Search results for 'Theories of relativity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Sergiu I. Vacaru (2013). Super-Luminal Effects for Finsler Branes as a Way to Preserve the Paradigm of Relativity Theories. Foundations of Physics 43 (6):719-732.
    Using Finsler brane solutions [see details and methods in: S. Vacaru, Class. Quant. Grav. 28:215001, 2011], we show that neutrinos may surpass the speed of light in vacuum which can be explained by trapping effects from gravity theories on eight dimensional (co) tangent bundles on Lorentzian manifolds to spacetimes in general and special relativity. In nonholonomic variables, the bulk gravity is described by Finsler modifications depending on velocity/momentum coordinates. Possible super-luminal phenomena are determined by the width of locally (...)
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  2.  28
    Judit X. Madarasz, Istvan Nemeti & Gergely Szekely, First-Order Logic Foundation of Relativity Theories.
    Motivation and perspective for an exciting new research direction interconnecting logic, spacetime theory, relativity--including such revolutionary areas as black hole physics, relativistic computers, new cosmology--are presented in this paper. We would like to invite the logician reader to take part in this grand enterprise of the new century. Besides general perspective and motivation, we present initial results in this direction.
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  3.  47
    Edmund T. Whitaker (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):71-73.
  4.  29
    Jukka Varelius (2003). Autonomy, Subject-Relativity, and Subjective and Objective Theories of Well-Being in Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):363-379.
    Among the different approaches to questions of biomedical ethics, there is a view that stresses the importance of a patient’s right to make her own decisions in evaluative questions concerning her own well-being. This approach, the autonomy-based approach to biomedical ethics, has usually led to the adoption of a subjective theory of well-being on the basis of its commitment to the value of autonomy and to the view that well-being is always relative to a subject. In this article, it is (...)
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  5.  47
    Ian Rawlins (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):80-81.
  6.  53
    J. B. S. Haldane (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):73-74.
  7.  39
    E. H. Hutten (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):81-a-81.
  8.  38
    G. J. Whitrow (1951). Theories of Relativity. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):61-68.
  9.  21
    Antony Flew (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):78-79.
  10.  2
    Makoto Katsumori (1992). The Theories of Relativity and Einstein's Philosophical Turn. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (4):557-592.
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  11.  3
    G. J. Whitrow (1951). Review: Theories of Relativity. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):61 - 68.
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  12.  9
    L. L. Whyte (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):75-78.
  13. G. J. Whitrow (1951). THEORIES OF RELATIVITY. "Albert Einstein: Philosopher-Scientist" Edited by Paul Arthur Schilpp: Essay. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 ([5/8]):61.
     
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  14. Axel Ideström (1948). The Relativity Theories of Einstein--Untenable. Uppsala, Almqvist & Wiksells Boktr..
     
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  15.  19
    William Lane Craig (1994). The Special Theory of Relativity and Theories of Divine Eternity. Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):19-37.
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  16.  78
    Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). Philosophy of Nature, Realism, and the Postulated Ontology of Scientific Theories. In Adam Świeżyński (ed.), Philosophy of Nature Today, Wydawnictwo UKSW, Warszawa. 59–80.
    The first part of the paper is a metatheoretical consideration of such philosophy of nature which allows for using scientific results in philosophical analyses. An epistemological 'judgment' of those results becomes a preliminary task of this discipline: this involves taking a position in the controversy between realistic and antirealistic accounts of science. It is shown that a philosopher of nature has to be a realist, if his task to build true ontology of reality is to be achieved. At the same (...)
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  17. L. L. Whyte (1951). Theories of Relativity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):68-71.
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  18.  17
    Michel Paty (2012). On the Structure of Rationality in the Thought and Invention or Creation of Physical Theories. Principia 15 (2):303.
    We want to consider anew the question, which is recurrent along the history of philosophy, of the relationship between rationality and mathematics, by inquiring to which extent the structuration of rationality, which ensures the unity of its function under a variety of forms (and even according to an evolution of these forms), could be considered as homeomorphic with that of mathematical thought, taken in its movement and made concrete in its theories. This idea, which is as old as philosophy (...)
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  19.  34
    Max Born (1965). Einstein's Theory of Relativity. New York, Dover Publications.
