Search results for 'Theresa Smith' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Theresa Smith (2011). In Memoriam: Janet Gnosspelius. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 16 (1-2):167-176.score: 240.0
    Architect and Conservationist; born, July 29, 1926, died, July 18, 2010.
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  2. Theresa S. Smith (1989). Ojibwe Persons: Toward a Phenomenology of an American Indian Lifeworld. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 20 (2):130-144.score: 240.0
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  3. Donald A. Smith, James G. Greeno & Theresa M. Vitolo (1989). A Model of Competence for Counting. Cognitive Science 13 (2):183-211.score: 240.0
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  4. Robert A. Carrere, Theresa S. Smith, Bernd Jager, John W. Osborne, Ken Shapiro, Douglas M. Snyder & Larry Davidson (1989). Brill Online Books and Journals. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 20 (2).score: 240.0
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  5. Christopher J. Berry, Maria Pia Paganelli & Craig Smith (eds.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Adam Smith. Oxford University Press.score: 210.0
    Preface Introduction Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith: Outline of Life, Times, and Legacy Part One: Adam Smith: Heritage and Contemporaries 1: Nicholas Phillipson: Adam Smith: A Biographer's Reflections 2: Leonidas Montes: Newtonianism and Adam Smith 3: Dennis C. Rasmussen: Adam Smith and Rousseau: Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment 4: Christopher J. Berry: Adam Smith and Early Modern Thought Part Two: Adam Smith on Language, Art and Culture 5: Catherine Labio: Adam Smith's Aesthetics 6: James (...)
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  6. Craig Smith (2006). Adam Smith's Political Philosophy: The Invisible Hand and Spontaneous Order. Routledge.score: 150.0
    When Adam Smith published his celebrated writings on economics and moral philosophy he famously referred to the operation of an invisible hand. Adam Smith's Political Philosophy makes visible the invisible hand by examining its significance in Smith's political philosophy and relating it to similar concepts used by other philosophers, revealing a distinctive approach to social theory that stresses the significance of the unintended consequences of human action. This book introduces greater conceptual clarity to the discussion of the (...)
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  7. Vincent Michael Colapietro & John Edwin Smith (eds.) (1997). Reason, Experience, and God: John E. Smith in Dialogue. Fordham University Press.score: 150.0
    John E. Smith has contributed to contemporary philosophy in primarily four distinct capacities; first, as a philosopher of religion and God; second, as an indefatigable defender of philosophical reflection in its classical sense ( a sense inclusive of, but not limited to, metaphysics); third, as a participant in the reconstruction of experience and reason so boldly inaugurated by Hegel then redically transformed by the classical American pragmatists, and significantly augmented by such thinkers as Josiah Royce, william Earnest Hocking, and (...)
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  8. Adam Smith (2002 (1759)). Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments (Ed. K. Haakonssen). Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    A new edition of Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments, an important text in the history of moral and political thought.
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  9. Adam Smith (1980). The Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence of Adam Smith: III: Essays on Philosophical Subjects: With Dugald Stewart's `Account of Adam Smith'. OUP Oxford.score: 150.0
    Enth.: Dugoald Stewart's account of Adam Smith / ed. by I. S. Ross.
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  10. Adam Smith (1976). The Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence of Adam Smith: I: The Theory of Moral Sentiments (D.D. Raphael and A.L. Macfie (Eds.)). OUP Oxford.score: 150.0
    A scholarly edition of a work by Adam Smith. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus.
     
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  11. Adam Smith, The Glasgow Edition of the Works and Correspondence of Adam Smith in 7 Vols.score: 120.0
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  12. Nick Smith, EPIPHENOMENALISM Keith Campbell and Nicholas J.J. Smith December 1993.score: 120.0
    Epiphenomenalism is a theory concerning the relation between the mental and physical realms, regarded as radically different in nature. The theory holds that only physical states have causal power, and that mental states are completely dependent on them. The mental realm, for epiphenomenalists, is nothing more than a series of conscious states which signify the occurrence of states of the nervous system, but which play no causal role. For example, my feeling sleepy does not cause my yawning — rather, both (...)
