theory of Relativity. Filosofija. Sociologija 25 (1):44-51.score: 347.7
    Cornea (2012) argues that I (2011) was wrong to use the analogy between morality and motion to defend cultural relativism. I reply that the analogy can be used to clarify what cultural relativism asserts and how a cultural relativist can reply to the criticisms against it. Ockham’s Razor favours the relativist view that there are no moral truths, and hence no culture is better than another. Contrary to what Cornea claims, cultural relativism does not entail that we cannot protect ourselves (...)
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  34. John D. Norton, What Can We Learn About the Ontology of Space and Time From the Theory of Relativity?score: 347.0
    In the exuberance that followed Einstein’s discoveries, philosophers at one time or another have proposed that his theories support virtually every conceivable moral in ontology. I present an opinionated assessment, designed to avoid this overabundance. We learn from Einstein’s theories of novel entanglements of categories once held distinct: space with time; space and time with matter; and space and time with causality. We do not learn that all is relative, that time in the fourth dimension in any non-trivial (...)
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  35. Richard Schlegel (1973). An Interaction Interpretation of Special Relativity Theory. Part II. Foundations of Physics 3 (3):277-295.score: 345.0
    The interaction interpretation of special relativity theory (elaborated in Part I) is discussed in relation to quantum theory. The relativistic transformations (Lorentz processes) of physical variables, on the interaction interpretation, are observation-interaction dependent, just as are the physical values (eigenvalues) of systems described by quantum-theoretic state functions; a common, basic structure of the special relativity and quantum theories can therefore be presented. The constancy of the light speed is shown to follow from interaction-transformations of frequency and wavelength (...)
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  36. W. E. Hagston & I. D. Cox (1985). An Extended Theory of Relativity in a Six-Dimensional Manifold. Foundations of Physics 15 (7):773-805.score: 341.0
    The present paper develops arguments for the need to formulate the basic theories of physics in terms of a six-dimensional manifold, as opposed to the four-dimensional space-time continuum of conventional theory. Employing a purely classical approach, some of the dynamical consequences of such a formulation with regard to both electrodynamics and gravitation are evaluated. The results lead to interesting implications with regard to various questions such as the occurrence and importance of superluminal particles, the existence of two or more (...)
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  37. W. M. de Muynck (1995). Measurement and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and Relativity Theory. Synthese 102 (2):293-318.score: 336.0
    The axiomatic approaches of quantum mechanics and relativity theory are compared with approaches in which the theories are thought to describe readings of certain measurement operations. The usual axioms are shown to correspond with classes of ideal measurements. The necessity is discussed of generalizing the formalisms of both quantum mechanics and relativity theory so as to encompass more realistic nonideal measurements. It is argued that this generalization favours an empiricist interpretation of the mathematical formalisms over a realist (...)
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  38. W. M. De Muynck (1995). Measurement and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and Relativity Theory. Synthese 102 (2):293 - 318.score: 336.0
    The axiomatic approaches of quantum mechanics and relativity theory are compared with approaches in which the theories are thought to describe readings of certain measurement operations. The usual axioms are shown to correspond with classes of ideal measurements. The necessity is discussed of generalizing the formalisms of both quantum mechanics and relativity theory so as to encompass more realistic nonideal measurements. It is argued that this generalization favours an empiricist interpretation of the mathematical formalisms over a realist (...)
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  39. Valerie Tiberius (2007). Substance and Procedure in Theories of Prudential Value. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (3):373 – 391.score: 306.0
    In this paper I argue that the debate between subjective and objective theories of prudential value obscures the way in which elements of both are needed for a comprehensive theory of prudential value. I suggest that we characterize these two types of theory in terms of their different aims: procedural (or subjective) theories give an account of the necessary conditions for something to count as good for a person, while substantive (or objective) theories give an account of (...)
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  40. Hans Reichenbach (1965). The Theory of Relativity and a Priori Knowledge. Berkeley, University of California Press.score: 306.0
    The Theory of Relativity and A Priori Knowledge will hereafter be cited as "RAK. " The German edition is out of print. 2 H. Reichenbach, The Philosophy of ...
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  41. Lillian R. Lieber (1945). The Einstein Theory of Relativity. Toronto, Farrar & Rinehart, Inc..score: 306.0
    PREFACE In this book on the Einstein Theory of Relativity the attempt is made to introduce just enough mathematics to HELP and NOT to HINDER the lay reader/ lay ...
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  42. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.score: 306.0
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation (...)
     
