Search results for 'Thermodynamics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Newton C. A. Da Costa & Adonai S. Sant'Anna (2002). Time in Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 32 (11):1785-1796.score: 24.0
    We use Padoa's principle of independence of primitive symbols in axiomatic systems in order to show that time is dispensable in continuum thermodynamics, according to the axiomatic formulation of Gurtin and Williams. We also show how to define time by means of the remaining primitive concepts of Gurtin and Williams system. Finally, we introduce thermodynamics without time as a primitive concept.
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  2. Kinjalk Lochan, Seema Satin & Tejinder P. Singh (2012). Statistical Thermodynamics for a Non-Commutative Special Relativity: Emergence of a Generalized Quantum Dynamics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 42 (12):1556-1572.score: 24.0
    There ought to exist a description of quantum field theory which does not depend on an external classical time. To achieve this goal, in a recent paper we have proposed a non-commutative special relativity in which space-time and matter degrees of freedom are treated as classical matrices with arbitrary commutation relations, and a space-time line element is defined using a trace. In the present paper, following the theory of Trace Dynamics, we construct a statistical thermodynamics for the non-commutative special (...)
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  3. Arundhati Das, Surajit Chattopadhyay & Ujjal Debnath (2012). Validity of the Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics in the Logamediate and Intermediate Scenarios of the Universe. Foundations of Physics 42 (2):266-283.score: 24.0
    In this work, we have investigated the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in logamediate and intermediate scenarios of the universe bounded by the Hubble, apparent, particle and event horizons using and without using first law of thermodynamics. We have observed that the GSL is valid for Hubble, apparent, particle and event horizons of the universe in the logamediate scenario of the universe using first law and without using first law. Similarly the GSL is valid for (...)
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  4. D. P. Sheehan (2007). The Second Law of Thermodynamics: Foundations and Status. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1653-1658.score: 24.0
    Over the last 10–15 years the second law of thermodynamics has undergone unprecedented scrutiny, particularly with respect to its universal status. This brief article introduces the proceedings of a recent symposium devoted to this topic, The second law of thermodynamics: Foundations and Status, held at University of San Diego as part of the 87th Annual Meeting of the Pacific Division of the AAAS (June 19–22, 2006). The papers are introduced under three themes: ideal gases, quantum perspectives, and interpretation. (...)
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  5. Ted Jacobson & Aron C. Wall (2010). Black Hole Thermodynamics and Lorentz Symmetry. Foundations of Physics 40 (8):1076-1080.score: 24.0
    Recent developments point to a breakdown in the generalized second law of thermodynamics for theories with Lorentz symmetry violation. It appears possible to construct a perpetual motion machine of the second kind in such theories, using a black hole to catalyze the conversion of heat to work. Here we describe and extend the arguments leading to that conclusion. We suggest the inference that local Lorentz symmetry may be an emergent property of the macroscopic world with origins in a microscopic (...)
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  6. Ioannis E. Antoniou (2002). Caratheodory and the Foundations of Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics. Foundations of Physics 32 (4):627-641.score: 24.0
    Constantin Caratheodory offered the first systematic and contradiction free formulation of thermodynamics on the basis of his mathematical work on Pfaff forms. Moreover, his work on measure theory provided the basis for later improved formulations of thermodynamics and physics of continua where extensive variables are measures and intensive variables are densities. Caratheodory was the first to see that measure theory and not topology is the natural tool to understand the difficulties (ergodicity, approach to equilibrium, irreversibility) in the Foundations (...)
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  7. Joseph Katz (2003). Thermodynamics of Self-Gravitating Systems. Foundations of Physics 33 (2):223-269.score: 24.0
    This work assembles some basic theoretical elements on thermal equilibrium, stability conditions, and fluctuation theory in self-gravitating systems illustrated with a few examples. Thermodynamics deals with states that have settled down after sufficient time has gone by. Time dependent phenomena are beyond the scope of this paper. While thermodynamics is firmly rooted in statistical physics, equilibrium configurations, stability criteria and the destabilizing effect of fluctuations are all expressed in terms of thermodynamic functions. The work is not a review (...)
