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Thomas E. Hill [41]Thomas E. Hill Jr [23]
  1. Thomas E. Hill (forthcoming). Conscientious Conviction and Conscience. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-16.
    In this paper, I examine critically Kimberley Brownlee’s descriptive criteria for identifying when a person has a conscientious moral conviction. Then, I contrast her conception of conscience with other ideas of conscience, including a religious conception, a relativist conception, and those of Butler and Kant. The concepts examined here are central in her argument that, if civil disobedience is grounded in citizens’ conscience-based conscientious convictions, then it deserves legal and moral protection.
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  2. Thomas E. Hill (2013). Punishment and the Moral Emotions: Essays in Law, Morality, and Religion, by Jeffrie G. Murphy. Faith and Philosophy 30 (4):490-493.
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  3. Thomas E. Hill, The Importance of Moral Rules and Principles.
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 2006, given by Thomas E. Hill, Jr., an American philosopher.
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  4. Thomas E. Hill (2012). Virtue, Rules, and Justice: Kantian Aspirations. Oxford University Press.
    General introduction -- I. Basic themes. Kant's ethical theory : an overview ; Kantian normative ethics ; Kantian constructivism as normative ethics -- II. Virtue. Finding value in nature ; Kant on weakness of will ; Kantian virtue and "virtue ethics" ; Kant's Tugendlehre as normative ethics -- III. Moral rules and principles. The dignity of persons : Kant, problems, and a proposal ; Assessing moral rules : utilitarian and Kantian perspectives ; The importance of moral rules and principles ; (...)
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  5. Thomas E. Hill Jr (2010). Moral Responsibilities of Bystanders. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (1):28-39.
  6. Thomas E. Hill Jr (2009). Introduction. In Thomas E. Hill (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  7. Thomas E. Hill (2008). Moral Construction as a Task: Sources and Limits. Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):214-236.
    This essay first distinguishes different questions regarding moral objectivity and relativism and then sketches a broadly Kantian position on two of these questions. First, how, if at all, can we derive, justify, or support specific moral principles and judgments from more basic moral standards and values? Second, how, if at all, can the basic standards such as my broadly Kantian perspective, be defended? Regarding the first question, the broadly Kantian position is that from ideas in Kant's later formulations of the (...)
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  8. Thomas E. Hill Jr (2005). Assessing Moral Rules: Utilitarian and Kantian Perspectives. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):158–178.
  9. Thomas E. Hill & Arnulf Zweig (2003). Editors' Introduction: Some Main Themes of the Groundwork. In Jr Hill & Arnulf Zweig (eds.), Immanuel Kant: Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. Oup Oxford.
     
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  10. Thomas E. Hill (2002). Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how valuable moral theory (...)
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  11. Thomas E. Hill (2002). Questions About Kant's Opposition to Revolution. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):283-298.
  12. Thomas E. Hill Jr (2001). Collected Papers. Journal of Philosophy 98 (5):269-272.
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  13. Thomas E. Hill (2001). Autonomy of Moral Agents. In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), Encyclopedia of Ethics. Routledge.
     
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  14. Thomas E. Hill (2001). Hypothetical Consent in Kantian Constructivism. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (02):300-.
    Epistemology, as I understand it, is a branch of philosophy especially concerned with general questions about how we can know various things or at least justify our beliefs about them. It questions what counts as evidence and what are reasonable sources of doubt. Traditionally, episte-mology focuses on pervasive and apparently basic assumptions covering a wide range of claims to knowledge or justified belief rather than very specific, practical puzzles. For example, traditional epistemologists ask “How do we know there are material (...)
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  15. R. G. Frey, Brad Hooker, F. M. Kamm, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, David McNaughton, Jan Narveson, Michael Slote, Alison M. Jaggar & William R. Schroeder (2000). Normative Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell Publishers.
     
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  16. Thomas E. Hill (2000). Respect, Pluralism, and Justice: Kantian Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Respect, Pluralism, and Justice is a series of essays which sketches a broadly Kantian framework for moral deliberation, and then uses it to address important social and political issues. Hill shows how Kantian theory can be developed to deal with questions about cultural diversity, punishment, political violence, responsibility for the consequences of wrongdoing, and state coercion in a pluralistic society.
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  17. Thomas E. Hill (1999). Happiness and Human Flourishing in Kant's Ethics. Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (01):143-.
    Ancient moral philosophers, especially Aristotle and his followers, typically shared the assumption that ethics is primarily concerned with how to achieve the final end for human beings, a life of “happiness” or “human flourishing.” This final end was not a subjective condition, such as contentment or the satisfaction of our preferences, but a life that could be objectively determined to be appropriate to our nature as human beings. Character traits were treated as moral virtues because they contributed well toward this (...)
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  18. Thomas E. Hill (1999). Kant on Wrongdoing, Desert, and Punishment. Law and Philosophy 18 (4):407 - 441.
  19. Thomas E. Hill (1998). Punishment, Conscience, and Moral Worth. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):51-71.
  20. Thomas E. Hill (1997). A Kantian Perspective on Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105 - 140.
    Rejecting Kant''s absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant''s basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for moral legislation that combines the core ideas of each of Kant''s formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant''s hopes, the values implicit (...)
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  21. Thomas E. Hill (1997). Reasonable Self-Interest. Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (01):52-.
    Philosophers have debated for millennia about whether moral requirements are always rational to follow. The background for these debates is often what I shall call “the self-interest model.” The guiding assumption here is that the basic demand of reason, to each person, is that one must, above all, advance one's self-interest. Alternatively, debate may be framed by a related, but significantly different, assumption: the idea that the basic rational requirement is to develop and pursue a set of personal ends in (...)
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  22. Graham Bird, Sarah Gibbons, Paul Guyer, Dieter Henrich, Thomas E. Hill, Otfried Hoffe, Marshall Farrier, Hud Hudson, Patricia Kitcher, Susan Neiman, Allen D. Rosen & John H. Zammito (1996). Recent Books on Kant: Kant's Theory of Imagination; Kant and the Experience of Freedom; Aesthetic Judgement and the Moral Image of the World; Dignity and Practical Reason; Immanuel Kant; Kant's Compatibilism; Kant's Transcendental Psychology; The Unity of Reason; Kant's Theory of Justice. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):226.
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  23. Sarah Gibbons, Paul Guyer, Dieter Henrich, Thomas E. Hill & Marshall Farrier (1996). Kant's Theory of Imagination. Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):226-237.
     
