Search results for 'Thinking thing' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  38
    Larry Hauser (1993). Why Isn't My Pocket Calculator a Thinking Thing? Minds and Machines 3 (1):3-10.
    My pocket calculator (Cal) has certain arithmetical abilities: it seems Cal calculates. That calculating is thinking seems equally untendentious. Yet these two claims together provide premises for a seemingly valid syllogism whose conclusion -- Cal thinks -- most would deny. I consider several ways to avoid this conclusion, and find them mostly wanting. Either we ourselves can't be said to think or calculate if our calculation-like performances are judged by the standards proposed to rule out Cal; or the standards (...)
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  2.  16
    Stefan Gruner (2008). Comments on 'How Would You Know If You Synthesized a Thinking Thing'. Minds and Machines 18 (1):107-120.
    In their Minds and Machines essay How would you know if you synthesized a Thinking Thing? (Kary & Mahner, Minds and Machines, 12(1), 61–86, 2002), Kary and Mahner have chosen to occupy a high ground of materialism and empiricism from which to attack the philosophical and methodological positions of believers in artificial intelligence (AI) and artificial life (AL). In this review I discuss some of their main arguments as well as their philosophical foundations. Their central argument: ‘AI is (...)
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  3.  75
    Michael Kary & Martin Mahner (2002). How Would You Know If You Synthesized a Thinking Thing? Minds and Machines 12 (1):61-86.
    We confront the following popular views: that mind or life are algorithms; that thinking, or more generally any process other than computation, is computation; that anything other than a working brain can have thoughts; that anything other than a biological organism can be alive; that form and function are independent of matter; that sufficiently accurate simulations are just as genuine as the real things they imitate; and that the Turing test is either a necessary or sufficient or scientific procedure (...)
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  4. William J. Rapaport (1993). Because Mere Calculating Isn't Thinking: Comments on Hauser's Why Isn't My Pocket Calculator a Thinking Thing?. Minds and Machines 3 (1):11-20.
  5. Nuno P. Monteiro (2012). We Can Never Study Merely One Thing: Reflections on Systems Thinking and IR. Critical Review 24 (3):343-366.
    Robert Jervis's System Effects was published just as systems thinking began to decline among political scientists, who were adopting increasingly strict standards of causal identification, privileging experimental and large-N studies. Many politically consequential system effects are not amenable to research designs that meet these standards, yet they must nonetheless be studied if the most important questions of international politics are to be answered. For example, if nuclear weapons are considered in light of their effect on the international system as (...)
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  6. Cora Kaplan (1996). 'A Heterogeneous Thing': Female Childhood and the Rise of Racial Thinking in Victorian Britain. In Diana Fuss (ed.), Human, All Too Human. Routledge 169--202.
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  7.  56
    Joshua L. Watson (2016). Thinking Animals and the Thinking Parts Problem. Philosophical Quarterly 66 (263):323-340.
    There is a thinking animal in your chair and you are the only thinking thing in your chair; therefore, you are an animal. So goes the main argument for animalism, the Thinking Animal Argument. But notice that there are many other things that might do our thinking: heads, brains, upper halves, left-hand complements, right-hand complements, and any other object that has our brain as a part. The abundance of candidates for the things that do our (...)
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  8.  28
    Felipe De Brigard (2014). Is Memory for Remembering? Recollection as a Form of Episodic Hypothetical Thinking. Synthese 191 (2):1-31.
    Misremembering is a systematic and ordinary occurrence in our daily lives. Since it is commonly assumed that the function of memory is to remember the past, misremembering is typically thought to happen because our memory system malfunctions. In this paper I argue that not all cases of misremembering are due to failures in our memory system. In particular, I argue that many ordinary cases of misremembering should not be seen as instances of memory’s malfunction, but rather as the normal result (...)
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  9.  2
    Qingjie James Wang (2016). Thing-Ing and No-Thing in Heidegger, Kant, and Laozi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):159-174.
    Thing” and “nothing” are metaphysical themes of thinking for major philosophers both in the West and in East Asia, such as Heidegger, Kant, and Laozi 老子. In light of a discussion of Heidegger’s understanding of thing-ing and no-thing and of his critical interpretation of Kant on the same issue, I shall in this essay reconstruct a Laozian theory of thing and nothing. My conclusion is that thing and nothing are not two “things,” as often (...)