    This excellent, semi-technical account includes a review of classical physics (origin of space and time measurements, Ptolemaic and Copernican astronomy, laws of motion, inertia, and more) and coverage of Einstein’s special and general theories of relativity, discussing the concept of simultaneity, kinematics, Einstein’s mechanics and dynamics, and more.
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  20. Luciano Boi (2004). Theories of Space-Time in Modern Physics. Synthese 139 (3):429 - 489.
    The physicist's conception of space-time underwent two major upheavals thanks to the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. Both theories play a fundamental role in describing the same natural world, although at different scales. However, the inconsistency between them emerged clearly as the limitation of twentieth-century physics, so a more complete description of nature must encompass general relativity and quantum mechanics as well. The problem is a theorists' problem par excellence. Experiment provide little guide, and the (...)
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  21.  61
    Ardnés Rivadulla (2004). The Newtonian Limit of Relativity Theory and the Rationality of Theory Change. Synthese 141 (3):417 - 429.
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the question of whether Newtonian mechanics can be derived from relativity theory. Physicists agree that classical mechanics constitutes a limiting case of relativity theory. By contrast, philosophers of science like Kuhn and Feyerabend affirm that classical mechanics cannot be deduced from relativity theory because of the incommensurability between both theories; thus what we obtain when we take the limit c in relativistic mechanics cannot be Newtonian mechanics sensu stricto. (...)
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  22.  8
    Christopher Joseph Fleischman (2009). The Theory of Absolutism: A Unification of the Theory of Relativity and Quantum Theory. American University & Colleges Press.
    This book presents a theory that unifies these theories by using a philosophical approach to disclose an oversight in the theory of relativity.
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  23. Amit Hagar (2008). Length Matters: The Einstein–Swann Correspondence and the Constructive Approach to the Special Theory of Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (3):532-556.
    I discuss a rarely mentioned correspondence between Einstein and Swann on the constructive approach to the special theory of relativity, in which Einstein points out that the attempts to construct a dynamical explanation of relativistic kinematical effects require postulating a fundamental length scale in the level of the dynamics. I use this correspondence to shed light on several issues under dispute in current philosophy of spacetime that were highlighted recently in Harvey Brown’s monograph Physical Relativity, namely, Einstein’s view (...)
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  24.  19
    L. Jánossy (1972). A New Approach to the Theory of Relativity. III. Problem of the Ether. Foundations of Physics 2 (1):9-25.
    The considerations of the two former articles concerning the special and general theories of relativity are extended. The question of the physical reality of the ether and the interpretation of some cosmological problems are discussed. A view is expanded according to which the metric tensor g is taken as the energy momentum tensor of the ether. The gravitational equation of Einstein is considered to represent the equations of motion of the ether. The cosmological red shift is also interpreted (...)
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  25.  25
    Rolf Schock (1981). The Inconsistency of the Theory of Relativity. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 12 (2):285-296.
    Summary It is here shown that the relativistic doctrine of the relativity of simultaneity is untenable and that both the special and general theories of relativity are inconsistent. It is also shown that the theories can perhaps be made consistent, but excessively weak, through the reintroduction of absolute space and a weakening of the Lorentz transformations. Non-relativistic hypotheses for some events thought to require relativity are suggested. Finally, some conjectures are made on how so wrong (...)
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  26.  9
    Klaus Hentschel (1990). Philosophical Interpretations of Relativity Theory: 1910-1930. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:169 - 179.
    The paper (given in the section on "Recent work in the History of Philosophy of Science) discusses the method and some of the results of the doctoral dissertation on philosophical interpretations of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity, submitted to the Dept. for History of Science, Univ. of Hamburg, in 1989, also published by Birkhauser, Basel, in 1990. It is claimed that many of the gross oversimplifications, misunderstandings and misinterpretations occurring in more than 2500 texts about the (...)
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  27.  68
    Valerie Tiberius (2007). Substance and Procedure in Theories of Prudential Value. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (3):373 – 391.
    In this paper I argue that the debate between subjective and objective theories of prudential value obscures the way in which elements of both are needed for a comprehensive theory of prudential value. I suggest that we characterize these two types of theory in terms of their different aims: procedural (or subjective) theories give an account of the necessary conditions for something to count as good for a person, while substantive (or objective) theories give an account of (...)
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  28.  10
    William L. Vanderburgh (2014). On the Interpretive Role of Theories of Gravity and ‘Ugly’ Solutions to the Total Evidence for Dark Matter. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 47:62-67.
