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  1. Thomas Nagel, Agent-Relativity and Deontology.
    In this chapter I want to take up some of the problems that must be faced by any defender of the objectivity of ethics who wishes to make sense of the actual complexity of the subject. The treatment will be general and very incomplete. Essentially I shall discuss some examples in order to suggest that the enterprise is not hopeless.
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  2. Thomas Nagel (forthcoming). What Makes a Political Theory Utopian? Social Research.
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  3. Thomas Nagel & Brenda Almond (forthcoming). Editor's Booknotes. Cogito.
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  4. Thomas Nagel (2012). Mind and Cosmos. Oxford Up.
    In Mind and Cosmos, Thomas Nagel argues that the widely accepted world view of materialist naturalism is untenable.
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  5. Thomas Nagel (2010). Secular Philosophy and the Religious Temperament: Essays 2002-2008. Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects recent essays and reviews by Thomas Nagel in three subject areas.
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  6. Thomas Nagel (2009). Free Will. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
  7. Thomas Nagel (2009). Right and Wrong. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  8. Thomas Nagel (2008). Public Education and Intelligent Design. Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (2):187-205.
    i The 2005 decision by Judge John E. Jones in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District was celebrated by all red-blooded American liberals as a victory over the forces of darkness. The result was probably inevitable, in view of the reckless expression by some members of the Dover School Board of their desire to put religion into the classroom, and the clumsiness of their prescribed statement in trying to dissimulate that aim.1 But the conflicts aired in this trial—over the status (...)
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  9. Thomas Nagel (2008). The Value of Inviolability. In Paul Bloomfield (ed.), Morality and Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.
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  10. David Benatar, Cheshire Calhoun, Louise Collins, John Corvino, Yolanda Estes, John Finnis, Deirdre Golash, Alan Goldman, Greta Christina, Raja Halwani, Christopher Hamilton, Eva Feder Kittay, Howard Klepper, Andrew Koppelman, Stanley Kurtz, Thomas Mappes, Joan Mason-Grant, Janice Moulton, Thomas Nagel, Jerome Neu, Martha Nussbaum, Alan Soble, Sallie Tisdale, Alan Wertheimer, Robin West & Karol Wojtyla (2007). Philosophy of Sex: Contemporary Readings. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  11. Thomas Nagel (2007). C. Consciousness. In John Perry, Michael Bratman & John Martin Fischer (eds.), Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. 354.
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  12. Thomas Nagel (2007). The Incompleteness of Objective Reality. In Brie Gertler & Lawrence A. Shapiro (eds.), Arguing About the Mind. Routledge. 4--36.
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  13. Thomas Nagel (2005). The Problem of Global Justice. Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (2):113–147.
    We do not live in a just world. This may be the least controversial claim one could make in political theory. But it is much less clear what, if anything, justice on a world scale might mean, or what the hope for justice should lead us to want in the domain of international or global institutions, and in the policies of states that are in a position to affect the world order. By comparison with the perplexing and undeveloped state of (...)
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  14. Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams (2004). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  15. Thomas Nagel (2004). Concealment and Exposure: And Other Essays. OUP USA.
    Thomas Nagel is widely recognized as one of the top American philosophers working today. Reflecting the diversity of his many philosophical preoccupations, this volume is a collection of his most recent critical essays and reviews. The first section, Public and Private, focuses on the notion of privacy in the context of social and political issues, such as the impeachment of President Clinton. The second section, Right and Wrong, discusses moral, political and legal theory, and includes pieces on John Rawls, G.A. (...)
     
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  16. Thomas Nagel (2004). Liberdade 2: autonomia. Crítica.
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  17. Thomas Nagel (2004). Liberdade 1: dois problemas. Crítica.
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  18. Thomas Nagel (2004). Liberdade 3: responsabilidade. Crítica.
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  19. Bruce Ackerman, Richard J. Arneson, Ronald Dworkin, Gerald F. Gaus, Kent Greenawalt, Vinit Haksar, Thomas Hurka, George Klosko, Charles Larmore, Stephen Macedo, Thomas Nagel, John Rawls, Joseph Raz & George Sher (2003). Perfectionism and Neutrality: Essays in Liberal Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  20. Noam Chomsky & Thomas Nagel (2003). 14. McGinn on Consciousness and the Mind-Body Problem. In Quentin Smith & Aleksandar Jokic (eds.), Consciousness: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 396.
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  21. Thomas Nagel (2003). Freedom. In Gary Watson (ed.), Free Will. Oup Oxford.
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  22. Thomas Nagel (2003). 1 Rawls and Liberalism. In Samuel Richard Freeman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Rawls. Cambridge University Press. 62.
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  23. Thomas Nagel (2002). 10.2 Excerpt From The Last Word. Logos 5 (2).
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  24. Thomas Nagel (2002). What Is It Like to Be 25. In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. 219.
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  25. Liam B. Murphy & Thomas Nagel (2001). Taxes, Redistribution, and Public Provision. Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (1):53–71.
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  26. Thomas Nagel (2001). The Psychophysical Nexus. In Paul A. Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), New Essays on the a Priori. Oxford University Press. 433--471.
    I. The Mind-Body Problem after Kripke This essay will explore an approach to the mind-body problem that is distinct both from dualism and from the sort of conceptual reduction of the mental to the physical that proceeds via causal behaviorist or functionalist analysis of mental concepts. The essential element of the approach is that it takes the subjective phenomenological features of conscious experience to be perfectly real and not reducible to anything else--but nevertheless holds that their systematic relations to neurophysiology (...)
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  27. Thomas Nagel (2000). 1. The Mind-Body Problem After Kripke. In Paul Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), New Essays on the a Priori. Oxford University Press. 433.
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  28. Thomas Nagel (2000). The Psychophysical Nexus. In Paul A. Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), New Essays on the a New Essays on the a Priori. Oxford University Press. 433--471.
    I. The Mind-Body Problem after Kripke This essay will explore an approach to the mind-body problem that is distinct both from dualism and from the sort of conceptual reduction of the mental to the physical that proceeds via causal behaviorist or functionalist analysis of mental concepts. The essential element of the approach is that it takes the subjective phenomenological features of conscious experience to be perfectly real and not reducible to anything else--but nevertheless holds that their systematic relations to neurophysiology (...)
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  29. Thomas Nagel (1999). A objectividade da ética. Crítica.
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  30. Thomas Nagel (1999). Selection From The View From Nowhere. In Keith DeRose & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Skepticism: A Contemporary Reader. Oup Usa.
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  31. Thomas Nagel (1998). Concealment and Exposure. Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (1):3–30.
    Everyone knows that something has gone wrong, in the United States, with the conventions of privacy. Along with a vastly increased tolerance for variation in sexual life we have seen a sharp increase in prurient and censorious attention to the sexual lives of public figures and famous persons, past and present. The culture seems to be growing more tolerant and more intolerant at the same time, though perhaps different parts of it are involved in the two movements.
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  32. Thomas Nagel (1998). Conceiving the Impossible and the Mind-Body Problem. Philosophy 73 (285):337-52.
    Intuitions based on the first-person perspective can easily mislead us about what is and is not conceivable.1 This point is usually made in support of familiar reductionist positions on the mind-body problem, but I believe it can be detached from that approach. It seems to me that the powerful appearance of contingency in the relation between the functioning of the physical organism and the conscious mind -- an appearance that depends directly or indirectly on the first- person perspective -- must (...)
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  33. Thomas Nagel (1998). Value. In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 1: The Question of Objectivity. Oup Oxford.
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  34. Ronald Dworkin, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, John Rawls & Thomas Scanlon (1997). The Case for Legalised Euthanasia. The Philosophers' Magazine 1 (1):26-31.
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  35. Thomas Nagel (1997). The Last Word. OUP USA.