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  10.  30
    Ilyas Altuner (2011). Transition From Doubt to Knowledge and Comprehension of the Mind Itself in Descartes’ Philosophy. Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):94-109.
    Descartes uses skepticism as a method in the search for truth and afterwards he arrives at the knowledge of truth by conception cogito, which is an intuitive proposition. Comprehension of the mind itself is asserted from which ego cannot be cut from thinking, and this conception is based on the existence of God who does exist to be contained in the mind conceptually. God is stated the most perfect being which does rescue mind from doubt and show its real (...)
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  11. Michael Neu (2011). Why There is No Such Thing as Just War Pacifism and Why Just War Theorists and Pacifists Can Talk Nonetheless. Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):413-433.
    Can just war theory and pacifism be substantially reconciled in theory and practice? In this paper I argue that James Sterba is mistaken in thinking that they can. There is no such thing as just war pacifism. However, this does not mean that just war theorists and pacifists cannot have a reasonable conversation about the justifiability of war. They can have such a conversation if they overcome their exclusive concern with the question of action-guidingness, that is, the binary (...)
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  12.  13
    Katharine V. Smith & Nelda S. Godfrey (2002). Being a Good Nurse and Doing the Right Thing: A Qualitative Study. Nursing Ethics 9 (3):301-312.
    Despite an abundance of theoretical literature on virtue ethics in nursing and health care, very little research has been carried out to support or refute the claims made. One such claim is that ethical nursing is what happens when a good nurse does the right thing. The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study was therefore to examine nurses’ perceptions of what it means to be a good nurse and to do the right thing. Fifty-three nurses responded to two (...)
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  13.  3
    Daniele Sgaravatti (2016). Is Knowledge of Essence Required for Thinking About Something? Dialectica 70 (2):217-228.
    Lowe claims that having knowledge of the essence of an object is a precondition for thinking about it. Lowe supports this claim with roughly the following argument: you cannot think about something unless you know what you are thinking about; and to know what it is that you are thinking about just is to know its essence. I will argue that this line of reasoning fails because of an equivocation in the expression ‘what a thing is’, (...)
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  14. Gregory R. Peterson (2003). Being Conscious of Marc Bekoff: Thinking of Animal Self-Consciousness. Zygon 38 (2):247-256.
    The preceding article by Marc Bekoff reveals much about our current understanding of animal self-consciousness and its implications. It also reveals how much more there is to be said and considered. This response briefly examines animal self-consciousness from scientific, moral, and theological perspectives. As Bekoff emphasizes, self-consciousness is not one thing but many. Consequently, our moral relationship to animals is not simply one based on a graded hierarchy of abilities. Furthermore, the complexity of animal self-awareness can serve as stimulus (...)
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  15.  70
    Dale Jacquette (2007). Schopenhauer's Proof That Thing-in-Itself is Will. Kantian Review 12 (2):76-108.
    In a bold series of pronouncements, Arthur Schopenhauer maintains that the Kantian thing-in-itself is Will. The division between the world as Will and representation, with its impressive array of implications, is Schopenhauer's most important and distinctive contribution to metaphysics. To understand what Schopenhauer means by ‘Will’ as opposed to the empirical ‘will’, and his reasons for identifying thing-in-itself with Will, we must look in detail at two related arguments by which Schopenhauer proposes to link these concepts. The arguments (...)
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  16.  63
    James H. Fetzer (1997). Thinking and Computing: Computers as Special Kinds of Signs. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 7 (3):345-364.
    Cognitive science has been dominated by the computational conception that cognition is computation across representations. To the extent to which cognition as computation across representations is supposed to be a purposive, meaningful, algorithmic, problem-solving activity, however, computers appear to be incapable of cognition. They are devices that can facilitate computations on the basis of semantic grounding relations as special kinds of signs. Even their algorithmic, problem-solving character arises from their interpretation by human users. Strictly speaking, computers as such — apart (...)
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  17.  80
    Robert A. Wilson, Review of Derek Melser, The Act of Thinking. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    This is a book that challenges the current orthodoxy, both in the philosophy of mind and in the cognitive sciences, that thinking (construed broadly to include perceiving, imagining, remembering, etc.) is a mental process in the head. Such a view has been largely taken for granted since the demise of behaviorism in the 1960s, and it underpins both the representational and computational theories of mind, including their connectionist and dynamicist variants. While the orthodoxy has been rejected in recent years (...)
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  18.  35
    Brayton Polka (2012). The Metaphysics of Thinking Necessary Existence: Kant and the Ontological Argument. The European Legacy 17 (5):583 - 591.
    I argue in my paper that, when the ?twofold standpoint,? in terms of which Kant undertakes to set metaphysics upon the revolutionary path of critical reason, is truly assessed, we discover that the fundamental distinction that he makes between subject and object, between thinking (together with desiring and willing) and knowing, between thinking the thing in itself and knowing objects of possible experience, or between freedom and nature, recapitulates the ontological argument demonstrating the necessary relationship between thought (...)
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  19.  55
    David Cole, Images and Thinking: Critique of Arguments Against Images as a Medium of Thought.
    The Way of Ideas died an ignoble death, committed to the flames by behaviorist empiricists. Ideas, pictures in the head, perished with the Way. By the time those empiricists were supplanted at the helm by functionalists and causal theorists, a revolution had taken place in linguistics and the last thing anyone wanted to do was revive images as the medium of thought. Currently, some but not all cognitive scientists think that there probably are mental images - experiments in cognitive (...)
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  20.  6
    Rudolf Arnheim (1980). A Plea for Visual Thinking. Critical Inquiry 6 (3):489-497.
    The habit of separating the intuitive from the abstractive functions, as they were called in the Middle Ages, goes far back in our tradition. Descartes, in the sixth Meditation, defined man as "a thing that thinks," to which reasoning came naturally; whereas imagining, the activity of the senses, required a special effort and was in no way necessary to the human nature or essence. The passive ability to receive images of sensory things, said Descartes, would be useless if there (...)
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  21.  41
    Marie-Eve Morin (2010). Thinking Things: Heidegger, Sartre, Nancy. Sartre Studies International 15 (2):35-53.
    This paper compares Sartre's and Nancy's experience of the plurality of beings. After briefly discussing why Heidegger cannot provide such an experience, it analyzes the relation between the in-itself and for-itself in Sartre and between bodies and sense in Nancy in order to ask how this experience can be nauseating for Sartre, but meaningful for Nancy. First, it shows that the articulation of Being into beings is only a coat of veneer for Sartre while for Nancy Being is necessarily plural. (...)
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  22.  7
    Isaac Linder (2013). Stage Notes and/as/or Track Changes: Introductory Remarks and Magical Thinking on Printing: An Election and a Provocation. Continent 2 (4):244-247.
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  23.  3
    Tereza-Brindusa Palade (2010). Why Thinking in Faith? A Reappraisal of Edith Stein's View of Reason. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 15 (2).
    This paper intends to question the conventional wisdom that philosophy should limit its endeavours to the horizon of modern transcendentalism, thus rejecting the presuppositions of faith. By reappraising Edith Stein’s views of faith and reason, which are also shared by the magisterial document of John Paul II, Fides et ratio, an argument for the possibility of “thinking in faith” is put forward. But why would it be important nowadays to engage in rational research in philosophy in a quest for (...)
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  24. John Benson (1974). Hog in Sloth, Fox in Stealth: Man and Beast in Moral Thinking: John Benson. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 8:265-280.
    Human beings find themselves sharing the world with a great variety of other animals. Besides using them in various ways, we think about them and compare ourselves with them, and it is hard to envisage the difference it would make to our understanding of ourselves if they were not there. For one thing we should not have the concept of the human species, and that human beings should be thought of, however theoretically, as all belonging to one species is (...)
     
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  25.  2
    Catherine A. Adams (2010). Teachers Building Dwelling Thinking with Slideware. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 10 (1).
    Teacher-student discourse is increasingly mediated through, by and with information and communication technologies: in-class discussions have found new, textually-rich venues online; chalk and whiteboard lectures are rapidly giving way to PowerPoint presentations. Yet, what does this mean experientially for teachers? This paper reports on a phenomenological study investigating teachers’ lived experiences of PowerPoint in post-secondary classrooms. As teachers become more informed about the affordances of information and communication technology like PowerPoint and consequently take up and use these tools in their (...)
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  26. Christopher Bennett (2015). What is This Thing Called Ethics? Routledge.
    What is morality? How do we define what is right and wrong? How does moral theory help us deal with ethical issues in the world around us? This second edition provides an engaging and stimulating introduction to philosophical thinking about morality. Christopher Bennett provides the reader with accessible examples of contemporary and relevant ethical problems, before looking at the main theoretical approaches and key philosophers associated with them. Topics covered include: life and death issues such as abortion and global (...)
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  27. Christopher Bennett (2015). What is This Thing Called Ethics? Routledge.
    What is morality? How do we define what is right and wrong? How does moral theory help us deal with ethical issues in the world around us? This second edition provides an engaging and stimulating introduction to philosophical thinking about morality. Christopher Bennett provides the reader with accessible examples of contemporary and relevant ethical problems, before looking at the main theoretical approaches and key philosophers associated with them. Topics covered include: life and death issues such as abortion and global (...)
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  28. Ian Bogost (2012). Alien Phenomenology, or What It's Like to Be a Thing. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Humanity has sat at the center of philosophical thinking for too long. The recent advent of environmental philosophy and posthuman studies has widened our scope of inquiry to include ecosystems, animals, and artificial intelligence. Yet the vast majority of the stuff in our universe, and even in our lives, remains beyond serious philosophical concern. In _Alien Phenomenology, or What It’s Like to Be a Thing_, Ian Bogost develops an object-oriented ontology that puts things at the center of being—a philosophy (...)
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  29.  2
    Ted Cohen (2012). Thinking of Others: On the Talent for Metaphor. Princeton University Press.
    In Thinking of Others, Ted Cohen argues that the ability to imagine oneself as another person is an indispensable human capacity--as essential to moral awareness as it is to literary appreciation--and that this talent for identification is the same as the talent for metaphor. To be able to see oneself as someone else, whether the someone else is a real person or a fictional character, is to exercise the ability to deal with metaphor and other figurative language. The underlying (...)
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  30. Ted Cohen (2008). Thinking of Others: On the Talent for Metaphor. Princeton University Press.
    In Thinking of Others, Ted Cohen argues that the ability to imagine oneself as another person is an indispensable human capacity--as essential to moral awareness as it is to literary appreciation--and that this talent for identification is the same as the talent for metaphor. To be able to see oneself as someone else, whether the someone else is a real person or a fictional character, is to exercise the ability to deal with metaphor and other figurative language. The underlying (...)
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  31. Andrew John Mitchell (2001). The Fourfold and Technology: Heidegger's Thinking of Limit. Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    In this work, I attempt a four-part task: to explicate Heidegger's notion of the Fourfold, to show its necessary relation to technology, to think the limit that separates these, and to show how this constellation of the Fourfold and technology escapes from the "metaphysics of presence" with which Heidegger has been charged. ;1. The Fourfold is the belonging together of Earth, Sky, Mortals, and Divinities. Heidegger inherits the components from Holderlin, but transforms then in his thought. The gathering of these (...)
     
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  32. Greg Moses & Gail Presbey (eds.) (2014). Peace Philosophy and Public Life: Commitments, Crises, and Concepts for Engaged Thinking. Editions Rodopi.
    To a world assaulted by private interests, this book argues that peace must be a public thing. Distinguished philosophers of peace have always worked publicly for public results. Opposing nuclear proliferation, organizing communities of the disinherited, challenging violence within status quo establishments, such are the legacies of truly engaged philosophers of peace. This volume remembers those legacies, reviews the promise of critical thinking for crises today, and expands the free range of thinking needed to create more mindful (...)
     
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  33. William Rothman (2014). Must We Kill the Thing We Love?: Emersonian Perfectionism and the Films of Alfred Hitchcock. Columbia University Press.
    William Rothman argues that the driving force of Hitchcock's work was his struggle to reconcile the dark vision of his favorite Oscar Wilde quote, "Each man kills the thing he loves," with the quintessentially American philosophy, articulated in Emerson's writings, that gave classical Hollywood movies of the New Deal era their extraordinary combination of popularity and artistic seriousness. A Hitchcock thriller could be a comedy of remarriage or a melodrama of an unknown woman, both Emersonian genres, except for the (...)
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  34. Steven G. Smith (1992). Gender Thinking. Temple University Press.
    This study uses a fourfold conception of the "natural" and sets up a dialectic between positive and critical gender thinking to develop answers to these questions: What sort of thing do we take femininity and masculinity to be? How is gender related to humanity? What does gender imply about embodiment? How does gender inflect ideals of personal worth? How does gender dichotomizing align genders with other dichotomized qualities? What does gender thinking assume or imply about procreation? What (...)
