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  1. Thomas May, Kaija L. Zusevics, Arthur Derse, Kimberly A. Strong, Jessica Jeruzal, Alison La Pean Kirschner, Michael H. Farrell & Ryan Spellecy (2014). The Limits of Traditional Approaches to Informed Consent for Genomic Medicine. HEC Forum 26 (3):185-202.
    This paper argues that it will be important for new genomic technologies to recognize the limits of traditional approaches to informed consent, so that other-regarding implications of genomic information can be properly contextualized and individual rights respected. Respect for individual autonomy will increasingly require dynamic consideration of the interrelated dimensions of individual and broader community interests, so that the interests of one do not undermine fundamental interests of the other. In this, protection of individual rights will be a complex interplay (...)
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  2. Kimberly A. Strong, Arthur R. Derse, David P. Dimmock, Kaija L. Zusevics, Jessica Jeruzal, Elizabeth Worthey, David Bick, Gunter Scharer, Alison La Pean Kirschner, Ryan Spellecy, Michael H. Farrell, Jennifer Geurts, Regan Veith & Thomas May (2014). In the Absence of Evidentiary Harm, Existing Societal Norms Regarding Parental Authority Should Prevail. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (3):24-26.
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  3. Thomas May (2012). Rethinking Clinical Risk for DNA Sequencing. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):24-26.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 24-26, October 2012.
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  4. Ryan Spellecy & Thomas May (2012). More Than Cheating: Deception, IRB Shopping, and the Normative Legitimacy of IRBs. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):990-996.
    Deception, cheating, and loopholes within the IRB approval process have received significant attention in the past several years. Surveys of clinical researchers indicate common deception ranging from omitting information to outright lying, and controversy surrounding the FDA's decision not to ban “IRB shopping” (the practice of submitting protocols to multiple IRBs until one is found that will approve the protocol) has raised legitimate concerns about the integrity of the IRB process. While at first blush these practices seem to cast aspersions (...)
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  5. Heidi Malm, Thomas May, Leslie P. Francis, Saad B. Omer, Daniel A. Salmon & Robert Hood (2008). Ethics, Pandemics, and the Duty to Treat. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):4 – 19.
    Numerous grounds have been offered for the view that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, including expressed consent, implied consent, special training, reciprocity (also called the social contract view), and professional oaths and codes. Quite often, however, these grounds are simply asserted without being adequately defended or without the defenses being critically evaluated. This essay aims to help remedy that problem by providing a critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses of each of these five grounds for asserting that (...)
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  6. Thomas May & Mark P. Aulisio (2008). Personal Morality and Professional Obligations: Rights of Conscience and Informed Consent. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (1):30-38.
  7. Ryan Spellecy, L. Eugene Arnold & Thomas May (2008). Children and Parents as Members of the Research Team: Fair Employment Practices Without a Union Contract. Ethics and Behavior 18 (2 & 3):199 – 214.
    In clinical mental health research with children, both child and parent are essential members of the research team. The 3 R's of parent/child team membership are respect, rapport, and recognition. Respect and recognition include fair reimbursement for time, expense, and inconvenience, but the most important compensation for many families is the appreciation of the other team members for their sacrifice and cooperation. Reimbursement, although honoring the principles of justice and respect for persons, raises difficult issues about appropriate amount, particularly in (...)
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  8. Thomas May (2007). Intelligence, Foreign Health Aid, and Bioterror Defence. Theoria 54 (114):102-117.
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  9. Jana M. Craig & Thomas May (2006). Ethics Consultation as a Tool for Teaching Residents. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):25 – 27.
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  10. Thomas May (2006). Bioterror and Public Health Infrastructure: A Response to Commentators. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):W29-W31.
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  11. Thomas May & Ryan Spellecy (2006). Autonomy, Full Information, and Genetic Ignorance in Reproductive Medicine. The Monist 89 (4):466-481.
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  12. J. M. Craig & Thomas May (2005). Evaluating the Outcomes of Ethics Consultation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):168-180.
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  13. Thomas May (2005). Funding Agendas: Has Bioterror Defense Been Over-Prioritized? American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):34 – 44.
    Post-9/11, concern about bioterrorism has transformed public health from unappreciated to a central component of national security. Within the War on Terror, bioterrorism preparedness has taken a back seat only to direct military action in terms of funding. Domestically, homelessness, joblessness, crime, education, and race relations are just a few of a litany of pressing issues requiring government attention. Even within the biomedical sciences and healthcare, issues surrounding the fact that more than 40 million Americans lack health insurance, the rising (...)
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  14. Thomas May (2005). Public Communication, Risk Perception, and the Viability of Preventive Vaccination Against Communicable Diseases. Bioethics 19 (4):407-421.
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  15. Thomas May (2005). The Concept of Autonomy in Bioethics: An Unwarranted Fall From Grace. In J. Stacey Taylor (ed.), Personal Autonomy: New Essays on Personal Autonomy and its Role in Contemporary Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 299--309.
     
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  16. Thomas May, J. M. Craig, Carol May & John Tomkowiak (2005). Quality of Life, Justice, and the Demands of Hospital-Based Nursing. Public Affairs Quarterly 19 (3):213-225.
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  17. Renita Coleman & Thomas May (2004). Professional-Client Relationships: Rethinking Confidentiality, Harm, and Journalists' Public Health Duties. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):276 – 292.
    Journalists seldom consider the layers of those affected by their actions; third parties such as families, children, and even people unlucky enough to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. This article argues for consideration of the broader group, considering a range of options available for doing their duty to inform the public while also minimizing harm to others. Journalists might compare themselves with other professions that have similar roles, such as anthropologists, on such issues as confidentiality and (...)
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  18. Thomas May (2004). Political Authority in a Bioterror Emergency. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):159-163.
  19. Thomas May (2004). Social Restrictions on Informed Consent: Research Ethics and Medical Decision Making. HEC Forum 16 (1):38-44.
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  20. Thomas May (2003). Public Health in an Era of Terrorism: The IOM Report on Public-Health Infrastructure. Institute of Medicine. 2003. The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 3 (4):10 – 14.
  21. Thomas May, Mark P. Aulisio & Ross D. Silverman (2003). The Smallpox Vaccination of Health Care Workers: Professional Obligations and Defense Against Bioterrorism. Hastings Center Report 33 (5):26-33.
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  22. Thomas May & Ross D. Silverman (2003). Should Smallpox Vaccine Be Made Available to the General Public? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):67-82.
    : In June 2002, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved draft recommendations concerning preparation for potential biological terror attacks that utilize the smallpox virus. ACIP recommends against both mandatory and voluntary vaccination of the general public. The present paper examines the moral and political considerations both for and against each of the general public vaccination options considered by the ACIP in the context of the state's authority over vaccination for the purposes of protecting public health. Although it is (...)
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  23. Thomas May (2002). Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Issues concerning patients' rights are at the center of bioethics, but the political basis for these rights has rarely been examined. In Bioethics in a Liberal Society: The Political Framework of Bioethics Decision Making , Thomas May offers a compelling analysis of how the political context of liberal constitutional democracy shapes the rights and obligations of both patients and health care professionals. May focuses on how a key feature of liberal society -- namely, an individual's right to make independent decisions (...)
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  24. Mark P. Aulisio, Thomas May & Geoffrey D. Block (2001). Procreation for Donation: The Moral and Political Permissibility of “Having a Child to Save a Child”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):408-419.
    The crisis in donor organ and tissue supply is one of the most difficult challenges for transplant today. New policy initiatives, such as the driver's license option and requiredrequest, have been implemented in many states, with other initiatives, such as mandatedchoice and presumedconsent, proposed in the hopes of ameliorating this crisis. At the same time, traditional acquisition of organs from human cadavers has been augmented by living human donors, and nonheartbeating human donors, as well as experimental animal and artificial sources. (...)
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  25. Michael Devita, Mark P. Aulisio & Thomas May (2001). Transplantation Ethics: Old Questions, New Answers? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):357-360.
    The first reported successful kidney transplantation occurred in 1954, between twins. Since then, organ donation and transplantation has become less a medical marvel than a common expectation of patients with a variety of diseases resulting in organ failure. Those expectations have caused demand for organs to skyrocket far beyond available supply, fueling an organ shortage and resulting in over 60,000 patients on transplant waiting lists. In this special issue, our contributors attempt to shed new light on some of the many (...)
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  26. Thomas May (2001). Rights of Conscience in Health Care. Social Theory and Practice 27 (1):111-128.
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  27. Thomas May (2001). The Breadth of Bioethics: Core Areas of Bioethics Education for Hospital Ethics Committees. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):101 – 118.
    The multidisciplinary nature of bioethics can result in narrow sub-specialists within the field, whose work reflects the issues and concerns most relevant to their home discipline. This can result in work which is insensitive to the important ways in which particular areas of bioethics are interrelated, and which (while viable in the context of the sub-specialty) is not viable in a broader context. The narrow focus of many healthcare ethics committees on issues directly related to clinical patient care can exacerbate (...)
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  28. Thomas May & Mark P. Aulisio (2001). Medical Malpractice, Mistake Prevention, and Compensation. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2):135-146.
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  29. Michael A. DeVita & Thomas May (2000). Decisions by Conscious Persons About Controlled NHBD After Death: Eyes Wide Open. Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (1):85.
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  30. Thomas May (1999). Bioethics in a Liberal Society. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (1):1-19.
    This paper argues for the importance of the political context of a society for bioethics. In particular, I argue that in a liberal constitutional society, such as the one we find ourselves in, no particular moral perspective is granted a privileged position. Rather, individuals are allowed to live their lives according to values they adopt for themselves, and the rights granted to protect this ability “trump” social consensus, and place boundaries on the social application of personal moral beliefs and values.
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  31. Thomas May (1999). Response to “Advance Directives and Voluntary Slavery” by Christopher Tollefsen (CQ Vol 7, No 4). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (03):358-363.
    In an interesting response to an article I published in CQ that questions the ability of advance directives to reflect autonomy, Christopher Tollefsen raises a number of issues that deserve greater attention. Tollefsen offers several examples to illustrate how the critique of advance directives I offer would also threaten other choices that most people would consider autonomous. Importantly, I largely agree that the examples Tollefsen offers should be captured as autonomous. Where I disagree, however, is whether these examples reflect the (...)
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  32. Thomas May (1997). Reassessing the Reliability of Advance Directives. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (03):325-.
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  33. Thomas May (1995). Sovereignty and International Order. Ratio Juris 8 (3):287-295.
  34. Thomas May (1994). The Concept of Autonomy. American Philosophical Quarterly 31 (2):133 - 144.
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