5 found
Sort by:
  1. Thomas A. Horne (1994). Liberalism and the Problem of Poverty: A Reply to Ashcraft. Critical Review 8 (3):427-434.
    In Property Rights and Poverty, / argued that seventeenth? to mid?nineteenth?century liberal theories of the natural right to property included both the ability to exclude others from resources lawfully acquired and the ability to claim as property the resources necessary for life and livelihood. Virtually every defense of the right to exclude written during this period carried limits which allowed and even required the government to enforce the rights of those without resources to the property of others. But although Locke, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Thomas A. Horne (1988). Welfare Rights as Property Rights. In J. Donald Moon (ed.), Responsibility, Rights, and Welfare: The Theory of the Welfare State. Westview Press. 107--132.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thomas A. Horne (1985). "The Poor Have a Claim Founded in the Law of Nature": William Paley and the Rights of the Poor. Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (1):51-70.
  4. Thomas A. Horne (1983). Bourgeois Virtue: Property and Moral Philosophy in America, 1750–1800. History of Political Thought 4:317-40.
  5. Thomas A. Horne (1981). Envy and Commercial Society: Mandeville and Smith on "Private Vices, Public Benefits". Political Theory 9 (4):551-569.
    Man [in commercial society] is sometimes found a detached and solitary being; he has found an object which sets him in competition with his fellow creatures, and he deals with them as he does with his cattle and his soil, for the sake of the profits they bring; the mighty engine which we suppose to have formed society, only tends to set its members at variance, or to continue their intercourse after the bonds of affection are broken.1.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation