Search results for 'Thomas S. Dickinson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Aquinas Saint Thomas (1946). The Commentary of St. Thomas Auqinas on Aristotle's Treatise on the Soul. [St. Paul.
    Aquinas Saint Thomas. The Commentary of St. Thomas Aquinas on Aristotle's Treatise on the soul Aquinas Saint Thomas TI-IE COMMENTARY . OF * ST. THOMAS AQUINAS ON I. Front Cover.
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  2. S. S. Academie Romaine De S. Thomas (1923). Annonce de fêtes solennels à l'occasion de l'anniversaire de la canonisation de S. Thomas. Revue Thomiste 28 (23/24):237.
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  3.  5
    Joyce Carol Oates (1987). Soul at the White Heat: The Romance of Emily Dickinson's Poetry. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806-824.
    Emily Dickinson is the most paradoxical of poets: the very poet of paradox. By way of voluminous biographical material, not to mention the extraordinary intimacy of her poetry, it would seem that we know everything about her; yet the common experience of reading her work, particularly if the poems are read sequentially, is that we come away seeming to know nothing. We could recognize her inimitable voice anywhere—in the “prose” of her letters no less than in her poetry—yet it (...)
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  4.  1
    Sharon Cameron (1978). Naming as History: Dickinson's Poems of Definition. Critical Inquiry 5 (2):223-251.
    For Emily Dickinson, perhaps no more so than for the rest of us, there was a powerful discrepancy between what was "inner than the Bone"1 and what could be acknowledged. To the extent that her poems are a response to that discrepancy—are, on one hand, a defiant attempt to deny that the discrepancy poses a problem and, on the other, an admission of defeat at the problem's enormity—they have much to teach us about the way in which language articulates (...)
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  5.  84
    Nicola Mößner (2011). Thought Styles and Paradigms—a Comparative Study of Ludwik Fleck and Thomas S. Kuhn. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (2):362–371.
    At first glance there seem to be many similarities between Thomas S. Kuhn’s and Ludwik Fleck’s accounts of the development of scientific knowledge. Notably, both pay attention to the role played by the scientific community in the development of scientific knowledge. But putting first impressions aside, one can criticise some philosophers for being too hasty in their attempt to find supposed similarities in the works of the two men. Having acknowledged that Fleck anticipated some of Kuhn’s later theses, there (...)
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  6. Paul Hoyningen-Huene & Thomas S. Kuhn (1989). Die Wissenschaftsphilosophie Thomas S. Kuhns Rekonstruktion Und Grundlagenprobleme. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  7. Alfred Schramm (1975). Theorienwandel Oder Theorienfortschritt? Zur Diskussion Um Thomas S. Kuhns "Die Struktur Wissenschaftlicher Revolutionen". Vwgö Verb. D. Wissenschaftl. Gesellschaften Österreichs.
     
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  8. Thomas J. Farrell (2003). Mary Flowers Braswell, Chaucer's “Legal Fiction”: Reading the Records. Madison and Teaneck, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, 2001. Pp. 170. $34.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (4):1256-1258.
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  9. Gary Gutting (1980). Paradigms and Revolutions Appraisals and Applications of Thomas Kuhn's Philosophy of Science.
     
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  10. Gary Gutting (1980). Paradigms and Revolutions Appraisals and Applications of Thomas Kuhn's Philosophy of Science /Edited by Gary Gutting. --. --. University of Notre Dame Press, C1980.
     
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  11. Michael M. Waddell (2004). Natural Theology in St. Thomas's Early Doctrine of Truth. Sapientia 59 (215):5-21.
    The role of natural theology in St. Thomas Aquinas's early doctrine of (transcendental) trut, especially in question one of Aquinas's "Disputed Questions on Truth (De veritate).
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  12. Michael M. Waddell (2003). Truth or Transcendentals: What Was St. Thomas's Intention at de Veritate 1.1? The Thomist 67 (2):197-219.
    In this article, I argue that Thomas Aquinas's primary intention in De Veritate 1.1 was to define truth rather than to offer a systematic doctrine of the transcendentals, and consider the implications of this reading for various aspects of Aquinas's philosophy and theology.
     