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  13. Basil Smith (2013). Epistemology, by Ian Evans and Nicholas Smith. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 36 (2):204-209.score: 120.0
  14. John Maynard Smith (2002). Commentary on Kerr and Godfrey-Smith. Biology and Philosophy 17 (4):523-527.score: 120.0
  15. Jan Smith (1983). Book Review:Participation in Social and Political Activities. David Horton Smith. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (2):411-.score: 120.0
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  16. Huston Smith (2001). Huston Smith Replies to Barbour, Goodenough, and Peterson. Zygon 36 (2):223-231.score: 120.0
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  17. David W. E. Smith (1995). Chance and Longevity. David W. E. Smith Replies. Bioessays 17 (5):466-467.score: 120.0
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  18. John E. Smith (1980). Comments on Beth J. Singer's "John E. Smith on Pragmatism". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 16 (1):26 - 33.score: 120.0
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  19. Anna Smith (2005). Appendix 2: Creating Red Rain: Choreographer Anna Smith's Annotations of Video, March-September 1999. In Robin Grove, Kate Stevens & Shirley McKechnie (eds.), Thinking in Four Dimensions: Creativity and Cognition in Contemporary Dance. Melbourne Up. 203.score: 120.0
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  20. Vincent Edward Smith (1955). Philosophical Studies in Honor of the Very Reverend Ignatius Smith, O.P. The Modern Schoolman 32 (3):290-291.score: 120.0
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  21. William Benjamin Smith (1911). Comment by William Benjamin Smith. The Monist 21 (1):119-124.score: 120.0
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  22. Craig Smith (2013). Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel and Political Theory. Intellectual History Review 23 (4):595-596.score: 120.0
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  23. Adam Smith (2001). N. Craig Smith. In Alan R. Malachowski (ed.), Business Ethics: Critical Perspectives on Business and Management. Routledge. 2--84.score: 120.0
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  24. J. D. Cohen & E. E. Smith (1997). Response From Cohen and Smith. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):126-127.score: 120.0
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  25. Jonathan Smith (1994). 6 Art and Science: The Method of Ruskin's Modern Painters Jonathan Smith. In Peter Achinstein & Laura J. Snyder (eds.), Scientific Methods: Conceptual and Historical Problems. Krieger Pub. Co.. 119.score: 120.0
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  26. Adam Smith (1948). Adam Smith's Moral and Political Philosophy. New York, Hafner Pub. Co..score: 120.0
    The theory of moral sentiments.--Lectures on justice, police, revenue and arms.--An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations.
     
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  27. Jonathan Z. Smith, Willi Braun & Russell T. McCutcheon (eds.) (2008). Introducing Religion: Essays in Honor of Jonathan Z. Smith. Equinox Pub..score: 120.0
     
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  28. Kenny Smith (2009). Reconsidering Human Cross-Situational Learning Capacities: A Revision to Yu & Smith's (2007) Experimental Paradigm. In. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 2711--2716.score: 120.0
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  29. Craig Smith (2010). Smith. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.score: 120.0
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  30. Mbe Smith (1991). Smith Against Law and Ethicists-Reply. Law and Philosophy 10 (4):427-432.score: 120.0
     
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  31. Norman Kemp Smith (1967). The Credibility of Divine Existence: The Collected Papers of Norman Kemp Smith. New York, St. Martin's Press.score: 120.0
     
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  32. Quentin Smith (1994). Temporal Indexicals', In. L. Nathan Oaklander and Quentin Smith, Eds. In L. Nathan Oaklander & Quentin Smith (eds.), The New Theory of Time. Yale Up.score: 120.0
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  33. C. J. G. Wright, Barry C. Smith & Cynthia Macdonald (eds.) (2000). Knowing Our Own Minds. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
  34. C. Macdonald, Barry C. Smith & C. J. G. Wright (1998). Knowing Our Own Minds: Essays in Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    Self-knowledge is the focus of considerable attention from philosophers: Knowing Our Own Minds gives a much-needed overview of current work on the subject, bringing together new essays by leading figures. Knowledge of one's own sensations, desires, intentions, thoughts, beliefs, and other attitudes is characteristically different from other kinds of knowledge: it has greater immediacy, authority, and salience. The contributors examine philosophical questions raised by the distinctive character of self-knowledge, relating it to knowledge of other minds, to rationality and agency, externalist (...)