    Peter Kosso (2013) discusses the weak gravitational lensing observations of the Bullet Cluster and argues that dark matter can be detected in this system solely through the equivalence principle without the need to specify a full theory of gravity. This paper argues that Kosso gets some of the details wrong in his analysis of the implications of the Bullet Cluster observations for the Dark Matter Double Bind and the possibility of constructing robust tests of theories of gravity at galactic (...)
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  29. John Norton, Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity and the Problems in the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies That Led Him to It.
    Modern readers turning to Einstein’s famous 1905 paper on special relativity may not find what they expect. Its title, “On the electrodynamics of moving bodies,” gives no inkling that it will develop an account of space and time that will topple Newton’s system. Even its first paragraph just calls to mind an elementary experimental result due to Faraday concerning the interaction of a magnet and conductor. Only then does Einstein get down to the business of space and time and (...)
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  30.  15
    Andrés Rivadulla (2004). The Newtonian Limit of Relativity Theory and the Rationality of Theory Change. Synthese 141 (3):417 - 429.
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the question of whether Newtonian mechanics can be derived from relativity theory. Physicists agree that classical mechanics constitutes a limiting case of relativity theory. By contrast, philosophers of science like Kuhn and Feyerabend affirm that classical mechanics cannot be deduced from relativity theory because of the incommensurability between both theories; thus what we obtain when we take the limit c → ∞ in relativistic mechanics cannot be Newtonian mechanics (...)
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  31.  2
    Maja Lovrenov (2006). The Role of Invariance in Cassirer's Interpretation of the Theory of Relativity. Synthesis Philosophica 21 (2):233-241.
    The paper considers Cassirer’s account of the philosophical problems raised by the theory of relativity. The main question the paper addresses is how Cassirer, as a Neokantian, responds to the discoveries made by Einstein. The problem here is especially the presupposition of the a priori nature of Euclidean geometry. Cassirer’s answer lies in showing that Kant’s philosophy is broad enough to include also non-Euclidean geometries in the determination of the physical world. He does this by showing that though Kant (...)
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  32. Chaehyun Chong (1997). Abstraction and Theories of Lei : A Response to Chad Hansen's Mereological Interpretation of Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    My aim in this dissertation is to challenge Chad Hansen's mereological interpretation of ancient Chinese philosophy by providing my own interpretation based on theories of lei. Hansen's mereological interpretation is composed of two radical claims: One is to say that since ancient Chinese philosophy is dominated by nominalism, we do not have to introduce any abstract entities in interpreting ancient Chinese philosophy. The other is to say that Chinese nominalism is mereological. ;Against Hansen's first claim, I argue that since (...)
     
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  33. Bertrand Russell (2001). Abc of Relativity. Routledge.
    Ask a dozen people to name a genius and the odds are that 'Einstein' will spring to their lips. Ask them the meaning of 'relativity' and few of them will be able to tell you what it is. The basic principles of relativity have not changed since Russell first published his lucid guide for the general reader. The _ABC of Relativity_ is Bertrand Russell's most brilliant work of scientific popularisation. With marvellous lucidity he steers the reader who has (...)
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  34. Sean Gryb & Karim Thébault (2012). The Role of Time in Relational Quantum Theories. Foundations of Physics 42 (9):1210-1238.
    We propose a solution to the problem of time for systems with a single global Hamiltonian constraint. Our solution stems from the observation that, for these theories, conventional gauge theory methods fail to capture the full classical dynamics of the system and must therefore be deemed inappropriate. We propose a new strategy for consistently quantizing systems with a relational notion of time that does capture the full classical dynamics of the system and allows for evolution parametrized by an equitable (...)
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  35. Gustavo E. Romero (2012). Philosophical Problems of Space-Time Theories. In Gravitation and Cosmology.
    I present a discussion of some open issues in the philosophy of space-time theories. Emphasis is put on the ontological nature of space and time, the relation between determinism and predictability, the origin of irreversible processes in an expanding Universe, and the compatibility of relativity and quantum mechanics. In particular, I argue for a Parmenidean view of time and change, I make clear the difference between ontological determinism and predictability, propose that the origin of the asymmetry observed in (...)
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  36.  50
    Guido Rizzi, Matteo Luca Ruggiero & Alessio Serafini (2004). Synchronization Gauges and the Principles of Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 34 (12):1835-1887.
    The axiomatic bases of Special Relativity Theory (SRT) are thoroughly re-examined from an operational point of view, with particular emphasis on the status of Einstein synchronization in the light of the possibility of arbitrary synchronization procedures in inertial reference frames. Once correctly and explicitly phrased, the principles of SRT allow for a wide range of “theories” that differ from the standard SRT only for the difference in the chosen synchronization procedures, but are wholly equivalent to SRT in predicting (...)
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  37.  53
    Wu Zhong Chao (1997). The Beauty of General Relativity. Foundations of Science 2 (1):61-64.
    The author proposes to add another dichotomy to the list of essential tensions proposed by Professor Duda, namely beauty and ugliness. Physicists believe that only beautiful theories describe the world correctly, and that General Relativity is one of the most beautiful physical theories. The author explains why physicists regard this theory as beautiful.
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  38. Peter Gärdenfors & Frank Zenker (2013). Theory Change as Dimensional Change: Conceptual Spaces Applied to the Dynamics of Empirical Theories. Synthese 190 (6):1039-1058.
    This paper offers a novel way of reconstructing conceptual change in empirical theories. Changes occur in terms of the structure of the dimensions—that is to say, the conceptual spaces—underlying the conceptual framework within which a given theory is formulated. Five types of changes are identified: (1) addition or deletion of special laws, (2) change in scale or metric, (3) change in the importance of dimensions, (4) change in the separability of dimensions, and (5) addition or deletion of dimensions. Given (...)
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  39.  12
    Richard Staley (2008). Einstein's Generation: The Origins of the Relativity Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
    Much of the history of physics at the beginning of the twentieth century has been written with a sharp focus on a few key figures and a handful of notable events. Einstein’s Generation offers a distinctive new approach to the origins of modern physics by exploring both the material culture that stimulated relativity and the reaction of Einstein’s colleagues to his pioneering work. Richard Staley weaves together the diverse strands of experimental and theoretical physics, commercial instrument making, and the (...)
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  40.  14
    Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock (2012). Husserl's Conception of Physical Theories and Physical Geometry in the Time of the Prolegomena: A Comparison with Duhem's and Poincaré's Views. Axiomathes 22 (1):171-193.
    This paper discusses Husserl’s views on physical theories in the first volume of his Logical Investigations, and compares them with those of his contemporaries Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincaré. Poincaré’s views serve as a bridge to a discussion of Husserl’s almost unknown views on physical geometry from about 1890 on, which in comparison even with Poincaré’s—not to say Frege’s—or almost any other philosopher of his time, represented a rupture with the philosophical tradition and were much more in tune with (...)
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  41.  22
    Guillermo Rosado Haddock (2012). Husserl's Conception of Physical Theories and Physical Geometry in the Time of the Prolegomena : A Comparison with Duhem's and Poincaré's Views. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 22 (1):171-193.
    This paper discusses Husserl’s views on physical theories in the first volume of his Logical Investigations , and compares them with those of his contemporaries Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincaré. Poincaré’s views serve as a bridge to a discussion of Husserl’s almost unknown views on physical geometry from about 1890 on, which in comparison even with Poincaré’s—not to say Frege’s—or almost any other philosopher of his time, represented a rupture with the philosophical tradition and were much more in tune (...)
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  42.  97
    Simon Saunders (2003). Critical Notice: Tian Yu Cao's “the Conceptual Development of 20th Century Field Theories”. [REVIEW] Synthese 136 (1):79-105.
    Tian Yu Cao has written a serious and scholarly book covering a great deal of physics. He ranges from classical relativity theory, both special and general, to relativistic quantum …eld theory, including non-Abelian gauge theory, renormalization theory, and symmetry-breaking, presenting a detailed and very rich picture of the mainstream developments in quantum physics; a remarkable feat. It has, moreover, a philosophical message: according to Cao, the development of these theories is inconsistent with a Kuhnian view of theory change, (...)
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  43. Daniel Peterson & Michael Silberstein (2010). Relativity of Simultaneity and Eternalism: In Defense of Blockworld. In Vesselin Petkov (ed.), Space, Time, and Spacetime: Physical and Philosophical Implications of Minkowski's Unification of Space and Time. Springer
    Ever since the now infamous comments made by Hermann Minkowski in 1908 concerning the proper way to view space-time, the debate has raged as to whether or not the universe should be viewed as a four-dimensional, unified whole wherein the past, present, and future are equally real or whether the views espoused by the possibilists, historicists, and presentists regarding the unreality of the future (and, for presentists, the past) are best. Now, a century after Minkowski’s proposed blockworld first sparked debate, (...)