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  24. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1995). The Practice of Moral Judgment by Barbara Herman. Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):47-51.
  25. Thomas E. Hill (1995). Is a Good Will Overrated? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):299-317.
  26. Thomas E. Hill (1994). The Problem of Stability in Political Liberalism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75:333-352.
     
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  27. Thomas E. Hill (1994). The Stability Problem in Political Liberalism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75 (3-4):333-352.
     
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  28. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1993). Donagan's Kant. Ethics 104 (1):22-52.
  29. Thomas E. Hill (1993). Beneficence and Self-Love: A Kantian Perspective. Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):1-23.
    What, if anything, are we morally required to do on behalf of others besides respecting their rights? And why is such regard for others a reasonable moral requirement? These two questions have long been major concerns of ethical theory, but the answers that philosophers give tend to vary with their beliefs about human nature. More specifically, their answers typically depend on the position they take on a third-question: To what extent, if any, is it possible for us to act altruistically?
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  30. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1992). A Kantian Perspective on Moral Rules. Philosophical Perspectives 6:285-304.
  31. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1992). Kantian Pluralism. Ethics 102 (4):743-762.
  32. Thomas E. Hill (1992). Dignity and Practical Reason in Kant's Moral Theory. Cornell University Press.
  33. Thomas E. Hill, Gerald J. Postema & Jay F. Rosenberg (1992). W. David Falk 1906-1991. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 66 (1):25 - 27.
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  34. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1991). What Reason Demands by Rudiger Bittner. Journal of Philosophy 88 (9):497-501.
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  35. Thomas E. Hill (1991). Autonomy and Self-Respect. Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating collection of essays in ethics eschews the simple exposition and refinement of abstract theories. Rather, the author focuses on everyday moral issues, often neglected by philosophers, and explores the deeper theoretical questions which they raise. Such issues are: Is it wrong to tell a lie to protect someone from a painful truth? Should one commit a lesser evil to prevent another from doing something worse? Can one be both autonomous and compassionate? Other topics discussed are servility, weakness of (...)
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  36. Thomas E. Hill (1991). The Message of Affirmative Action. Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (02):108-.
    Affirmative action programs remain controversial, I suspect, partly because the familiar arguments for and against them start from significantly different moral perspectives. Thus I want to step back for a while from the details of debate about particular programs and give attention to the moral viewpoints presupposed in different types of argument. My aim, more specifically, is to compare the “messages” expressed when affirmative action is defended from different moral perspectives. Exclusively forward-looking arguments, I suggest, tend to express the wrong (...)
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  37. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1989). Kant's Theory of Practical Reason. The Monist 72 (3):363-383.
  38. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1989). Kantian Constructivism in Ethics. Ethics 99 (4):752-770.
  39. Eva Feder Kittay, Carol Gilligan, Annette C. Baier, Michael Stocker, Christina H. Sommers, Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Virginia Held, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Seyla Benhabib, George Sher, Marilyn Friedman, Jonathan Adler, Sara Ruddick, Mary Fainsod, David D. Laitin, Lizbeth Hasse & Sandra Harding (1989). Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
     
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  40. Thomas E. Hill (1987). Hugo Wilfred Thompson 1900 - 1987. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 60 (5):865 - 866.
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  41. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1986). Review: Darwall on Practical Reason. [REVIEW] Ethics 96 (3):604-619.
  42. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1985). Kant's Argument for the Rationality of Moral Conduct. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 66 (1-2):3.
     
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  43. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1984). Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 6 (4):367-371.
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  44. Thomas E. Hill (1984). Autonomy and Benevolent Lies. Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (4):251-267.
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  45. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1983). Moral Purity and the Lesser Evil. The Monist 66 (2):213-232.
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  46. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1983). Ideals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments. Environmental Ethics 5 (3):211-224.
    The moral significance of preserving natural environments is not entirely an issue of rights and social utility, for a person’s attitude toward nature may be importantly connected with virtues or human excellences. The question is, “What sort of person would destroy the natural environment--or even see its value solely in cost/benefit terms?” The answer I suggest is that willingness to do so may well reveal the absence of traits which are a natural basis for a proper humility, self-acceptance, gratitude, and (...)
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  47. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1982). Self-Respect Reconsidered. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 31:129-137.
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  48. Thomas E. Hill (1980). Humanity as an End in Itself. Ethics 91 (1):84 - 99.
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