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  43. J. Aharoni (1965). The Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford, Clarendon Press.score: 299.3
     
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  44. C. Møller (1949). On the Definition of the Centre of Gravity of an Arbitrary Closed System in the Theory of Relativity. Dublin, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies.score: 299.3
     
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  45. Kiyokazu Nakatomi (2008). On the Synthesis of the Theory of Relativity and Quantum Theory. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 43:137-143.score: 299.0
    It is said that the theory of relativity and quantum theory are independent of each other. Their relationship is like water and oil. Now, it is very important for modern physics to synthesize them. In Physics and mathematics, Super String theory is studied, but instead of it, the tendimensional world appears. Our world is a three-dimensional world . What is the ten-dimensional world? It is more difficult than the string which is of Plank length. In the ten dimensional world, (...)
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  46. L. Jánossy (1971). A New Approach to the Theory of Relativity. II. The General Theory of Relativity. Foundations of Physics 1 (3):251-267.score: 299.0
    The considerations of Part I are extended and the experimental data and hypotheses that led to the establishment of the general theory of relativity are analyzed. It is found that one of the fundamental assumptions is that light is propagated homogeneously; i.e., by using arbitrary systems of coordinates, propagation of light can be represented by a homogeneous quadratic form. This is shown to be an assumption that can be verified by experiment, at least in principle. As a result of (...)
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  47. Waldyr A. Rodrigues Jr & Marcio A. F. Rosa (1989). The Meaning of Time in the Theory of Relativity and “Einstein's Later View of the Twin Paradox”. Foundations of Physics 19 (6):705-724.score: 299.0
    The purpose of the present paper is to reply to a misleading paper by M. Sachs entitled “Einstein's later view of the Twin Paradox” (TP) (Found. Phys. 15, 977 (1985)). There, by selecting some passages from Einstein's papers, he tried to convince the reader that Einstein changed his mind regarding the asymmetric aging of the twins on different motions. Also Sachs insinuates that he presented several years ago “convincing mathematical arguments” proving that the theory of relativity does not predict (...)
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  48. Abraham Ungar (1986). The Lorentz Transformation Group of the Special Theory of Relativity Without Einstein's Isotropy Convention. Philosophy of Science 53 (3):395-402.score: 299.0
    Inertial frames and Lorentz transformations have a preferred status in the special theory of relativity (STR). Lorentz transformations, in turn, embody Einstein's convention that the velocity of light is isotropic, a convention that is necessary for the establishment of a standard signal synchrony. If the preferred status of Lorentz transformations in STR is not due to some particular bias introduced by a convention on signal synchronism, but to the fact that the Lorentz transformation group is the symmetry group of (...)
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  49. Manfred Neumann (1978). A Probabilistic Analysis of the Difficulties of Unifying Quantum Mechanics with the Theory of Relativity. Foundations of Physics 8 (9-10):721-733.score: 299.0
    A procedure is given for the transformation of quantum mechanical operator equations into stochastic equations. The stochastic equations reveal a simple correlation between quantum mechanics and classical mechanics: Quantum mechanics operates with “optimal estimations,” classical mechanics is the limit of “complete information.” In this connection, Schrödinger's substitution relationsp x → -iħ ∂/∂x, etc, reveal themselves as exact mathematical transformation formulas. The stochastic version of quantum mechanical equations provides an explanation for the difficulties in correlating quantum mechanics and the theory of (...)
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  50. L. Jánossy (1970). A New Approach to the Theory of Relativity. Foundations of Physics 1 (2):111-131.score: 299.0
    The facts that led to establishment of the special theory of relativity are reanalyzed. The analysis leads to the well-known formalism, involving, however, somewhat unusual notations. The object of the analysis is to start more closely from the directly observed experimental facts than is usually done; at the same time, great stress is laid on giving formulations independent of the representation in particular reference systems. A detailed analysis is given as to the actual physical methods involved when introducing three- (...)
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