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  44. Harvey R. Brown & Roland Sypel (1995). On the Meaning of the Relativity Principle and Other Symmetries. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 9 (3):235 – 253.
    Abstract The historical evolution of the principle of relativity from Galileo to Einstein is briefly traced, and purported difficulties with Einstein's formulation of the principle are examined and dismissed. This formulation is then compared to a precise version formulated recently in the geometrical language of spacetime theories. We claim that the recent version is both logically puzzling and fails to capture a crucial physical insight contained in the earlier formulations. The implications of this claim for the modern treatment (...)
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  45.  12
    Christian G. Böhmer & Nicola Tamanini (2013). A New Approach to Modifying Theories of Gravity. Foundations of Physics 43 (12):1478-1488.
    We propose a new point of view for interpreting Newton’s and Einstein’s theories of gravity. By taking inspiration from Continuum Mechanics and its treatment of anisotropies, we formulate new gravitational actions for modified theories of gravity. These models are simple and natural generalisations with many interesting properties. Above all, their precise form can, in principle, be determined experimentally.
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  46.  98
    J. Berkovitz (1998). Aspects of Quantum Non-Locality II: Superluminal Causation and Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 29 (4):509-545.
    In a preceding paper, I studied the significance of Jarrett's and Shimony's analyses of 'factorisability' into 'parameter independence' and 'outcome independence' for clarifying the nature of non-locality in quantum phenomena. I focused on four types of non-locality; superluminal signalling, action-at-a-distance, non-separability and holism. In this paper, I consider a fifth type of non-locality: superluminal causation according to 'logically weak' concepts of causation, where causal dependence requires neither action nor signalling. I conclude by considering the compatibility of non-factorisable theories with (...)
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  47.  26
    Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2015). The Structure of Scientific Theories. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Scientific inquiry has led to immense explanatory and technological successes, partly as a result of the pervasiveness of scientific theories. Relativity theory, evolutionary theory, and plate tectonics were, and continue to be, wildly successful families of theories within physics, biology, and geology. Other powerful theory clusters inhabit comparatively recent disciplines such as cognitive science, climate science, molecular biology, microeconomics, and Geographic Information Science (GIS). Effective scientific theories magnify understanding, help supply legitimate explanations, and assist in formulating (...)
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  48.  18
    Hans-Jürgen Treder (1985). On the Physical Meaning of Gauge and Super-Gauge in General-Relativistic Field Theories. Foundations of Physics 15 (5):579-604.
    The physical meaning of gauge groups in bimetrical, Riemannian, and Hermitian theories of gravitation is discussed. In Hermitian relativity, Einstein's A-invariance means a super-gauge group which characterizes the Einstein-Schrödinger equations as the only nondegenerate general-relativistic field theory.
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  49.  6
    José G. Vargas & Douglas G. Torr (1986). Revised Robertson's Test Theory of Special Relativity: Space-Time Structure and Dynamics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 16 (11):1089-1126.
    The experimental testing of the Lorentz transformations is based on a family of sets of coordinate transformations that do not comply in general with the principle of equivalence of the inertial frames. The Lorentz and Galilean sets of transformations are the only member sets of the family that satisfy this principle. In the neighborhood of regular points of space-time, all members in the family are assumed to comply with local homogeneity of space-time and isotropy of space in at least one (...)
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  50.  9
    Friedrich W. Hehl & J. Dermott McCrea (1986). Bianchi Identities and the Automatic Conservation of Energy-Momentum and Angular Momentum in General-Relativistic Field Theories. Foundations of Physics 16 (3):267-293.
    Automatic conservation of energy-momentum and angular momentum is guaranteed in a gravitational theory if, via the field equations, the conservation laws for the material currents are reduced to the contracted Bianchi identities. We first execute an irreducible decomposition of the Bianchi identities in a Riemann-Cartan space-time. Then, starting from a Riemannian space-time with or without torsion, we determine those gravitational theories which have automatic conservation: general relativity and the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory, both with cosmological constant, and the nonviable pseudoscalar (...)
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