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Thomas A. Lewis [13]Thomas Abner Lewis [1]
  1. Thomas A. Lewis (2006). Freedom and Tradition in Hegel. Ars Disputandi 6 (224):1566-5399.
     
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  2.  15
    Thomas A. Lewis (2011). Religion, Modernity, and Politics in Hegel. Oxford University Press.
    Attending closely to Hegel's social, political, and intellectual context, the book begins with Hegel's early concerns with a modern civil religion in the ...
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  3.  14
    Thomas A. Lewis (2010). Ethnography, Anthropology, and Comparative Religious Ethics: Or Ethnography and the Comparative Religious Ethics Local. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):395-403.
    Recent ethnographic studies of lived ethics, such as those of Leela Prasad and Saba Mahmood, present valuable opportunities for comparative religious ethics. This essay argues that developments in philosophical and religious ethics over the last three decades have supported a strong interest in thick descriptions of what it means to be human. This anthropological turn has thereby laid important groundwork for the encounter between these scholars and new ethnographic studies. Nonetheless, an encounter it is. Each side brings novel questions to (...)
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  4.  7
    Thomas A. Lewis, Jonathan Wyn Schofer, Aaron Stalnaker & Mark A. Berkson (2005). Anthropos and Ethics Categories of Inquiry and Procedures of Comparison. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):177-185.
    Building on influential work in virtue ethics, this collection of essays examines the categories of self, person, and anthropology as foci for comparative analysis. The papers unite reflections on theory and method with descriptive work that addresses thinkers from the modern West, Christian and Jewish Late Antiquity, early China, and other settings. The introduction sets out central methodological issues that are subsequently taken up in each essay, including the origin of the categories through which comparison proceeds, the status of these (...)
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  5. Thomas A. Lewis, Jonathan Wyn Schofer, Aaron Stalnaker & Mark A. Berkson (2005). Anthropos and Ethics: Categories of Inquiry and Procedures of Comparison. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):177 - 185.
    Building on influential work in virtue ethics, this collection of essays examines the categories of self, person, and anthropology as foci for comparative analysis. The papers unite reflections on theory and method with descriptive work that addresses thinkers from the modern West, Christian and Jewish Late Antiquity, early China, and other settings. The introduction sets out central methodological issues that are subsequently taken up in each essay, including the origin of the categories through which comparison proceeds, the status of these (...)
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  6. Thomas A. Lewis (2005). Freedom and Tradition in Hegel: Reconsidering Anthropology, Ethics, and Religion. University of Notre Dame Press.
    _Freedom and Tradition in Hegel _stands at the intersection of three vital currents in contemporary ethics: debates over philosophical anthropology and its significance for ethics, reevaluations of tradition and modernity, and a resurgence of interest in Hegel. Thomas A. Lewis engages these three streams of thought in light of Hegel’s recently published _Vorlesungen über die Philosophie des Geistes_. Drawing extensively on these lectures, Lewis addresses an important lacuna in Hegelian scholarship by first providing a systematic analysis of Hegel’s philosophical anthropology (...)
     
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  7.  7
    Thomas A. Lewis (2005). FRAMES OF COMPARISON Anthropology and Inheriting Traditional Practices. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):225-253.
    This essay seeks to develop and illustrate an approach to comparison based on "ad hoc" frames. A frame is defined by a question, to which dif- ferent thinkers can be seen as offering complementary and/or competing responses. Pursuing a middle ground between universalist conceptions of comparison and particularist rejections of comparison, this approach brings various positions into dialogue in a manner that is not inherently totalizing. The article draws extensively on Hegel's philosophy of religion to articulate this approach to comparison (...)
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  8.  33
    Thomas A. Lewis (2007). Speaking of Habits. The Owl of Minerva 39 (1-2):25-53.
    Hegel’s account of habit plays a vital, though often overlooked, role in his philosophical anthropology as well as his ethical thought. Although first introduced in relation to basic physical capacities, habituation reappears in his account of language and in the unconscious appropriation of ethical life. Because acting out of habit is not acting freely, our freedom depends upon the abilit y to reflect consciously on our habits—which for Hegel requires articulating them in language. Contrasting Hegel with Bourdieu on the expressibilit (...)
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    Thomas A. Lewis (2005). Actions as the Ties That Bind: Love, Praxis, and Community in the Thought of Gustavo Gutiérrez. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):539 - 567.
    Gustavo Gutiérrez develops an account of human action or praxis that I--borrowing the language of Charles Taylor--label expressivist. Human action must be understood as expressing an underlying potential or impulse that only becomes real through expression in action. Gutiérrez's expressivism is fundamental to his view of the relationship between faith and love, his notion of three dimensions of liberation/salvation, and his understanding of the fundamental option as a yes or no in response to grace. Moreover, it supports a valuable approach (...)
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  10. Thomas A. Lewis (2005). Actions as the Ties That Bind Love, Praxis, and Community in the Thought of Gustavo Gutierrez. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):539-567.
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  11. Thomas A. Lewis (2008). Religion and Demythologization in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. In Dean Moyar & Michael Quante (eds.), Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press
     
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  12. Thomas A. Lewis (2011). Religion, Modernity, and Politics in Hegel. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Religion, Modernity, and Politics in Hegel analyzes Hegel's philosophy of religion and develops its significance for ongoing debates about the relation between religion and politics as well as the history of the conceptualization of religion. One of the most vital currents in contemporary Hegel scholarship argues that Hegel radicalizes, rather than reneges upon, Kant's critique of metaphysics. Critics have claimed that this new scholarship cannot account for Hegel's treatment of religion. Addressing an important lacuna in the scholarship, Lewis argues that (...)
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  13. Thomas A. Lewis (2015). Why Philosophy Matters for the Study of Religion - & Vice Versa. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This work argues for the need to close the gap between the fields of the philosophy of religion and religious studies. Thomas A. Lewis takes up what, in recent years, has often been seen as a fundamental reason for excluding religious ethics and philosophy of religion from religious studies: their explicit normativity. Against this presupposition, Lewis argues that normativity is pervasive--not unique to ethics and philosophy of religion--and therefore not a reason to exclude them from religious studies. He bridges more (...)
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