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  8. Harold J. Morowitz (1987). The Mind Body Problem and the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Biology and Philosophy 2 (3):271-275.score: 24.0
    Cartesian mind body dualism and modern versions of this viewpoint posit a mind thermodynamically unrelated to the body but informationally interactive. The relation between information and entropy developed by Leon Brillouin demonstrates that any information about the state of a system has entropic consequences. It is therefore impossible to dissociate the mind's information from the body's entropy. Knowledge of that state of the system without an energetically significant measurement would lead to a violation of the second law of thermodynamics.
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  9. Wayne C. Myrvold (2011). Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics: A Maxwellian View. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 42 (4):237-243.score: 24.0
    One finds, in Maxwell's writings on thermodynamics and statistical physics, a conception of the nature of these subjects that differs in interesting ways from the way that they are usually conceived. In particular, though—in agreement with the currently accepted view—Maxwell maintains that the second law of thermodynamics, as originally conceived, cannot be strictly true, the replacement he proposes is different from the version accepted by most physicists today. The modification of the second law accepted by most physicists is (...)
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  10. Vefa Karatay & Yagmur Denizhan (2005). In Search of a Reconciliation Between Semiotics, Thermodynamics and Metasystem Transition Theory. Axiomathes 15 (1):47-61.score: 24.0
    The disciplines of cybernetics, semiotics and thermodynamics investigate evolutionary processes quite independently from each other. The aim of this paper is to draw the parallels and point out the possibility and necessity of a reconciliation between these disciplines. The concept of metasystem transition has been proposed by Turchin as a quantum of evolution from a cybernetic point of view. Semiotic processes are of prime importance for the realisation of metasystem transitions in the course of evolution. From a thermodynamic (...)
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  11. Lionel Johnson (1992). An Ecological Approach to Biosystem Thermodynamics. Biology and Philosophy 7 (1):35-60.score: 24.0
    The general attributes of ecosystems are examined and a naturally occurring reference ecosystem is established, comparable with the isolated system of classical thermodynamics. Such an autonomous system with a stable, periodic input of energy is shown to assume certain structural characteristics that have an identifiable thermodynamic basis. Individual species tend to assume a state of least dissipation; this is most clearly evident in the dominant species (the species with the best integration of energy acquisition and conservation). It is concluded (...)
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  12. Janet Anders, Michal Hajdušek, Damian Markham & Vlatko Vedral (2008). How Much of One-Way Computation Is Just Thermodynamics? Foundations of Physics 38 (6):506-522.score: 22.0
    In this paper we argue that one-way quantum computation can be seen as a form of phase transition with the available information about the solution of the computation being the order parameter. We draw a number of striking analogies between standard thermodynamical quantities such as energy, temperature, work, and corresponding computational quantities such as the amount of entanglement, time, potential capacity for computation, respectively. Aside from being intuitively pleasing, this picture allows us to make novel conjectures, such as an estimate (...)
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  13. O. B. Zaslavskii (2003). Regular Self-Consistent Geometries with Infinite Quantum Backreaction in 2D Dilaton Gravity and Black Hole Thermodynamics: Unfamiliar Features of Familiar Models. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 33 (1):1-35.score: 22.0
    We analyze the rather unusual properties of some exact solutions in 2D dilaton gravity for which infinite quantum stresses on the Killing horizon can be compatible with regularity of the geometry. In particular, the Boulware state can support a regular horizon. We show that such solutions are contained in some well-known exactly solvable models (for example, RST). Formally, they appear to account for an additional coefficient B in the solutions (for the same Lagrangian which contains also “traditional” solutions) that gives (...)
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  14. T. L. Duncan & J. S. Semura (2007). Information Loss as a Foundational Principle for the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1767-1773.score: 21.0
    In a previous paper (Duncan, T.L., Semura, J.S. in Entropy 6:21, 2004) we considered the question, “What underlying property of nature is responsible for the second law?” A simple answer can be stated in terms of information: The fundamental loss of information gives rise to the second law. This line of thinking highlights the existence of two independent but coupled sets of laws: Information dynamics and energy dynamics. The distinction helps shed light on certain foundational questions in statistical mechanics. For (...)
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  15. Richard Chace Tolman (1934). Relativity, Thermodynamics and Cosmology. Oxford, the Clarendon Press.score: 21.0
    A distinguished American physicist and teacher delivers a landmark study thatdevelops three essential scientific themes on each subject.
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  16. Larry R. Vandervert (1991). On the Modeling of Emergent Interaction: Which Will It Be, the Laws of Thermodynamics or Sperry's "Wheel" in the Subcircuitry? Journal of Mind and Behavior 12 (4):535-39.score: 21.0
     
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  17. J. Dunn (2011). Fried Eggs, Thermodynamics, and the Special Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):71-98.score: 18.0
    David Lewis ([1986b]) gives an attractive and familiar account of counterfactual dependence in the standard context. This account has recently been subject to a counterexample from Adam Elga ([2000]). In this article, I formulate a Lewisian response to Elga’s counterexample. The strategy is to add an extra criterion to Lewis’s similarity metric, which determines the comparative similarity of worlds. This extra criterion instructs us to take special science laws into consideration as well as fundamental laws. I argue that the Second (...)
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  18. Domenico Giulini, On the Statistical Viewpoint Concerning the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics - OR - a Reminder on the Ehrenfests' Urm Model.score: 18.0
    In statistical thermodynamics the 2nd law is properly spelled out in terms of conditioned probabilities. As such it makes the statement, that `entropy increases with time' without preferring a time direction. In this paper we try to explain this statement---which is well known since the time of the Ehrenfests---in some detail within a systematic Bayesian approach.
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  19. Jill North (2011). Time in Thermodynamics. In Criag Callender (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oxford. 312--350.score: 18.0
    Or better: time asymmetry in thermodynamics. Better still: time asymmetry in thermodynamic phenomena. “Time in thermodynamics” misleadingly suggests that thermodynamics will tell us about the fundamental nature of time. But we don’t think that thermodynamics is a fundamental theory. It is a theory of macroscopic behavior, often called a “phenomenological science.” And to the extent that physics can tell us about the fundamental features of the world, including such things as the nature of time, we generally (...)
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  20. George N. Hatsopoulos & Elias P. Gyftopoulos (1976). A Unified Quantum Theory of Mechanics and Thermodynamics. Part III. Irreducible Quantal Dispersions. Foundations of Physics 6 (5):561-570.score: 18.0
    This part of the paper concludes the presentation of the unified theory. It is shown that the theory requires the existence of, and applies only to, irreducible quantal dispersions associated with pure or mixed states. Two experimental procedures are given for the operational verification of such dispersions. Because the existence of irreducible dispersions associated with mixed states is required by Postulate 4 of the theory, and because Postulate 4 expresses the basic implications of the second law of classical thermodynamics, (...)
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  21. George N. Hatsopoulos & Elias P. Gyftopoulos (1976). A Unified Quantum Theory of Mechanics and Thermodynamics. Part I. Postulates. Foundations of Physics 6 (1):15-31.score: 18.0
    A unified axiomatic theory that embraces both mechanics and thermodynamics is presented in three parts. It is based on four postulates; three are taken from quantum mechanics, and the fourth is the new disclosure of the existence of quantum states that are stable (Part I). For nonequilibrium and equilibrium states, the theory provides general original results, such as the relation between irreducible density operators and the maximum work that can be extracted adiabatically (Part IIa). For stable equilibrium states, it (...)
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  22. Peter L. Kellerman (1980). Heat Flow in Relativistic Equilibrium Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 10 (1-2):163-173.score: 18.0
    An attempt is made to clarify a thought experiment introduced by P. T. Landsberg concerning the relativistic heat flow between bodies in relative motion. It is shown that if the problem is analyzed within the covariant thermodynamics developed by R. Balescu, supplemented by the second law of thermodynamics as proposed here, then such heat flow considerations do not fix the transformation of temperature as Landsberg contends. Instead, the transformation of temperature is left as being purely a matter of (...)
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  23. Herbert Callen (1974). Thermodynamics as a Science of Symmetry. Foundations of Physics 4 (4):423-443.score: 18.0
    A new interpretation of thermodynamics is advanced; thermodynamics is the study of those properties of macroscopic matter that follow from the symmetry properties of physical laws, mediated through the statistics of large systems.
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  24. H. A. Buchdahl (1979). From Phenomenological Thermodynamics to the Canonical Ensemble. Foundations of Physics 9 (11-12):819-829.score: 18.0
    Given the generic canonical probability in phase φ=exp[β(Ψ-H)], contact is traditionally made with phenomenological thermodynamics by comparing the identity δ〈φ〉=0 with the relationTδS=δU+δW, δ indicating an arbitrary infinitesimal variation of the thermodynamic coordinates and angular brackets ensemble means. This paper is concerned with the inverse problem of finding both the generic form of the phase functionw such thatS=〈w〉 and the explicit form φ=αexp[(F-H)/kT] of the canonical distribution on the basis of the requirement that the consequences of the phenomenological laws (...)
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  25. Horst-Heino von Borzeszkowski & Renate Wahsner (1984). Did Nonlinear Irreversible Thermodynamics Revolutionize the Classical Time Conception of Physics? Foundations of Physics 14 (7):653-670.score: 18.0
    From both physical and epistemological viewpoints, the following theses, which nowadays are often discussed in the literature, are examined: Nonlinear thermodynamics renders it possible to grasp evolutionary physical processes; for thermodynamics it introduces, instead of idealized reversible time, a directed time into physics; thus a science is established that is nearer to reality than classical physics. To analyze these theses, the relation of thermodynamics to dynamical physics is considered. In particular, it is demonstrated that, in classical as (...)
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  26. Harvey R. Brown & Jos Uffink (2001). The Origins of Time-Asymmetry in Thermodynamics: The Minus First Law. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):525-538.score: 18.0
    This paper investigates what the source of time-asymmetry is in thermodynamics, and comments on the question whether a time-symmetric formulation of the Second Law is possible.
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  27. Jos Uffink (2001). Bluff Your Way in the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (3):305-394.score: 18.0
    The aim of this article is to analyse the relation between the second law of thermodynamics and the so-called arrow of time. For this purpose, a number of different aspects in this arrow of time are distinguished, in particular those of time-reversal (non-)invariance and of (ir)reversibility. Next I review versions of the second law in the work of Carnot, Clausius, Kelvin, Planck, Gibbs, Caratheodory and Lieb and Yngvason, and investigate their connection with these aspects of the arrow of time. (...)
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  28. Josef-Maria Jauch (1975). Analytical Thermodynamics. Part I. Thermostatics—General Theory. Foundations of Physics 5 (1):111-132.score: 18.0
    A new axiomatic treatment of equilibrium thermodynamics—thermostatics—is presented. The equilibrium states of a thermal system are assumed to be represented by a differentiable manifold of dimensionn + 1 (n finite). The empirical temperature is defined by the notion of thermal equilibrium. Empirical entropy is shown to exist for all systems with the property that the total work delivered along closed adiabats is zero. Absolute entropy and temperature follow from the additivity of heat and energy for two separate systems in (...)
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  29. Gian Paolo Beretta (1987). Quantum Thermodynamics of Nonequilibrium. Onsager Reciprocity and Dispersion-Dissipation Relations. Foundations of Physics 17 (4):365-381.score: 18.0
    A generalized Onsager reciprocity theorem emerges as an exact consequence of the structure of the nonlinear equation of motion of quantum thermodynamics and is valid for all the dissipative nonequilibrium states, close and far from stable thermodynamic equilibrium, of an isolated system composed of a single constituent of matter with a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. In addition, a dispersion-dissipation theorem results in a precise relation between the generalized dissipative conductivity that describes the mutual interrelation between dissipative rates of a pair (...)
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  30. B. H. Lavenda (1975). Thermodynamics of Averaged Motion. Foundations of Physics 5 (4):573-589.score: 18.0
    The thermodynamics of averaged motion treats the asymptotic spatiotemporal evolution of nonlinear irreversible processes. Dissipative and conservative actions are associated with short and long spatiotemporal scales, respectively. The motion of asymptotically stable systems is slow, monotonic, and continuous, so that the microscopic state variable description of rapid motion can be supplanted by an analysis of the macroscopic variable equations of motion of amplitude and phase. Rapid motion is associated with instability, and the direction of system motion is determined by (...)
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  31. J. M. Jauch (1972). On a New Foundation of Equilibrium Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 2 (4):327-332.score: 18.0
    This paper presents a new foundation of equilibrium thermodynamics based on certain ideas of T. Ehrenfest. The main result is the proof for the existence of entropy as a consequence of the conservation of energy for conservative thermal systems.
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  32. B. H. Lavenda (1972). Concepts of Stability and Symmetry in Irreversible Thermodynamics. I. Foundations of Physics 2 (2-3):161-179.score: 18.0
    Concepts of stability and symmetry in irreversible thermodynamics are developed through the analysis of system energy flows. The excess power function, derived from a local energy conservation equation, is shown to yield necessary and sufficient stability criteria for linear and nonlinear irreversible processes. In the absence of symmetry-destroying external forces, the linear range may be characterized by a set of phenomenological coefficient symmetries relating coupled forces and displacements, velocities, and accelerations, whereas rotational phenomena in nonlinear processes may be characterized (...)
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  33. Abhas Mitra (2011). Macroscopic Form of the First Law of Thermodynamics for an Adibatically Evolving Non-Singular Self-Gravitating Fluid. Foundations of Physics 41 (9):1454-1461.score: 18.0
    We emphasize that the pressure related work appearing in a general relativistic first law of thermodynamics should involve proper volume element rather than coordinate volume element. This point is highlighted by considering both local energy momentum conservation equation as well as particle number conservation equation. It is also emphasized that we are considering here a non-singular fluid governed by purely classical general relativity. Therefore, we are not considering here any semi-classical or quantum gravity which apparently suggests thermodynamical properties even (...)
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  34. S. L. Miller (2007). Insights Into the Second Law of Thermodynamics From Anisotropic Gas-Surface Interactions. Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1660-1684.score: 18.0
    Thermodynamic implications of anisotropic gas-surface interactions in a closed molecular flow cavity are examined. Anisotropy at the microscopic scale, such as might be caused by reduced-dimensionality surfaces, is shown to lead to reversibility at the macroscopic scale. The possibility of a self-sustaining nonequilibrium stationary state induced by surface anisotropy is demonstrated that simultaneously satisfies flux balance, conservation of momentum, and conservation of energy. Conversely, it is also shown that the second law of thermodynamics prohibits anisotropic gas-surface interactions in “equilibrium”, (...)
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  35. Meir Hemmo & Orly Shenker (2001). Can We Explain Thermodynamics By Quantum Decoherence? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):555-568.score: 18.0
    Can we explain the laws of thermodynamics, in particular the irreversible increase of entropy, from the underlying quantum mechanical dynamics? Attempts based on classical dynamics have all failed. Albert (1994a,b; 2000) proposed a way to recover thermodynamics on a purely dynamical basis, using the quantum theory of the collapse of the wavefunction of Ghirardi, Rimini and Weber (1986). In this paper we propose an alternative way to explain thermodynamics within no-collapse interpretations of quantum mechanics. Our approach relies (...)
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  36. Jill North (2002). What is the Problem About the Time-Asymmetry of Thermodynamics?--A Reply to Price. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (1):121-136.score: 18.0
    Huw Price argues that there are two conceptions of the puzzle of the time-asymmetry of thermodynamics. He thinks this puzzle has remained unsolved for so long partly due to a misunderstanding about which of these conceptions is the right one and what form a solution ought to take. I argue that it is Price's understanding of the problem which is mistaken. Further, it is on the basis of this and other misunderstandings that he disparages a type of account which (...)
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  37. Sang Wook Yi (2003). Reduction of Thermodynamics: A Few Problems. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1028-1038.score: 18.0
    Lawrence Sklar in his book, Physics and Chance (1993), proposes a sophisticated account of reduction of thermodynamics (TD) by statistical mechanics (SM). I argue that Sklar's analysis of the alleged reduction of TD by SM is problematic in several respects. I consider a few counterexamples to show that none of what Sklar takes to be the central features of successful reduction in science (unification and identification) holds in the case of TD and SM. I suggest the broader conclusion that (...)
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  38. Craig Callender (2001). Taking Thermodynamics Too Seriously. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):539-553.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the mistake of understanding the laws and concepts of thermodynamics too literally in the foundations of statistical mechanics. Arguing that this error is still made in subtle ways, the article explores its occurrence in three examples: the Second Law, the concept of equilibrium and the definition of phase transitions.
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  39. Stathis Psillos (1994). A Philosophical Study of the Transition From the Caloric Theory of Heat to Thermodynamics: Resisting the Pessimistic Meta-Induction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (2):159-190.score: 18.0
    I began this study with Laudan's argument from the pessimistic induction and I promised to show that the caloric theory of heat cannot be used to support the premisses of the meta-induction on past scientific theories. I tried to show that the laws of experimental calorimetry, adiabatic change and Carnot's theory of the motive power of heat were (i) independent of the assumption that heat is a material substance, (ii) approximately true, (iii) deducible and accounted for within thermodynamics. I (...)
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  40. Jeffrey Bub (2001). Maxwell's Demon and the Thermodynamics of Computation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):569-579.score: 18.0
    It is generally accepted, following Landauer and Bennett, that the process of measurement involves no minimum entropy cost, but the erasure of information in resetting the memory register of a computer to zero requires dissipating heat into the environment. This thesis has been challenged recently in a two-part article by Earman and Norton. I review some relevant observations in the thermodynamics of computation and argue that Earman and Norton are mistaken: there is in principle no entropy cost to the (...)
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  41. Jeffrey S. Wicken (1981). Causal Explanations in Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):65-77.score: 18.0
    This paper considers the problem of causal explanation in classical and statistical thermodynamics. It is argued that the irreversibility of macroscopic processes is explained in both formulations of thermodynamics in a teleological way that appeals to entropic or probabilistic consequences rather than to efficient-causal, antecedental conditions. This explanatory structure of thermodynamics is not taken to imply a teleological orientation to macroscopic processes themselves, but to reflect simply the epistemological limitations of this science, wherein consequences of heat-work asymmetries (...)
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  42. John D. Norton (2014). The End of the Thermodynamics of Computation: A No-Go Result. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):1182-1192.score: 18.0
    The thermodynamics of computation assumes that computational processes at the molecular level can be brought arbitrarily close to thermodynamic reversibility and that thermodynamic entropy creation is unavoidable only in data erasure or the merging of computational paths, in accord with Landauer’s principle. The no-go result shows that fluctuations preclude completion of thermodynamically reversible processes. Completion can be achieved only by irreversible processes that create thermodynamic entropy in excess of the Landauer limit.
