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Thomas A. C. Reydon [27]Thomas A. C. E. Reydon [1]
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  1. Marc Ereshefsky & Thomas A. C. Reydon (forthcoming). Scientific Kinds. Philosophical Studies.
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  2. Thomas A. C. Reydon (forthcoming). MATTHEW H. SLATER Are Species Real? An Essay on the Metaphysics of Species. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axu030.
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  3. Thomas A. C. Reydon & Markus Scholz (forthcoming). Searching for Darwinism in Generalized Darwinism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axt049.
    While evolutionary thinking is increasingly becoming popular in fields of investigation outside the biological sciences, it remains unclear how helpful it is there and whether it actually yields good explanations of the phenomena under study. Here we examine the ontology of a recent approach to applying evolutionary thinking outside biology, the generalized Darwinism (GD) approach proposed by Geoffrey Hodgson and Thorbjørn Knudsen. We examine the ontology of populations in biology and in GD, and argue that biological evolutionary theory sets ontological (...)
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  4. Thomas A. C. Reydon & Markus Scholz (2014). Darwinism and Organizational Ecology A Case of Incompleteness or Incompatibility? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (3):365-374.
    Recently, Dollimore criticized our claim that Organizational Ecology is not a Darwinian research program. She argued that Organizational Ecology is merely an incomplete Darwinian program and provided a suggestion as to how this incompleteness could be remedied. Here, we argue that Dollimore’s suggestion fails to remedy the principal problem that Organizational Ecology faces and that there are good reasons to think of the program as deeply incompatible with Darwinian thinking.
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  5. Maarten Franssen, Peter Kroes, Pieter Vermaas & Thomas A. C. Reydon (eds.) (2013). Artefact Kinds: Ontology and the Human-Made World. Synthese Library.
    One way to address such questions about artifact kinds is to look for clues in the available literature on parallel questions that have been posed with respect to kinds in the natural domain. Philosophers have long been concerned with the ...
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  6. Miles MacLeod & Thomas A. C. Reydon (2013). Natural Kinds in Philosophy and in the Life Sciences: Scholastic Twilight or New Dawn? [REVIEW] Biological Theory 7 (2):89-99.
    This article, which is intended both as a position paper in the philosophical debate on natural kinds and as the guest editorial to this thematic issue, takes up the challenge posed by Ian Hacking in his paper, “Natural Kinds: Rosy Dawn, Scholastic Twilight.” Whereas a straightforward interpretation of that paper suggests that according to Hacking the concept of natural kinds should be abandoned, both in the philosophy of science and in philosophy more generally, we suggest that an alternative and less (...)
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  7. Kathryn S. Plaisance, Thomas A. C. Reydon & Mehmet Elgin (2012). Why the (Gene) Counting Argument Fails in the Massive Modularity Debate: The Need for Understanding Gene Concepts and Genotype-Phenotype Relationships. Philosophical Psychology 25 (6):873-892.
    A number of debates in philosophy of biology and psychology, as well as in their respective sciences, hinge on particular views about the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes. One such view is that the genotype-phenotype relationship is relatively straightforward, in the sense that a genome contains the ?genes for? the various traits that an organism exhibits. This leads to the assumption that if a particular set of traits is posited to be present in an organism, there must be a corresponding (...)
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  8. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2012). How-Possibly Explanations as Genuine Explanations and Helpful Heuristics: A Comment on Forber. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):302-310.
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  9. Kathryn S. Plaisance & Thomas A. C. Reydon (eds.) (2011). Philosophy of Behavioral Biology. Springer: Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, vol. 282.
    This volume provides a broad overview of issues in the philosophy of behavioral biology, covering four main themes: genetic, developmental, evolutionary, and neurobiological explanations of behavior. It is both interdisciplinary and empirically informed in its approach, addressing philosophical issues that arise from recent scientific findings in biological research on human and non-human animal behavior. Accordingly, it includes papers by professional philosophers and philosophers of science, as well as practicing scientists. Much of the work in this volume builds on presentations given (...)
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  10. Thomas A. C. Reydon & Paul Hoyningen‐Huene (2010). Discussion: Kuhn's Evolutionary Analogy in the Structure of Scientific Revolutions and “the Road Since Structure”. Philosophy of Science 77 (3):468-476.
    Recently, Barbara Renzi argued that Kuhn's account of scientific change is undermined by mismatches in the analogy that Kuhn supposedly draws between scientific change and biological evolution. We argue that Renzi's criticism is inadequate to Kuhn's account of scientific change, as Kuhn does not draw any precise analogy between the mechanisms of scientific change and biological evolution nor aims to argue that the mechanisms of scientific change and biological evolution are similar in any important respects. Therefore, pointing to mismatches between (...)
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  11. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2009). Gene Names as Proper Names of Individuals: An Assessment. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (2):409-432.