     
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  35. Alice MacLachlan (2010). Resentment and Moral Judgment in Smith and Butler. The Adam Smith Review 5:161-177.score: 21.0
    This paper is a discussion of the ‘moralization’ of resentment in Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments. By moralization, I do not refer to the complex process by which resentment is transformed by the machinations of sympathy, but a prior change in how the ‘raw material’ of the emotion itself is presented. In just over fifty pages, not only Smith’s attitude toward the passion of resentment, but also his very conception of the term, appears to shift dramatically. What (...)
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  36. Bence Nanay (2010). Adam Smith’s Concept of Sympathy and its Contemporary Interpretations. Adam Smith Review.score: 21.0
    Adam Smith’s account of sympathy or ‘fellow feeling’ has recently become exceedingly popular. It has been used as an antecedent of the concept of simulation: understanding, or attributing mental states to, other people by means of simulating them. It has also been singled out as the first correct account of empathy. Finally, to make things even more complicated, some of Smith’s examples for sympathy or ‘fellow feeling’ have been used as the earliest expression of emotional contagion. The aim (...)
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  37. Joshua Gert (2008). Michael Smith and the Rationality of Immoral Action. Journal of Ethics 12 (1):1 - 23.score: 18.0
    Although it goes against a widespread significant misunderstanding of his view, Michael Smith is one of the very few moral philosophers who explicitly wants to allow for the commonsense claim that, while morally required action is always favored by some reason, selfish and immoral action can also be rationally permissible. One point of this paper is to make it clear that this is indeed Smith’s view. It is a further point to show that his way of accommodating this (...)
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  38. P. Roger Turner (2012). Jesus' Return as Lottery Puzzle: A Reply to Donald Smith. Religious Studies 48 (3):305-313.score: 18.0
    In his recent article, ‘Lottery puzzles and Jesus’ return’, Donald Smith says that Christians should accept a very robust scepticism about the future because a Christian ought to think that the probability of Jesus’ return happening at any future moment is inscrutable to her. But I think that Smith’s argument lacks the power rationally to persuade Christians who are antecedently uncommitted as to whether or not we can or do have any substantive knowledge about the future. Moreover, I (...)
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  39. Paul Oslington (2012). God and the Market: Adam Smith's Invisible Hand. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):429 - 438.score: 18.0
    The invisible hand image is at the centre of contemporary debates about capacities of markets, on which discussion of many other topics in business ethics rests. However, its meaning in Adam Smith's writings remains obscure, particularly the religious associations that were obvious to early readers. He drew on Isaac Newton's theories of divine action and providence, mediated through the moderate Calvinism of the eighteenth century Scottish circles in which he moved. I argue within the context of Smith's general (...)
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  40. Arthur Fine (2009). Science Fictions: Comment on Godfrey-Smith. Philosophical Studies 143 (1):117 - 125.score: 18.0
    This is a comment on Peter Godfrey-Smith’s, “Models and Fictions in Science”. The comments explore problems he raises if we treat model systems as fictions in a naturalized and deflationary framework.
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  41. Geoff Cockfield, Ann Firth & John Laurent (eds.) (2007). New Perspectives on Adam Smith's the Theory of Moral Sentiments. Edward Elgar.score: 18.0
    1. Introduction Geoff Cockfield, Ann Firth and John Laurent -/- 2. The Role of Thumos in Adam Smith’s System Lisa Hill -/- 3. Adam Smith’s Treatment of the Greeks in The Theory of Moral Sentiments: The Case of Aristotle Richard Temple-Smith -/- 4. Adam Smith, Religion and the Scottish Enlightenment Pete Clarke -/- 5. The ‘New View’ of Adam Smith and the Development of his Views Over Time James E. Alvey -/- 6. The Moon Before (...)
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  42. Christopher Rowe (2012). Socrates on Reason, Appetite and Passion: A Response to Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith, Socratic Moral Psychology. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 16 (3):305-324.score: 18.0
    Section 1 of this essay distinguishes between four interpretations of Socratic intellectualism, which are, very roughly: (1) a version in which on any given occasion desire, and then action, is determined by what we think will turn out best for us, that being what we all, always, really desire; (2) a version in which on any given occasion action is determined by what we think will best satisfy our permanent desire for what is really best for us; (3) a version (...)
