Search results for 'Third Man Argument' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. D. T. J. Bailey (2009). The Third Man Argument. Philosophy Compass 4 (4):666-681.score: 540.0
    This paper is a brief discussion of the famous 'Third Man Argument' as it appears in Plato's dialogue Parmenides . I mention, criticise and refine the most influential analytic approach to the argument; show that the actual conclusion of the argument is different from the one attributed to it by the majority of scholars; and elaborate two responses to the argument, both of which shed interesting light on the Theory of Forms.
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  2. Laurence Goldstein & Paul Mannick (1978). The Form of the Third Man Argument. Apeiron 12 (2):6 - 13.score: 540.0
    Our interpretation of the "parmenides" 132a1 - 132b2 has the following features. (i) it stresses that the third man argument is an infinite regress and (ii) notes its epistemological thrust. (iii) a faithful translation of the last line of the argument reads "and no longer will each of the forms be for you one but each is infinite in multitude." parmenides' point is that each form, which socrates believed to be complete (one), turns out to be an (...)
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  3. Theodore Scaltsas (1989). The Logic of the Dilemma of Participation and of the Third Man Argument. Apeiron 22 (4):67 - 90.score: 540.0
    In this paper i offer a detailed analysis of the dilemma of participation (parmenides, 130e-131e), in which plato considers the consequences of participation in the whole, and in a part of, a form. This analysis explains, in contrast to existing interpretations of the argument, plato's claim that participation in parts of a form is incompatible with the uniqueness of the form, and his modal claim that becoming equal by possessing part of the equal is absurd. In the second part (...)
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  4. Zhi-Hue Wang (2008). Plato's Third Man Argument. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:197-203.score: 540.0
    This article is concerned with the problem of how to avoid the Third Man Argument which Plato put forward in Parmenides 132a1-b2. According to Gregory Vlastos, this argument is based on two tacit assumptions: the Self-Predication and the Non-Identity Assumption. In recent years there have been a number ofinterpretations which attempted to avoid the Third Man Argument by proving that the Self-Predication Assumption is not an acceptable part of Plato’s theory. However, in this article I (...)
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  5. William J. Prior (1983). Timaeus 48e-52d and the Third Man Argument. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9.score: 540.0
    In this article I argue that "timaeus" 48e-52d, The passage in which plato introduces the receptacle into his ontology, Contains the material for a satisfactory response to the third man argument. Plato's use of "this" and "such" to distinguish the receptacle, Becoming, And the forms clarifies the nature of his ontology and indicates that the forms are not, In general, Self-Predicative. This result removes one argument against regarding the "timaeus" as a late dialogue.
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  6. Leone Gazziero (2012). The Latin “Third Man”. A Survey and Edition of Texts From the XIIIth Century. Cahiers de L’Institut du Moyen Age Grec Et Latin 81:11-93.score: 477.0
    Latin commentators came across the « Third Man » in Aristotle’s Sophistici elenchi. The way they dealt with the argument is a fair illustration of how they were both faithful to the text and innovative in their understanding of its most challenging issues. Besides providing a detailed survey of all manuscript sources, the introductory essay shows that Latin interpretation originates from a mistake in Boethius’ translation which radically transformed the argument. The edition makes available for the first (...)
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  7. Gregory Vlastos (1969). Plato's "Third Man" Argument (PARM. 132a1-B2): Text and Logic. Philosophical Quarterly 19 (77):289-301.score: 459.0
    This paper is a restatement of my earlier analysis of this argument (1954), Revised in the light of critical comments by other scholars and of closer study of the text. It includes a critical discussion of an alternative formalization of the argument, First offered by wilfrid sellars (1955) and retained (with modifications) by colin strang (1963), Which eliminates successfully the inconsistency of the premises of the argument but has dubious support from plato's text.
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  8. Richard Sharvy (1986). Plato's Causal Logic and the Third Man Argument. Noûs 20 (4):507-530.score: 453.0
    (1) anything that fs does so because it participates in the f itself. (2) it is impossible that: a form phi fs because phi participates in phi. (3) the f itself fs. These are inconsistent all right, but (1) is not a doctrine of the theory of forms, and (2) is neither reasonable nor held by plato! but the tma does not involve any of these three. Rather, the tma is aimed at (4) anything that fs does so (a) because (...)
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  9. Jurgis Brakas (2011). Plato, Aristotle, and the Third Man Argument. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 453.0
  10. Gregory Vlastos (1954). The Third Man Argument in the Parmenides. Philosophical Review 63 (3):319-349.score: 450.0
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  11. Bryan Frances (1996). Plato's Response to the Third Man Argument in the Paradoxical Exercise of the Parmenides. Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):47-64.score: 450.0
  12. Gregory Vlastos (1955). Addenda to the Third Man Argument: A Reply to Professor Sellars. Philosophical Review 64 (3):438-448.score: 450.0
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  13. Sandra Peterson (1973). A Reasonable Self-Predication Premise for the Third Man Argument. Philosophical Review 82 (4):451-470.score: 450.0
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  14. J. M. E. Moravcsik (1963). The 'Third Man' Argument and Plato's Theory of Forms1. Phronesis 8 (1):50-62.score: 450.0
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  15. Richard Sharvy (1987). Erratum: Plato's Causal Logic and the Third Man Argument. Noûs 21 (3):455 -.score: 450.0
  16. Robert Barford (1978). The Context of the Third Man Argument in Plato's. Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (1).score: 450.0
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  17. J. M. E. Moravcsik (1963). The 'Third Man' Argument and Plato's Theory of Forms. Phronesis 8 (1):50 - 62.score: 450.0
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  18. Theodore Scaltsas (1992). A Necessary Falsehood in the Third Man Argument. Phronesis 37 (2):216-232.score: 450.0
  19. James C. Dybikowski (1972). Professor Owen, Aristotle, and the Third Man Argument. Mind 81 (323):445-447.score: 450.0
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  20. Theodore Scaltsas (1992). A Necessary Falsehood in the Third Man Argument. Phronesis 37 (2):216-232.score: 450.0
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  21. Joan Kung (1981). Aristotle on Thises, Suches and the Third Man Argument. Phronesis 26 (3):207 - 247.score: 450.0
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  22. Sandra Peterson (1975). A Correction to "a Reasonable Self-Predication Premise for the Third Man Argument". Philosophical Review 84 (1):96.score: 450.0
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  23. Henry Teloh & David James Louzecky (1972). Plato's Third Man Argument. Phronesis 17 (1):80 - 94.score: 450.0
  24. K. W. Rankin (1970). Is the Third Man Argument an Inconsistent Triad? Philosophical Quarterly 20 (81):378-380.score: 450.0
    To understand the tma we should follow a rule of polemical force as well as a rule of validity. Following just the latter vlastos renders the explicit theory of forms and the two suppressed premises as an inconsistent triad. But the rule of polemical force indicates that the explicit theory is ambivalent. Just one f-Ness must be the basis, Either for any f thing being f, Or for any set of f things being just that set. It cannot be the (...)
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  25. Roger A. Shiner (1970). Self-Predication and the "Third Man" Argument. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (4).score: 450.0
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  26. M. Richard Diaz (1978). What is the Third Man Argument? Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):155-165.score: 450.0
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  27. Robert Barford (1978). The Context of the Third Man Argument in Plato's Parmenides. Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (1):1-11.score: 450.0
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  28. N. B. Booth (1958). Assumptions Involved in the Third Man Argument. Phronesis 3 (2):146-149.score: 450.0
  29. Andrej Zarević (2006). Third Man Argument. Theoria 49 (4):51-69.score: 450.0
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  30. B. Sharvy (1986). Plato's Causal Logic and the Third Man Argument. Noûs 20 (4):507-530.score: 450.0
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  31. Ravi Sharma (2005). What is Aristotle's 'Third Man'Argument Against the Forms'. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 28:123-160.score: 450.0
     
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  32. F. R. Pickering (1981). Plato's `Third Man' Arguments. Mind 90 (358):263-269.score: 380.0
    Plato presents us with two versions of the "third man" argument in the "parmenides": they occur in a tightly-knit passage of reasoning containing four arguments against the theory of forms (130e-133a). The orthodox interpretation is that both versions are attempts to show that certain basic tenets of the theory, including a one-over-many principle, form an inconsistent set. The author argues that this interpretation cannot be correct, since it renders incoherent the train of thought in the wider passage and (...)
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  33. Leone Gazziero (2010). «καὶ ὅτι ἔστι τις τρίτος ἄνθρωπος»(Aristotelis sophistici elenchi 22 178b36–179a10). Prolégomènes à une histoire ancienne de l'argument du 'troisième. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science:181-220.score: 315.0
    Few arguments from the past have stirred up as much interest as Aristotle’s “Third man” and not so many texts have received as much attention as its account in chapter 22 of the Sophistici elenchi. And yet, several issues about both remain highly controversial, starting from the very nature of the argument at stake and the exact signification of some of its features. The essay provides a close commentary of the text, dealing with its main difficulties and suggesting (...)
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  34. S. Marc Cohen (1971). The Logic of the Third Man. Philosophical Review 80 (4):448-475.score: 300.0
    The main lines of interpretation offered to date of the Third Man Argument in Plato's Parmenides (132a1-b2) are considered and rejected. A new, set-theoretic, reconstruction of the argument is offered. It is concluded that the philosophical point of the argument is different from what it has been generally supposed to be: Plato is pointing out the logical shortcomings in his earlier formulated principle of One-Over-Many.
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  35. Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Edward N. Zalta (2000). How to Say Goodbye to the Third Man. Noûs 34 (2):165–202.score: 300.0
    In (1991), Meinwald initiated a major change of direction in the study of Plato’s Parmenides and the Third Man Argument. On her conception of the Parmenides , Plato’s language systematically distinguishes two types or kinds of predication, namely, predications of the kind ‘x is F pros ta alla’ and ‘x is F pros heauto’. Intuitively speaking, the former is the common, everyday variety of predication, which holds when x is any object (perceptible object or Form) and F is (...)
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  36. Robert A. Brinkley (1982). Plato's Third Man and the Limits of Cognition. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 60 (2):152 – 157.score: 300.0
    Discussions of plato's third man argument have tended to obscure its force within the context of "parmenides". The tma introduces a demonstration by parmenides of the logic of dialectic. The argument does not refute the theory of forms: rather it illuminates particular difficulties involved in any attempt to conceive of what forms do. As a form, the large enables us to observe the same attribute in a number of objects. As such it is not an object of (...)
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  37. Debra Nails (1978). Epitaph For The Third Man. Auslegung 6:6-23.score: 300.0
    The "third man" argument presented in plato's "parmenides" is valid against any articulated version of the theory of forms. Plato recognized this fact, yet continued to hold the theory because the most fundamental description of what is (the "unwritten theory") cannot be articulated and does not fall victim to the third man.
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  38. Leone Gazziero (2008). Rationes ex machina. La micrologie à l’âge de l’industrie de l’argument. Vrin.score: 282.0
    Do Ideas exist and can we prove it ? Do proofs of their existence have all the same value or not ? Aristotle addresses these issues in two famous documents of the controversy that pitted supporters of the theory of Forms against its opponents within Plato’s Academy : his lost work, quoted by Alexander of Aphrodisias by the title of Peri Ideon, and the lengthy thrust against Ideas that can be read, with some minor variations, in books A, chapter 9, (...)
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  39. Erik C. W. Krabbe (1998). Who is Afraid of Figure of Speech? Argumentation 12 (2):281-294.score: 273.0
    Aristotle's illustrations of the fallacy of Figure of Speech (or Form of Expression) are none too convincing. They are tied to Aristotle's theory of categories and to peculiarities of Greek grammar that fail to hold appeal for a contemporary readership. Yet, upon closer inspection, Figure of Speech shows many points of contact with views and problems that inhabit 20th-century analytical philosophy. In the paper, some Aristotelian examples will be analyzed to gain a better understanding of this fallacy. The case of (...)
