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  1. Thomas Pink (2013). The Right to Religious Liberty. In John Keown & Robert P. George (eds.), Reason, Morality, and Law: The Philosophy of John Finnis. Oxford University Press. 427.
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  2. Thomas Pink (2012). Reason and Obligation in Suárez. In Benjamin Hill & Henrik Lagerlund (eds.), The Philosophy of Francisco Suárez. Oup Oxford.
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  3. Thomas Pink (2011). Thomas Hobbes and the Ethics of Freedom. Inquiry 54 (5):541 - 563.
    Abstract Freedom in the sense of free will is a multiway power to do any one of a number of things, leaving it up to us which one of a range of options by way of action we perform. What are the ethical implications of our possession of such a power? The paper examines the pre-Hobbesian scholastic view of writers such as Peter Lombard and Francisco Suárez: freedom as a multiway power is linked to the right to liberty understood as (...)
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  4. Thomas Pink (2009). Power and Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Explorations 12 (2):127 – 149.
    Our moral responsibility for our actions seems to depend on our possession of a power to determine for ourselves what actions we perform - a power of self-determination. What kind of power is this? The paper discusses what power in general might involve, what differing kinds of power there might be, and the nature of self-determination in particular. A central question is whether this power on which our moral responsibility depends is by its nature a two-way power, involving a power (...)
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  5. Thomas Pink (2009). Promising and Obligation. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):389-420.
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  6. Thomas Pink (2009). Reason, Voluntariness, and Moral Responsibility. In Lucy O'Brien & Matthew Soteriou (eds.), Mental Actions. Oxford University Press. 95.
  7. Thomas Pink (2007). Intentions and Two Models of Human Action. In Bruno Verbeek (ed.), Reasons and Intentions. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..
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  8. Thomas Pink (2007). Normativity and Reason. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (3):406-431.
    Moral obligation is a demand of reason—a demanding kind of rational justification. How to understand this rational demand? Much recent philosophy, as in the work of Scanlon, takes obligatoriness to be a reason-giving feature of an action. But the paper argues that moral obligatoriness should instead be understood as a mode of justificatory support—as a distinctive justificatory force of demand. The paper argues that this second model of obligation, the Force model, was central to the natural law tradition in ethics, (...)
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  9. Thomas Pink (2004). Free Will: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    Every day we seem to make and act upon all kinds of free choices: some trivial, others so consequential that they change the course of one's life, or even the course of history. But are these choices really free, or are we compelled to act the way we do by factors beyond our control? Is the feeling that we could have made different decisions just an illusion? And if our choices are not free, is it legitimate to hold people morally (...)
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  10. Thomas Pink (2004). Review: Finite and Infinite Goods: A Framework for Ethics. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (449):142-147.
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  11. Thomas Pink (2003). Review: The Possibility of Practical Reason. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (448):812-816.
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  12. Thomas Pink (2003). The Possibility of Practical Reason. Mind 112 (448):812-816.
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  13. Thomas Pink & M. W. F. Stone (eds.) (2003). The Will and Human Action: From Antiquity to the Present Day. Routledge.
    What is the will? And what is its relation to human action? Throughout history, philosophers have been fascinated by the idea of "the will": the source of the drive that motivates human beings to act. However, there has never been a clear consensus as to what the will is and how it relates to human action. Some philosophers have taken the will to be based firmly in reason and rational choice, and some have seen it as purely self-determined. Others have (...)
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  14. Thomas Pink (2000). Hilary Bok Freedom and Responsibility. (Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 1998). 220pp. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 36 (1):107-121.
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  15. Thomas Pink (1998). Dewey J. Hoitenga, John Calvin and the Will. (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House Co., 1997.) Pp. 162, Pbk. Religious Studies 34 (4):497-507.
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  16. Thomas Pink (1998). Reply to Goetz. Mind 107 (425):215-218.
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  17. Thomas Pink (1997). Reason and Agency. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (3):263–280.
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  18. Thomas Pink (1996). The Psychology of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a new theory of the will - of our capacity for decision making. The book argues that taking a decision to act is something we do, and do freely - as much an action as the actions which our decisions explain - and that our freedom of action depends on this capacity for free decision-making. But decision-making is no ordinary action. Decisions to act also have a special executive function, that of ensuring the rationality of the further (...)
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