66 found
Order:
  1.  29
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (2010). Socratic Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Acknowledgements; 1. Apology of Socratic studies; 2. Motivational intellectualism; 3. The 'prudential paradox'; 4. Wrongdoing and damage to the soul; 5. Educating the appetites and passions; 6. Virtue intellectualism; 7. Socrates and his intellectual heirs: Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics; Appendix: Is Plato's Gorgias consistent with the other early or Socratic dialogues?; Bibliography of works cited; Index of passages; General index.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  2.  47
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1996). Plato's Socrates. OUP Usa.
    This book develops novel accounts of many of the most controversial topics in the philosophy of Socrates. The authors first develop Socrates' methodological, epistemological, and psychological views before examining his ethical, political, and religious convictions. The results reveals both the richness and the remarkable coherence of the philosophy of Plato's Socrates.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  3.  6
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1990). Socrates on Trial. Princeton University Press.
    Thomas Brickhouse and Nicholas Smith offer a comprehensive historical and philosophical interpretation of, and commentary on, one of Plato's most widely read works, the Apology of <span class='Hi'>Socrates</span>. Virtually every modern interpretation characterizes some part of what <span class='Hi'>Socrates</span> says in the Apology as purposefully irrelevant or even antithetical to convincing the jury to acquit him at his trial. This book, by contrast, argues persuasively that <span class='Hi'>Socrates</span> offers a sincere and well-reasoned defense against the charges he faces. First, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  4. Thomas C. Brickhouse (2000). The Philosophy of Socrates. Westview Press.
    This text provides an introduction to Socrates—both the charismatic, controversial historical figure and the essential Socratic philosophy. Written at a beginning level but incorporating recent scholarship, The Philosophy of Socrates offers numerous translations of pertinent passages. As they present these passages, Nicholas Smith and Thomas Brickhouse demonstrate why these passages are problematic, survey the interpretive and philosophical options, and conclude with brief defenses of their own proposed solutions. Throughout, the authors rely on standard translations to parallel accompanying assigned primary source (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  5.  15
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2013). Persuade Or Obey. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 19:69-83.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Rachana Kamtekar, Mark McPherran, P. T. Geach, S. Marc Cohen, Gregory Vlastos, E. De Strycker, S. R. Slings, Donald Morrison, Terence Irwin, M. F. Burnyeat, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Richard Kraut, David Bostock & Verity Harte (2004). Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Plato's Euthyrphro, Apology, andCrito portray Socrates' words and deeds during his trial for disbelieving in the Gods of Athens and corrupting the Athenian youth, and constitute a defense of the man Socrates and of his way of life, the philosophic life. The twelve essays in the volume, written by leading classical philosophers, investigate various aspects of these works of Plato, including the significance of Plato's characters, Socrates's revolutionary religious ideas, and the relationship between historical events and Plato's texts.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  75
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1997). Socrates and the Unity of the Virtues. Journal of Ethics 1 (4):311-324.
    In the Protagoras, Socrates argues that each of the virtue-terms refers to one thing (: 333b4). But in the Laches (190c8–d5, 199e6–7), Socrates claims that courage is a proper part of virtue as a whole, and at Euthyphro 11e7–12e2, Socrates says that piety is a proper part of justice. But A cannot be both identical to B and also a proper part of B – piety cannot be both identical to justice and also a proper part of justice. In this (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  8. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1984). Vlastos on the Elenchus'. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 2:185-96.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  11
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1987). Plato’s Socratic Conversations: Drama and Dialectic in the Three Middle Dialogues. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 7:219-222.
  10.  12
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1998). Socrates Dissatisfied. Ancient Philosophy 18 (2):465-472.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  22
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1984). Socrates and Obedience to the Law. Apeiron 18 (1):10 - 18.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1987). Socrates on Goods, Virtue, and Happiness'. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 5:1-27.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2007). Socrates on Akrasia, Knowledge, and the Power of Appearance. In Christopher Bobonich & Pierre Destrée (eds.), Akrasia in Greek Philosophy: From Socrates to Plotinus. Brill 1--18.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  94
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2007). Socrates on How Wrongdoing Damages the Soul. Journal of Ethics 11 (4):337 - 356.
    There has been little scholarly attention given to explaining exactly how and why Socrates thinks that wrongdoing damages the soul. But there is more than a simple gap in the literature here, we shall argue. The most widely accepted view of Socratic moral psychology, we claim, actually leaves this well-known feature of Socrates’ philosophy absolutely inexplicable. In the first section of this paper, we rehearse this view of Socratic moral psychology, and explain its inadequacy on the issue of the damaging (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2009). Socratic Teaching and Socratic Method. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  28
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (2003). Does Aristotle Have a Consistent Account of Vice? Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):3 - 23.
  17.  60
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (2004). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates. Routledge.
    Plato is the most important philosopher in the history of Western philosophy. This guidebook introduces and examines his three dialogues that deal with the death of Socrates: Euthphryo , Apology and Crito . These dialogues are widely regarded as the closest exposition of Socrates' ideas. Plato and the Trial of Socrates introduces and assesses: * Plato's life and the background to the three dialogues * The ideas and text in the three dialogues * Plato's continuing importance to philosophy Plato and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) (2002). The Trial and Execution of Socrates: Sources and Controversies. Oxford University Press.