     
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  35. Willem A. deVries, Sellars, Realism, and Kantian Thinking. Normative Functionalism and the Pittsburgh School.
    This essay is a response to Patrick Reider’s essay “Sellars on Perception, Science and Realism: A Critical Response.” Reider is correct that Sellars’s realism is in tension with his generally Kantian approach to issues of knowledge and mind, but I do not think Reider’s analysis correctly locates the sources of that tension or how Sellars himself hoped to be able to resolve it. Reider’s own account of idealism and the reasons supporting it are rooted in the epistemological tradition that informed (...)
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  36.  33
    Roberta L. Millstein (2015). Thinking About Populations and Races in Time. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 52:5-11.
    Biologists and philosophers have offered differing concepts of biological race. That is, they have offered different candidates for what a biological correlate of race might be; for example, races might be subspecies, clades, lineages, ecotypes, or genetic clusters. One thing that is striking about each of these proposals is that they all depend on a concept of population. Indeed, some authors have explicitly characterized races in terms of populations. However, including the concept of population into concepts of race raises (...)
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  37.  9
    Roberta L. Millstein, Thinking About Populations and Races in Time.
    Biologists and philosophers have offered differing concepts of biological race. That is, they have offered different candidates for what a biological correlate of race might be; for example, races might be subspecies, clades, lineages, ecotypes, or genetic clusters. One thing that is striking about each of these proposals is that they all depend on a concept of population. Indeed, some authors have explicitly characterized races in terms of populations. However, including the concept of population into concepts of race raises (...)
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  38. Stevan Harnad (2005). Distributed Processes, Distributed Cognizers and Collaborative Cognition. [Journal (Paginated)] (in Press) 13 (3):01-514.
    Cognition is thinking; it feels like something to think, and only those who can feel can think. There are also things that thinkers can do. We know neither how thinkers can think nor how they are able do what they can do. We are waiting for cognitive science to discover how. Cognitive science does this by testing hypotheses about what processes can generate what doing (“know-how”) This is called the Turing Test. It cannot test whether a process can generate (...)
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  39. Patrick J. Reider, Sellars on Perception, Science, and Realism: A Critical Response. Normative Functionalism and the Pittsburgh School.
    DeVries’ article “Sellars, Realism, and Kantian Thinking” misinterprets my argument that Sellars cannot show a sufficient degree of perceptual access for science to produce knowledge of “things-in-themselves” as involving a Cartesian characterization of Sellars. In correcting this misinterpretation (among many others), I will show that there are aspects of Sellars’ views on sensory receptivity, analogies, and representation that are at odds with the epistemic claim Sellars makes in regard to knowing the thing-in-itself, which deVries fails to acknowledge. In (...)
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  40.  20
    Graham Harman (2007). Heidegger Explained: From Phenomenon to Thing. Open Court.
    Martin Heidegger’s (1889-1976) influence has long been felt not just in philosophy, but also in such fields as art, architecture, and literary studies. Yet his difficult terminology has often scared away interested readers lacking an academic background in philosophy. In this new entry in the Ideas Explained series, author Graham Harman shows that Heidegger is actually one of the simplest and clearest of thinkers. His writings and analyses boil down to a single powerful idea: being is not presence. In any (...)
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  41.  17
    J. B. Shank (2004). "There Was No Such Thing as the 'Newtonian Revolution,' and the French Initiated It." Eighteenth-Century Mechanics in France Before Maupertuis. Early Science and Medicine 9 (3):257-292.
    Two linked arguments are offered in this paper. The first half argues that I.B. Cohen's notion of the "Newtonian Revolution" in mechanics needs to be revised in light of the recent historical work of Michel Blay, Henk Bos, and Niccolò Guicciardini. It further suggests a new way of thinking about the history of French mathematical mechanics in the decades around 1700 that follows as a consequence of these historical revisions. The second half of the paper builds upon these revisions (...)
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  42.  5
    Catherine E. Seta, John J. Seta, John V. Petrocelli & Michael McCormick (2015). Even Better Than the Real Thing: Alternative Outcome Bias Affects Decision Judgements and Decision Regret. Thinking and Reasoning 21 (4):446-472.
