12 found
Sort by:
  1. Thomas Maak & Nicolas Stoetter (2012). Social Entrepreneurs as Responsible Leaders: 'Fundación Paraguaya' and the Case of Martin Burt. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):413-430.
    A country known for its longstanding struggle with corruption and dubious governments may not be the obvious venue for a socio-economic revolution that is expected to play an important role in the elimination of global poverty. However, Paraguay, an 'island without shores', as the writer Augusto Roa Bastos once described it, is home to one of the world's most innovative social enterprises—the Fundación Paraguaya. While its achievements and success are the result of a team effort, its remarkable development can be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Nicola M. Pless & Thomas Maak (2011). Responsible Leadership: Pathways to the Future. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):3-13.
    This article maps current thinking in the emerging field of responsible leadership. Various environmental and social forces have triggered interest in both research and practices of responsible leadership. This article outlines the main features of the relevant research, specifies a definition of the concept, and compares this emergent understanding of responsible leadership with related leadership theories. Finally, an overview of different articles in this special issue sketches some pathways for ongoing research.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Nicola M. Pless, Thomas Maak & Derick de Jongh (2011). Foreword to Special Issue on �Responsible Leadership�. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):1-2.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Nicola M. Pless, Thomas Maak & Derick Jongh (2011). Foreword to Special Issue on 'Responsible Leadership'. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):1-1.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Thomas Maak (2009). The Cosmopolitical Corporation. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):361 - 372.
    In light of recent attempts to determine the political role and status of corporations I discuss the normative implications of considering multinational corporations (MNCs) as political actors. I posit that corporations do indeed have a new political role in a connected world, in particular with respect to matters of human rights, social and environmental justice. We thus find a growing need for ethical and political knowledge to inform and guide the emerging political co-responsibility of MNCs. I draw on the rich (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Thomas Maak & Nicola M. Pless (2009). Business Leaders as Citizens of the World. Advancing Humanism on a Global Scale. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):537 - 550.
    As the world is getting increasingly connected and interdependent it becomes clear that the world’s most pressing public problems such as poverty or global warming call for cross-sector solutions. The paper discusses the idea of business leaders acting as agents of world benefit, taking an active co-responsibility in generating solutions to problems. It argues that we need responsible global leaders who are aware of the pressing problems in the world, care for the needs of others, aspire to make this world (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Nicola Pless & Thomas Maak (2009). Responsible Leaders as Agents of World Benefit: Learnings From "Project Ulysses". [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):59 - 71.
    There is widespread agreement in both business and society that MNCs have an enormous potential for contributing to the betterment of the world (WBCSD: 2006, From Challenge to Opportunity, in L. Timberlake (ed.), A paper from the Tomorrow's Leaders Group of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development). In fact, a discussion has evolved around the role of "Business as an Agent of World Benefit."¹ At the same time, there is also growing willingness among business leaders to spend time, expertise, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Thomas Maak (2008). Undivided Corporate Responsibility: Towards a Theory of Corporate Integrity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):353 - 368.
    In the years since Enron corporate social responsibility, or “CSR,” has become a ubiquitous phenomenon in both research and business practice. CSR is used as an umbrella term to describe much of what is done in terms of ethics-related activities in firms around the globe to such an extent that some consider it a “tortured concept” (Godfrey and Hatch 2007, Journal of Business Ethics 70, 87–98). Addressing this skepticism, I argue in this article that the focus on CSR is indeed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Thomas Maak (2007). Responsible Leadership, Stakeholder Engagement, and the Emergence of Social Capital. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):329 - 343.
    I argue in this article that responsible leadership (Maak and Pless, 2006) contributes to building social capital and ultimately to both a sustainable business and the common good. I show, first, that responsible leadership in a global stakeholder society is a relational and inherently moral phenomenon that cannot be captured in traditional dyadic leader–follower relationships (e.g., to subordinates) or by simply focusing on questions of leadership effectiveness. Business leaders have to deal with moral complexity resulting from a multitude of stakeholder (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Thomas Maak & Luc Van Liedekerke (2007). Ethics in and of Global Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):301-301.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Thomas Maak & Nicola M. Pless (2006). Responsible Leadership in a Stakeholder Society – a Relational Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 66 (1):99 - 115.
    We understand responsible leadership as a social-relational and ethical phenomenon, which occurs in social processes of interaction. While the prevailing leadership literature has for the most part focussed on the relationship between leaders and followers in the organization and defined followers as subordinates, we show in this article that leadership takes place in interaction with a multitude of followers as stakeholders inside and outside the corporation. Using an ethical lens, we discuss leadership responsibilities in a stakeholder society, thereby following Bass (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Nicola Pless & Thomas Maak (2004). Building an Inclusive Diversity Culture: Principles, Processes and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):129 - 147.
    In management theory and business practice, the dealing with diversity, especially a diverse workforce, has played a prominent role in recent years. In a globalizing economy companies recognized potential benefits of a multicultural workforce and tried to create more inclusive work environments. However, many organizations have been disappointed with the results they have achieved in their efforts to meet the diversity challenge [Cox: 2001, Creating the Multicultural Organization (Jossey-Bass, San Francisco)]. We see the reason for this in the fact that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation