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  1. Thomas Dixon (2012). “Emotion”: One Word, Many Concepts. Emotion Review 4 (4):387-388.
    The target articles and commentaries reveal considerable support for the view that the term “emotion” names neither a natural kind nor a coherent psychological category. This brief response revisits a couple of historical points about the meanings of “emotion,” as well as the ancient debate between Stoicism and Christianity.
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  2. Thomas Dixon (2012). “Emotion”: The History of a Keyword in Crisis. Emotion Review 4 (4):1754073912445814.
    The word “emotion” has named a psychological category and a subject for systematic enquiry only since the 19th century. Before then, relevant mental states were categorised variously as “appetites,” “passions,” “affections,” or “sentiments.” The word “emotion” has existed in English since the 17th century, originating as a translation of the French émotion, meaning a physical disturbance. It came into much wider use in 18th-century English, often to refer to mental experiences, becoming a fully fledged theoretical term in the following century, (...)
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  3. Thomas Dixon (2012). La science du cerveau et la religion de l'Humanité : Auguste Comte et l'altruisme dans l'Angleterre victorienne. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 2:287-316.
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  4. Thomas Dixon (2011). Revolting Passions. Modern Theology 27 (2):298-312.
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  5. Jonathan R. Cohen, All-Too-Human Human, Zdenek V. David, John Deely, Thomas Dixon, Geoffrey Cantor, Stephen Pumfrey, Christi Favor, Gerald Gaus & Julian Lamont (2010). Alexandrescu, Vlad, Editor. Branching Off: The Early Moderns in Quest for the Unity of Knowledge. Bucharest: Zeta Books, 2009. Pp. 409. Paper,£ 19.16. Alexandrescu, Vlad, and Robert Theis, Editors. Nature Et Surnaturel: Philosophies de la Nature Et Métaphy-Sique aux XVIe-XVIIIe Siècles. Europaea Memoria I, 79. Hildesheim-Zürich-New York: Georg Olms, 2010. Pp. 199. Paper,€ 34.80. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):541-44.
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  6. Thomas Dixon (2009). Full-On Fuller. Metascience 18 (1):103-105.
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  7. Thomas Dixon (2008). The Invention of Altruism: Making Moral Meanings in Victorian Britain. Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press.
    'Altruism' was coined by the French sociologist Auguste Comte in the early 1850s as a theoretical term in his 'cerebral theory' and as the central ideal of his atheistic 'Religion of Humanity'. In The Invention of Altruism, Thomas Dixon traces this new language of 'altruism' as it spread through British culture between the 1850s and the 1900s, and in doing so provides a new portrait of Victorian moral thought. Drawing attention to the importance of Comtean positivism in setting the agenda (...)
     
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  8. Thomas Dixon (2003). From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category. Cambridge University Press.
    Today there is a thriving 'emotions industry' to which philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists are contributing. Yet until two centuries ago 'the emotions' did not exist. In this path-breaking study Thomas Dixon shows how, during the nineteenth century, the emotions came into being as a distinct psychological category, replacing existing categories such as appetites, passions, sentiments and affections. By examining medieval and eighteenth-century theological psychologies and placing Charles Darwin and William James within a broader and more complex nineteenth-century setting, Thomas Dixon (...)
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  9. Thomas Dixon (1999). Theology, Anti‐Theology and Atheology: From Christian Passions to Secular Emotions. Modern Theology 15 (3):297-330.
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