    According to a recent suggestion, the names of gene taxa should be conceived of as referring to individuals with concrete genes as their parts, just as the names of biological species are often understood as denoting individuals with organisms as their parts. Although prima facie this suggestion might advance the debate on gene concepts in a similar way as the species-are-individuals thesis advanced the debate on species concepts, I argue that the principal arguments in support of the gene-individuality thesis are (...)
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  12. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2009). Do the Life Sciences Need Natural Kinds? Croatian Journal of Philosophy 9 (2):167-190.
    Natural kinds have been a constant topic in philosophy throughout its history, but many issues pertaining to natural kinds still remain unresolved. This paper considers one of these issues: the epistemic role of natural kinds in scientific investigation. I begin by clarifying what is at stake for an individual scientific field when asking whether or not the field studies a natural kind. I use an example from life science, concerning how biologists explain the similar body shapes of fish and cetaceans, (...)
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  13. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2009). Species and Kinds: A Critique of Rieppel’s “One of a Kind” Account of Species. Cladistics 25 (6):660-667.
    A major issue in philosophical debates on the species problem concerns the opposition between two seemingly incompatible views of the metaphysics of species: the view that species are individuals and the view that species are natural kinds. In two recent papers in this journal, Olivier Rieppel suggested that this opposition is much less deep than it seems at first sight. Rieppel used a recently developed philosophical account of natural kindhood, namely Richard Boyd’s “homeostatic property cluster” theory, to argue that every (...)
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  14. Thomas A. C. Reydon, Helmut Heit & Paul Hoyningen-Huene (eds.) (2009). Der Universale Leibniz: Denker, Forscher, Erfinder. Steiner.
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  15. Thomas A. C. Reydon & Markus Scholz (2009). Why Organizational Ecology is Not a Darwinian Research Program. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (3):408-439.
    Organizational ecology is commonly seen as a Darwinian research program that seeks to explain the diversity of organizational structures, properties and behaviors as the product of selection in past social environments in a similar manner as evolutionary biology seeks to explain the forms, properties and behaviors of organisms as consequences of selection in past natural environments. We argue that this explanatory strategy does not succeed because organizational ecology theory lacks an evolutionary mechanism that could be identified as the principal cause (...)
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  16. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2008). Species in Three and Four Dimensions. Synthese 164 (2):161 - 184.
    There is an interesting parallel between two debates in different domains of contemporary analytic philosophy. One is the endurantism–<span class='Hi'>perdurantism</span>, or three-dimensionalism vs. four-dimensionalism, debate in analytic metaphysics. The other is the debate on the species problem in philosophy of biology. In this paper I attempt to cross-fertilize these debates with the aim of exploiting some of the potential that the two debates have to advance each other. I address two issues. First, I explore what the case of species implies (...)
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  17. Markus Scholz & Thomas A. C. Reydon (2008). The Population Ecology Programme in Organisation Studies. Philosophy of Management 6 (3):39-51.
    Economics and social sciences in general have a long tradition of using theories, models, concepts, and so forth borrowed from the natural sciences to describe and explain the properties and behaviours of economic and social entities. However, unwarranted application of theoretical elements from the natural sciences in the economic/social domain can have adverse consequences for organisations, their employees and society in general. Focusing on biology and organisation studies, we discuss the general problems that may arise when theoretical elements from natural (...)
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  18. Rob Hengeveld & Thomas A. C. Reydon (2007). Editorial: A New Turn in the Study of the Origin of Life. Acta Biotheoretica 55 (2).
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  19. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2007). Philosophy of Biology, German Style. Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):619-626.
  20. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2007). Philosophy of Biology, German styleReview of Ulrich Krohs and Georg Toepfer (Eds): Philosophie der Biologie: Eine Einführung [Philosophy of Biology: An Introduction]. Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):619-626.
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  21. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2006). Generalizations and Kinds in Natural Science: The Case of Species. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (2):230-255.
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  22. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2005). On the Nature of the Species Problem and the Four Meanings of 'Species'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (1):135-158.
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  23. Thomas A. C. E. Reydon (2005). Bridging the Gap Between History and Philosophy of Biology. Metascience 14 (2):249-253.
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  24. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2004). Why Does the Species Problem Still Persist? Bioessays 26 (3):300-305.
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  25. Noretta Koertge, Janet A. Kourany, Ronald N. Giere, Peter Gildenhuys, Thomas A. C. Reydon, Stéphanie Ruphy, Samir Okasha, Jaakko Hintikka & John Symons (2003). 10. Simulated Experiments: Methodology for a Virtual World Simulated Experiments: Methodology for a Virtual World (Pp. 105-125). [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 70 (1).
     
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  26. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2003). Discussion: Species Are Individuals—or Are They? Philosophy of Science 70 (1):49-56.
    Recently Coleman and Wiley presented a new defense of the species-are-individuals thesis, based on an analysis of the use of binomial species names by biologists. Here I point out some problems in their defense and I argue that although in some domains of biological science species are best understood as individuals, Coleman and Wiley fail to establish that this is true for the whole of biology.
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  27. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2003). Philosophy of Science in Seven Easy Lessons. Metascience 12 (2):235-237.
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