    If there is such a thing as reason, it has to be universal - it must work the same way for everyone. Reason must reflect objective principles whose validity is independent of our point of view. To reason is to think systematically in ways that anyone looking on ought to be able to recognize as correct. But this generality of reason is what relativists and subjectivists deny in ever-increasing numbers. And such subjectivism is not just an inconsequential intellectual flourish or (...)
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  36. Peg Brand, Myles Brand, G. E. M. Anscombe, Donald Davidson, John M. Dolan, Peter T. Geach, Thomas Nagel, Barry R. Gross, Nebojsa Kujundzic, Jon K. Mills, Stephen Lester Thompson, Richard J. McGowan, Jennifer Uleman, John D. Musselman, James S. Stramel, Parker English & Torin Alter (1995). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (2):119 - 131.
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  37. Thomas Nagel (1995). Equality and Partiality. OUP USA.
    This collection of essays, based on the Locke Lectures that Nagel delivered at Oxford University in 1990, addresses the conflict between the claims of the group and those of the individual. Nagel attempts to clarify the nature of the conflict - one of the most fundamental problems in moral and political theory - and concludes that its reconciliation is the essential task of any legitimate political system.
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  38. Thomas Nagel (1995). Other Minds: Critical Essays, 1969-1994. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past twenty-five years, Thomas Nagel has played a major role in the philosophico-biological debate on subjectivity and consciousness. This extensive collection of published essays and reviews offers Nagel's opinionated views on the philosophy of mind, epistemology, and political philosophy, as well as on fellow philosophers like Freud, Wittgenstein, Rawls, Dennet, Chomsky, Searle, Nozick, Dworkin, and MacIntyre.
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  39. Thomas Nagel (1995). Personal Rights and Public Space. Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (2):83–107.
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  40. Thomas Nagel (1995). The Problem of Autonomy. In Timothy O'Connor (ed.), Agents, Causes, and Events: Essays on Indeterminism and Free Will. Oxford University Press.
     
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  41. Thomas Nagel (1994). Consciousness and Objective Reality. In Richard Warner & Tadeusz Szubka (eds.), The Mind-Body Problem: A Guide to the Current Debate. Blackwell.
     
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  42. Thomas Nagel & François Calori (1994). La valeur de l'inviolabilité. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 99 (2):149 - 166.
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  43. Thomas Nagel (1993). Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 174).
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  44. Thomas Nagel (1993). The Mind Wins. New York Review of Books, March 4.
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  45. Thomas Nagel (1993). What is the Mind-Body Problem? In G. R. Bock & James L. Marsh (eds.), Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 174). 174--1.
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  46. Thomas Nagel (1989). Fredom and the View From Nowhere. In , The View From Nowhere. Oup.
    _The opening paragraphs of Nagel's book_ _The View from Nowhere_ _(the first five_ _paragraphs below) indicate the general distinction he proposes between an_ _individual's subjective view of things or subjective standpoint as against an objective_ _or external view of things that is nobody's in particular._.
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  47. Thomas Nagel (1988). Autonomy and Deontology. In Samuel Scheffler (ed.), Consequentialism and its Critics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  48. Thomas Nagel (1988). The Foundations of Impartiality. In Douglas Seanor, N. Fotion & R. M. Hare (eds.), Hare and Critics: Essays on Moral Thinking. Oxford University Press. 101--112.
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  49. Thomas Nagel (1987). Moral Conflict and Political Legitimacy. Philosophy and Public Affairs 16 (3):215-240.
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  50. Thomas Nagel (1987). What Does It All Mean?: A Very Short Introduction to Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Should the hard questions of philosophy matter to ordinary people? In this down-to-earth, nonhistorical guide, Thomas Nagel, the distinguished author of Mortal Questions and The View From Nowhere, brings philosophical problems to life, revealing in vivid, accessible prose why they have continued to fascinate and baffle thinkers across the centuries. Arguing that the best way to learn about philosophy is to tackle its problems head-on, Nagel turns to some of the most important questions we can ask about ourselves. Do we (...)
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