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  40. Leone Gazziero (2014). “ἐὰν ὡσαύτως τῇ ψυχῇ ἐπὶ πάντα ἴδῃς” (Platonis Parmenides, 132a 1 - 132b 2). Voir les Idées avec son âme et le “Troisième homme” de Platon. Revue de Philosophie Ancienne 32 (1):35-85.score: 270.0
    Few arguments from the past have stirred up as much interest as Aristotle’s “Third man” and not so many texts have received as much attention as its account in chapter 22 of the Sophistici elenchi. And yet, several issues about both remain highly controversial, starting from the very nature of the argument at stake and the exact signification of some of its features. The essay provides a close commentary of the text, dealing with its main difficulties and suggesting (...)
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  41. Michael Hatcher (2013). Reid's Third Argument for Moral Liberty. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):688-710.score: 261.0
    Thomas Reid uses the term ?moral liberty? to refer to a kind of free will that is agent-causal and incompatible with determinism. I offer and textually support a new interpretation of Reid's third argument for moral liberty, which Reid presents in Section 4.8 of Essays on the Active Powers of Man. Generally regarded as obscure, most commentators either ignore Reid's third argument or lend it cursory attention. In my interpretation, Reid points to the truism that we (...)
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  42. Mario Mignucci (1990). Plato's “Third Man” Arguments in the Parmenides. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 72 (2):143-181.score: 243.3
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  43. Leone Gazziero (2013). Et quoniam est quis tertius homo. Argument, exégèse, contresens dans la littérature latine apparentée aux Sophistici elenchi d’Aristote. Archives D’Histoire Doctrinale Et Littéraire du Moyen Âge 80:7-48.score: 225.0
  44. Arnold Cusmariu (1985). Self-Predication and the "Third Man&Quot;. Grazer Philosophische Studien 23 (1):105-118.score: 219.0
    Generations of scholars have worked to clarify the structure and content of the TMA, one of the most famous arguments in the history of philosophy. Though progress has been made, I show that a premise crucial to the argument has yet to be stated openly. This premise holds the way out of the predicament that enables Plato to retain intact the foundations of the Theory of Forms.
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  45. David Robjant (2012). The Earthy Realism of Plato's Metaphysics, Or: What Shall We Do with Iris Murdoch? Philosophical Investigations 35 (1):43-67.score: 189.0
    I develop Iris Murdoch's argument that “there is no Platonic ‘elsewhere,’ similar to the Christian ‘elsewhere.’ ” Thus: Iris Murdoch is against the Separation of the Forms not as a correction of Plato but in order to keep faith with him; Plato's Parmenides is not a source book of accurately targeted self-refutation but a catalogue of student errors; the testimony of Aristotle and Gilbert Ryle about Plato's motivations in the Theory of Forms is not an indubitable foundation from which (...)
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  46. Alastair Hannay (1990). Human Consciousness. Routledge.score: 180.0
    CHAPTER I The Problem I have been accused of denying consciousness, but I am not conscious of having done so. Consciousness is to me a mystery, ...
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  47. M. R. M. ter Hark (1991). The Development of Wittgenstein's Views About the Other Minds Problem. Synthese 227 (May):227-253.score: 180.0
  48. P. Schweizer (1994). Self-Predication and the Third Man. Erkenntnis 40 (1):21 - 42.score: 168.0
    The paper addresses the widely held position that the Third Man regress in theParmenides is caused at least in part by the self-predicational aspect of Plato's Ideas. I offer a critique of the logic behind this type of interpretation, and argue that if the Ideas are construed as genuinely applying to themselves, then the regress is dissolved. Furthermore, such an interpretation can be made technically precise by modeling Platonic Universals as non-wellfounded sets. This provides a solution to the (...) Man regress, and allows a consistent reading of both self-predication and the singularity of the respective Forms. (shrink)
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