    Socrates is one of the most important yet enigmatic philosophers of all time; his fame has endured for centuries despite the fact that he never actually wrote anything. In 399 B.C.E., he was tried on the charge of impiety by the citizens of Athens, convicted by a jury, and sentenced to death (ordered to drink poison derived from hemlock). About these facts there is no disagreement. However, as the sources collected in this book and the scholarly essays that follow them (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  8
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1978). Plato and Education. Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (3):344-344.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  21
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1991). Roberts on Responsibility for Action and Character in the Nicomachean Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):137-148.
  21.  14
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1984). The Paradox of Socratic Ignorance in Plato's Apology. History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (2):125 - 131.
  22.  52
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1985). The Formal Charges Against Socrates. Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (4):457-481.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  26
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2012). Response to Critics. Analytic Philosophy 53 (2):234-248.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2005). Plato and The Trial of Socrates. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 67 (2):348-351.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  9
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1990). A Friendly Companion to Plato's Gorgias. Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):282-285.
  26. Thomas C. Brickhouse (1978). More on the Paradox of the Philosopher's Rule. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 59 (3):304.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  11
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1987). Plato's Socratic Conversations. Ancient Philosophy 7:219-222.
  28.  10
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1999). The Religion of Socrates. Philosophical Review 108 (2):279-282.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  39
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1992). Self-Knowledge in Plato's Phaedrus. Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):187-189.
  30.  5
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1979). Plato's Philosopher-King: A Study of the Theoretical Background. Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (3):331-334.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  10
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (2014). Aristotle on Corrective Justice. Journal of Ethics 18 (3):187-205.
    This paper argues against the view favored by many contemporary scholars that corrective justice in the Nicomachean Ethics is essentially compensatory and in favor of a bifunctional account according to which corrective justice aims at equalizing inequalities of both goods and evils resulting from various interactions between persons. Not only does the account defended in this paper better explain the broad array of examples Aristotle provides than does the standard interpretation, it also better fits Aristotle’s general definition of what is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  18
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2012). Reply to Rowe. Journal of Ethics 16 (3):325-338.
    In our reply to Rowe, we explain why most of what he criticizes is actually the product of his misunderstanding our argument. We begin by showing that nearly all of his Part 1 misconceives our project by defending a position we never attacked. We then question why Rowe thinks the distinction we make between motivational and virtue intellectualism is unimportant before developing a defense of the consistency of our views about different desires. Next we turn to Rowe’s criticisms of our (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  10
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1982). Socrates' Proposed Penalty in Plato's Apology. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 64 (1):1-18.
  34.  7
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2008). Is the Prudential Paradox in the Meno? Philosophical Inquiry 30 (3-4):175-184.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  8
    James Bohman, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Alan Brinkley, Tex Waco, James M. Buchanan, Richard A. Musgrave, John D. Caputo, Michael J. Scanlon & Christopher Cox (2001). G. John M. Abbarno, The Ethics of Homelessness. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1999, 258 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 90-420-0777-X, $22.00 (Pb). Robert B. Baker, Arthur L. Caplan, Linda L. Emanuel and Stephen R. Latham, Eds., The American Medical Ethics Revolution. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999, 396 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-8018-6170. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35:285-289.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  29
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2006). Socrates and the Laws of Athens. Philosophy Compass 1 (6):564–570.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  7
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1996). Book Review: Plato's Apology of Socrates: A Literary and Philosophical Study with a Running Commentary. [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 117 (3):487-492.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  18
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1981). The Paradox of the Philosophers' Rule. Apeiron 15 (1):1 - 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  17
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2005). Socrates' "Daimonion" and Rationality. Apeiron 38 (2):43 - 62.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  15
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1978). Aristotle on Emotion. New Scholasticism 52 (3):459-463.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  16
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1986). 'The Divine Sign Did Not Oppose Me': A Problem in Plato's Apology. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):511 - 526.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  25
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1992). Socrates' Elenctic Psychology. Synthese 92 (1):63 - 82.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  25
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1989). A Matter of Life and Death in Socratic Philosophy. Ancient Philosophy 9 (2):155-165.
  44.  24
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1990). What Makes Socrates a Good Man? Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (2):169-179.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  6
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1979). Plato's Moral Theory. New Scholasticism 53 (4):529-535.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  14
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1997). The Problem of Punishment in Socratic Philosophy. Apeiron 30 (4):95 - 107.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  14
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (2001). Cross-Examining Socrates. Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):179-182.
  48.  3
    Thomas C. Brickhouse (1992). Socrates. Teaching Philosophy 15 (4):397-399.
  49.  16
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1983). Justice and Dishonesty in Plato'srepublic. Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):79-95.
    In this paper we explore plato's paradoxical remarks about the philosophical rulers' use of dishonesty in the "republic"--Rulers who, On the one hand, Are said to love truth above all else, But on the other hand are encouraged to make frequent use of "medicinal lies." we establish first that plato's remarks are in fact consistent, According to the relevant platonic theories too often forgotten by both critics and defenders of plato. Finally, We reformulate the underlying moral issue of the purported (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  5
    Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2004). Danielle Archibugi and Bengt-Ake Lundvall, Eds., The Globalizing Learn-Ing Economy. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 307 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-19-925817-1 (Pb). Simon Blackburn, Being Good. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003, 162 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-19-285377-5 (Pb). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 38:285-286.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 66