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Thomas A. Cavanaugh [14]Thomas Cavanaugh [2]
  1. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (forthcoming). Aquinas's Account of Double Effect. The Thomist.
    Double-effect reasoning (DER) is attributed to Aquinas "tout court". Aquinas's account, however, differs from contemporary DER insofar as Thomas considers the ethical status of "risking" an assailant's life while contemporary accounts focus on actions causing harm inevitably. Since one cannot claim to risk the inevitable, and since there is a significant difference between risking harm and causing harm inevitably. Thomas's account does not extend to cases of inevitable harm. Thus, the received understanding of Aquinas's account is flawed and leads to (...)
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  2. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (2011). Double-Effect Reasoning, Craniotomy, and Vital Conflicts. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (3):453-464.
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  3. E. Christian Brugger, Donald Marquis, Thomas Cavanaugh, James Nelson, Tod Chambers, Lennart Nordenfelt, James Childress, Anders Nordgren, Kai Draper & Fredrik Svenaeus (2006). Lazare Benaroyo Alex John London Universite de Lausanne Carnegie Mellon University Jeff Blustein Jeff McMahan Albert Einstein College of Medicine Rutgers. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27:1.
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  4. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (2005). How We Act. International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (2):266-268.
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  5. M. L. S. Bette Anton, Claire Brett, Michele A. Carter, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Pieter de Vries Robbe, Richard Gorlin, Michael L. Gross & Matti Häyry (2001). Carlos Aldana-Valenzuela, MD, is Chief of the Department of Neonatology at the Hospital de Ginecopediatria of the Instituto Mexicano Del Seguro Social in Leon, Guanajuato, Mexico. He is Also a Member of the Center for Studies in Bioethics at the University of Guanajuato. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10:3-5.
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  6. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (2001). Expanding Boundaries. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):121-122.
    Itself a topic of constant comment, the Internet's implications for healthcare remain unclear even while its boundaries incessantly expand. The WorldWide Web and allied technologies such as telephony are clearly permanent fixtures of our world. These technologies have changed our ways of life and demonstrate further dynamic capacities to do so. They speak of what we shall be, but know not.
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  7. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (2001). The Instability of the Standard Justification for Physician-Assisted Suicide. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):103-109.
    Proponents commonly justify the legalization of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in terms of a patient's wanting to die (autonomy) and the patient's having a medically established good reason for suicide. These are the common elements of the standard justification offered for the legalization of PAS. In what follows, I argue that these two conditions exist in significant tension with one another, operating according to distinct dynamics that render the justification for PAS an unstable basis for public policy. Moreover, no natural connection (...)
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  8. Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Jean E. Chambers, Tony Cornford, Leonard M. Fleck, Matti Häyry & Thomas K. Hazlet (2001). Mary HM Bach is a Student in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Washington, Seattle. Keith A. Bauer, MSW, is a Graduate Student in the Department of Philosophy/Medical Ethics at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. His Dissertation Addresses the Ethics and Social Dimensions of Home-Based Telemedicine, the Use of Infor. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10:123-124.
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  9. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (2000). Genetics and Fair Use Codes for Electronic Information. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (2):121-123.
    This paper concerns the deficiencies of currentlyaccepted principles governing the fair use ofelectronically recorded data when applied to geneticinformation. Principles are proposed by which to dealwith the unique group-characteristics of geneticinformation.
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  10. Thomas Cavanaugh (1999). Double Effect and the End-Not-Means Principle: A Response to Bennett. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):181–185.
  11. Arthur L. Caplan, Thomas A. Cavanaugh, Mildred K. Cho, Steve Heilig, John Hubert, Kenneth V. Iserson, Tom Koch & Mark G. Kuczewski (1998). David Buehler, M. Div., MA, is Founder of Bioethika Online Publishers and Also Serves as Chaplain to the University Lutheran Ministry of Providence, Rhode Island. Michael M. Burgess, Ph. D., is Chair in Biomedical Ethics, Centre for Applied Ethics at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:335-336.
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  12. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (1998). Currently Accepted Practices That Are Known to Lead to Death, and PAS: Is There an Ethically Relevant Difference? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):375-381.
    A number of common and generally noncontroversial practices in the care of patients at the end of life lead to their deaths. For example, physicians honor a patient's refusal of medical intervention even when doing so leads to the patient's death. Similarly, with a patient's or surrogate's consent, physicians administer sedatives in order to relieve pain and distress at the end of life, even when it is known that doing so will cause the patient's death. In contemporary U.S. public policy, (...)
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  13. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (1997). Act Evaluation, Willing and Double Effect. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 71:243-253.
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  14. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (1997). The Nazi! Accusation and Current US Proposals. Bioethics 11 (3-4):291-297.
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  15. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (1996). The Intended/Foreseen Distinction's Ethical Relevance. Philosophical Papers 25 (3):179-188.
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  16. Thomas A. Cavanaugh (1995). R. Jay Wallace, Responsibility and the Moral Sentiments Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (4):296-298.
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