    Three experiments demonstrated that decisions resulting in considerable amounts of profit, but missed alternative outcomes of greater profits, were rated lower in quality and produced more regret than did decisions that returned lesser amounts of profit but either did not miss or missed only slightly better alternatives. These effects were mediated by upward counterfactuals and moderated by participants’ orientation to the decision context. That decision evaluations were affected by the availability and magnitude of alternative outcomes rather than the positivity of (...)
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  43.  14
    Jonathan Culler (2008). The Most Interesting Thing in the World. Diacritics 38 (1-2):7-16.
    The topic of the relation between literature and democracy in Derrida's thinking is introduced, focusing especially on the problem of the secret, which has loomed large in Derrida's late discussions of both literature and democracy.
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  44.  14
    Ido Geiger (2005). Is Art a Thing of the Past? Idealistic Studies 35 (2-3):173-195.
    The claim that art has no role to play in what is of highest significance for modernity is often attributed to Hegel. Against this interpretation, the paper makes the following claims: First, Hegel does not claim that art is simply superseded in modernity by rational reflection. Artistic expression remains an essential human need in modernity. Second, Hegel’s ideal of modern ethical life in which values shape human nature has an essentially aesthetic shape. Third, Hegel describes the foundation of a new (...)
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  45.  39
    K. Frankish & M. Kasmirli, Saying One Thing and Meaning Another: A Dual Process Approach to Conversational Implicature.
    [About the book]: This volume is a state-of-the-art survey of the psychology of reasoning, based around, and in tribute to, one of the field's most eminent figures: Jonathan St B.T. Evans.In this collection of cutting edge research, Evans' collaborators and colleagues review a wide range of important and developing areas of inquiry. These include biases in thinking, probabilistic and causal reasoning, people's use of 'if' sentences in arguments, the dual-process theory of thought, and the nature of human rationality. These (...)
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  46.  41
    Colin McGinn (1992). Moral Literacy, or, How to Do the Right Thing. Hackett Pub. Co..
    The book is short and yet it richly embodies the methods of ethical thinking about practical moral problems that are hard for students to learn unless they see ...
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  47.  2
    Julie A. Nelson (2015). Is Dismissing Environmental Caution the Manly Thing to Do?: Gender and the Economics of Environmental Protection. Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):99-122.
    Not understanding that doing nothing can be much more preferable to doing something potentially harmful. Recent developments in cognitive science have highlighted the power that stories, metaphors, and archetypes have on human thinking. In fact, to a large extent they are our thinking. Consider the archetypal image of the young adult male hero. He is brave, active, adventurous, innovative, knowledgeable, clever, confident, independent, in control, and not constrained by family, tradition, or public opinion. He is a character that (...)
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  48.  8
    Alexander Jech (2013). To Will One Thing. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):153-166.
    Before committing suicide, Othello says, "Speak of me as I am; . . . speak of one who loved not wisely, but too well."1 Thinking of his love for Desdemona, we are not likely to agree with his assessment that he loved her "too well," especially if loving well is supposed to require some kind of dependability or concern for her well-being; we would be loath even to grant that he loved her "too much." Othello's love for his wife (...)
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  49.  9
    Cynthia Gayman (2011). Politicizing the Personal: Thinking About the Feminist Subject with Michel Foucault and John Dewey. Foucault Studies 11:63-75.
    While the varied theoretical frameworks of second wave feminism made possible critical interrogation of societal patterns of domination and oppression in view of the transformative goal of liberation, Michel Foucault’s conceptualization of power shifts contemporary feminist thought away from this binary field of relations towards more fundamental questions about gender constitution. Indeed, from the perspective of popular culture it would seem that challenges to rigid gender roles were a thing of the past, to which freedom and certain kinds of (...)
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    Christopher Merwin (2014). Martin Heidegger: Bremen and Freiburg Lectures: Insight Into That Which is and Basic Principles of Thinking. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (3-4):457-464.
    In November 1953 after giving his lecture “The Question Concerning Technology” at the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, Martin Heidegger wrote in a letter to his wife: “Yet the decisive thing is…the fact that a horizon is opening up amongst the young people, one which announces itself from within technology while going beyond it.” The genesis of Heidegger’s now famous essay occurred 4 years earlier, however, during a series of four lectures delivered on the evening of December 1st, 1949 (...)
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