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  43. Jerome Rothstein (1964). Thermodynamics and Some Undecidable Physical Questions. Philosophy of Science 31 (1):40-48.score: 18.0
    It is shown that a number of questions, usually considered philosophical rather than scientific, can be reformulated to apply to a world of automata or "well-informed heat engines." In some cases they admit of physical answers, but in many cases obtaining answers entails violation of the second law of thermodynamics. This is demonstrated explicitly for the problem of determinism and free will, for the discovery of the origin or ultimate fate of the universe, or for the discovery of causes (...)
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  44. Sang Wook Yi, Reduction of Thermodynamics.score: 18.0
    This paper aims: (1) to show that Lawrence Sklar`s recent attempt to reduce thermodynamics(TD) to statistical mechanics(SM) is fallacious in several respects; and (2) to suggest a broader conclusion that a more useful way of understanding the relationship between TD and SM is as collaboration and competition among alternative methodologies rather than reduction of one theory to another. To argue for (1), I discuss two cases (the distinction of intensive/extensive variables in TD and the existence of phase transitions) where (...)
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  45. Daniel R. Brooks & Richard T. O'Grady (1986). Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics and Different Axioms of Evolution. Acta Biotheoretica 35 (1-2).score: 18.0
    Proponents of two axioms of biological evolutionary theory have attempted to find justification by reference to nonequilibrium thermodynamics. One states that biological systems and their evolutionary diversification are physically improbable states and transitions, resulting from a selective process; the other asserts that there is an historically constrained inherent directionality in evolutionary dynamics, independent of natural selection, which exerts a self-organizing influence. The first, the Axiom of Improbability, is shown to be nonhistorical and thus, for a theory of change through (...)
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  46. R. H., Uffink &Unknown & J. (2001). The Origins of Time-Asymmetry in Thermodynamics: The Minus First Law. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (4):525-538.score: 18.0
    This paper investigates what the source of time asymmetry is in thermodynamics, and comments on the question whether a time-symmetric formulation of the Second Law is possible.
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  47. Normand M. Laurendeau (2011). An Energy Primer: From Thermodynamics to Theology. Zygon 46 (4):890-914.score: 18.0
    Abstract Scientific, technological, ethical, and religious issues confronting the human prospect are emerging as we encounter the inevitable shift from fossil to renewable fuels. In particular, we are entering a period of monumental transition with respect to both the forms and use of energy. As for any technological transition of this magnitude, ultimate success will require good ethics and religion, as well as good science and technology. Economic and political issues associated with energy conservation and renewable energies are arising in (...)
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  48. Peter R. Wills (2014). Genetic Information, Physical Interpreters and Thermodynamics; The Material-Informatic Basis of Biosemiosis. Biosemiotics 7 (1):141-165.score: 18.0
    The sequence of nucleotide bases occurring in an organism’s DNA is often regarded as a codescript for its construction. However, information in a DNA sequence can only be regarded as a codescript relative to an operational biochemical machine, which the information constrains in such a way as to direct the process of construction. In reality, any biochemical machine for which a DNA codescript is efficacious is itself produced through the mechanical interpretation of an identical or very similar codescript. In these (...)
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  49. John H. Harris (1982). The Apparent Inconsistency of Moulines' Treatment of Equilibrium Thermodynamics. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:304 - 311.score: 18.0
    Moulines in his "A Logical Reconstruction of Simple Equilibrium Thermodynamics" shows that Sneedian constraints play an essential role even in the purely theoretical development of the mathematical formalism of at least one actual scientific theory. However, Moulines' treatment is apparently inconsistent because of the way he represents constraints. A very simple non-Sneedian way of representing constraints is given which removes the difficulty.
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  50. J. Scott Turner (2012). The Thermodynamics of Life. Metascience 21 (2):371-373.score: 18.0
    The thermodynamics of life Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9651-8 Authors J. Scott Turner, SUNY, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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