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  43. George Bragues (2009). Adam Smith's Vision of the Ethical Manager. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):447 - 460.score: 18.0
    Smith's famous invocation of the invisible hand -according to which self-interest promotes the greater good — has popularly been seen as a fundamental challenge to business ethics, a field committed to the opposite premise that the public interest cannot be advanced unless economic egoism is restrained by a more socially conscious mindset, one that takes into account the legitimate needs of stakeholders and the reciprocity inherent in networked relationships. Adam Smith has been brought into the discipline to show (...)
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  44. John W. McHugh (2011). Relaxing a Tension in Adam Smith's Account of Sympathy. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (2):189-204.score: 18.0
    This paper attempts to relax the tension between Adam Smith's claim that sympathy involves an evaluative act of imaginative projection and his claim that sympathy involves a non-evaluative act of imaginative identification. The first section locates the tension specifically in the two different ways Smith depicts the stance adopted by the sympathizer. The second section argues that we can relax this tension by finding an important role for a non-evaluative stance in Smith's normative account of moral evaluation. (...)
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  45. Vivienne Brown & Samuel Fleischacker (eds.) (2010). The Philosophy of Adam Smith: Essays Commemorating the 250th Anniversary of the Theory of Moral Sentiments. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The Philosophy of Adam Smith contains essays by some of the most prominent philosophers and scholars working on Adam Smith today. It is a special issue of The Adam Smith Review, commemorating the 250th anniversary of Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments. Introduction Part 1: Moral phenomenology 1. The virtue of TMS 1759 D.D. Raphael 2. The Theory of Moral Sentiments and the inner life Emma Rothschild 3. The standpoint of morality in Adam Smith and Hegel (...)
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  46. Richard Holton, Smith and Bigelow on the Muggletonians.score: 18.0
    In (Holton 1996) I argued that the account of value that Michael Smith has offered was vulnerable to a counter-example in the person of the Muggletonians. Smith argued, roughly, that what one values is what one would desire if one were fully rational. I objected that the Muggletonians held the path of Reason to be the path to evil. According to them, a fully rational person would have their desires so corrupted that they would become, quite literally, Satan. (...)
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  47. Scott L. Newbert (2003). Realizing the Spirit and Impact of Adam Smith's Capitalism Through Entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):251 - 261.score: 18.0
    Adam Smith argued in The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments that in order to create an effective and productive capitalist system, individuals must pursue interests of both the self and society. Despite this assertion, modern economic theory has become tightly focused on the pursuit of economic self-interests at the expense of other, higher order motives. This paper will argue that the tendency to employ such an egocentric strategy often generates externalities and inequalities that serve (...)
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  48. Jack Russell Weinstein (2012). Overlapping Consensus or Marketplace of Religions? Rawls and Smith. Philosophia 40 (2):223-236.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I examine the claim that Rawls’s overlapping consensus is too narrow to allow most mainstream religions’ participation in political discourse. I do so by asking whether religious exclusion is a consequence of belief or action, using conversion as a paradigm case. After concluding that this objection to Rawls is, in fact, defensible, and that the overlapping consensus excludes both religious belief and action, I examine an alternative approach to managing religious pluralism as presented by Adam Smith. (...)
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  49. Mary C. MacLeod & Peter K. Schotch (2000). Remarks on the Modal Logic of Henry Bradford Smith. Journal of Philosophical Logic 29 (6):603-615.score: 18.0
    H. B. Smith, Professor of Philosophy at the influential 'Pennsylvania School' was (roughly) a contemporary of C. I. Lewis who was similarly interested in a proper account of 'implication'. His research also led him into the study of modal logic but in a different direction than Lewis was led. His account of modal logic does not lend itself as readily as Lewis' to the received 'possible worlds' semantics, so that the Smith approach was a casualty rather than a (...)
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  50. Jill A. Brown & William R. Forster (2013). CSR and Stakeholder Theory: A Tale of Adam Smith. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):301-312.score: 18.0
    This article leverages insights from the body of Adam Smith’s work, including two lesser-known manuscripts—the Theory of Moral Sentiments and Lectures in Jurisprudence —to help answer the question as to how companies should morally prioritize corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives and stakeholder claims. Smith makes philosophical distinctions between justice and beneficence and perfect and imperfect rights, and we leverage those distinctions to speak to contemporary CSR and stakeholder management theories. We address the often-neglected question as to how far (...)
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