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  13. Paul Hoyningen-Huene (1993). Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science. University of Chicago Press.
    Few philosophers of science have influenced as many readers as Thomas S. Kuhn. Yet no comprehensive study of his ideas has existed--until now. In this volume, Paul Hoyningen-Huene examines Kuhn's work over four decades, from the days before The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to the present, and puts Kuhn's philosophical development in a historical framework. Scholars from disciplines as diverse as political science and art history have offered widely differing interpretations of Kuhn's ideas, appropriating his notions of paradigm shifts (...)
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  14.  10
    James A. Marcum, Kuhn, Thomas S. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Thomas S. Kuhn Thomas Samuel Kuhn, although trained as a physicist at Harvard University, became an historian and philosopher of science through the support of Harvard’s president, James Conant. In 1962, Kuhn’s renowned The Structure of Scientific Revolutions helped to inaugurate a revolution—the 1960s historiographic revolution—by providing a new image of science. For … Continue reading Kuhn, Thomas S. →.
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  15.  7
    James A. Marcum, Kuhn, Thomas S. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Thomas S. Kuhn Thomas Samuel Kuhn, although trained as a physicist at Harvard University, became an historian and philosopher of science through the support of Harvard’s president, James Conant. In 1962, Kuhn’s renowned The Structure of Scientific Revolutions helped to inaugurate a revolution—the 1960s historiographic revolution—by providing a new image of science. For … Continue reading Kuhn, Thomas S. →.
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  16.  22
    Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen, Meaning Change in the Context of Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy.
    Thomas S. Kuhn claimed that the meanings of scientific terms change in theory changes or in scientific revolutions. In philosophy, meaning change has been taken as the source of a group of problems, such as untranslatability, incommensurability, and referential variance. For this reason, the majority of analytic philosophers have sought to deny that there can be meaning change by focusing on developing a theory of reference that would guarantee referential stability. A number of philosophers have also claimed that Kuhn’s (...)
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  17.  22
    Gerard Casey (1987). A Problem of Unity in St. Thomas’s Account of Human Action. New Scholasticism 61 (2):146-161.
    In his many and varied writings, St Thomas presents us with both a sophisticated account of human action and a complicated moral theory. In this article, I shall be considering the question of whether St Thomas’s theory of action and his moral theory are mutually consistent. My claim shall be that St Thomas can preserve the ontological unity of human action—but only at the cost of rendering it extremely difficult to evaluate in a manner consistent with his (...)
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  18.  10
    Stephen Pimentel (2004). Thomas's Elusive Proof. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 78:93-105.
    This paper presents a reconstruction of the “existential argument” for the existence of God that seems implicit, if somewhat elusive, in the writings of Thomas Aquinas. The reconstructed argument corresponds to no single passage of Thomas’s but gathers and synthesizes arguments used by him throughout his writings. The paper then attempts to evaluate the argument’s soundness against the background of Thomas’s metaphysical principles. There is ample motivationfor desiring such an evaluation. John Haldane has recently described the existential (...)
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  19.  4
    Jules Janssens (2014). A Survey of Thomas’s Explicit Quotations of Avicenna in the Summa Contra Gentiles. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (2):289-308.
    Thomas Aquinas, in his Summa contra Gentiles, cites by name and quotes Avicenna seventeen times explicitly. A detailed examination of all these passages reveals that Thomas sometimes, although rarely—in fact, only with regard to the discussion of the divine attributes of truth and liberality—makes a positive assessment of Avicenna’s ideas. Much more often, Thomas is highly critical of the latter’s doctrines. It comes as no surprise that Thomas strongly opposes Avicenna’s theories of emanation and of knowledge (...)
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  20. Gerard Casey, An Explication of the de Hebdomadibus of Boethius in the Light of St Thomas's Commentary.
    The writings of Ancius Manlius Severinus Boethius exercised a powerful influence on the nature and development of mediaeval philosophy. The extent of his influence was such that I think it fair to say that anyone seeking more than a superficial grasp of mediaeval philosophy must acquire some first-hand knowledge of his work. The trouble is, however, that while The Consolation of Philosophy is well-known and much commented upon, Boethius’s other works are relatively neglected.1 Included in this latter group are the (...)
     
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  21. Richard J. Mcgowan (1985). The Imperfection of Woman in Thomas's Doctrine of Woman. Dissertation, Marquette University
    St. Thomas's doctrine of woman holds that woman is the imperfectus sexus and that woman is morally infirmior than man. Thomas maintains that a gradus inter virum et mulierem exists with regard to their being an imago Dei. Thus, Thomas's doctrine of woman differs from St. Augustine's doctrine of woman. ;Augustine holds that woman and man are equally an imago Dei. Augustine thinks woman is inferior to man but he confines the alleged inferiority to considerations of the (...)
     
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  22. D. Z. Phillips (1986). R.S. Thomas Poet of the Hidden God : Meaning and Mediation in the Poetry of R.S. Thomas. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  23. Rebecca Copenhaver (2006). Thomas Reid's Philosophy of Mind: Consciousness and Intentionality. Philosophy Compass 1 (3):279-289.
    Thomas Reid’s epistemological ambitions are decisively at the center of his work. However, if we take such ambitions to be the whole story, we are apt to overlook the theory of mind that Reid develops and deploys against the theory of ideas. Reid’s philosophy of mind is sophisticated and strikingly contemporary, and has, until recently, been lost in the shadow of his other philosophical accomplishments. Here I survey some aspects of Reid’s theory of mind that I find most interesting. (...)
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  24.  5
    S. J. Thomas Murphy (1966). St Thomas's Intention in the de Unione. Heythrop Journal 7 (3):301–309.
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  25. Marek Piechowiak (2013). Tomasza z Akwinu koncepcja prawa naturalnego. Czy Akwinata jest myślicielem liberalnym? [Thomas Aquinas’s Conception of Natural Law: Is Aquinas a Liberal Thinker?]. Przegląd Tomistyczny 19:301-337.
    This article seeks to justify the claim that Thomas Aquinas proposed a concept of natural law which is immune to the argument against the recognition of an objective grounding of the good formulated by a well-known representative of the liberal tradition, Isaiah Berlin, in his famous essay “Two Concepts of Freedom.” I argue that Aquinas’s concept of freedom takes into account the very same values and goals that Berlin set out to defend when he composed his critique of natural (...)
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  26. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
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  27. Douglas R. Anderson (2004). Philosophy as Teaching: James's "Knight Errant," Thomas Davidson. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):239-247.
    In 1905 William James wrote an essay in McClure's Magazine recalling the importance to his own work of the Scottish-born philosopher Thomas Davidson. In the essay, James states that Davidson was "essentially a teacher." What is interesting when one looks at Davidson's life and work is that, for Davidson, teaching does seem to be an essential feature of what it means to be a philosopher. Here, I develop how Davidson construes this linking of philosophy and teaching with a concluding (...)
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  28.  3
    Leo Catana (2013). Thomas Taylor's Dissent From Some 18th-Century Views on Platonic Philosophy: The Ethical and Theological Context. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 7 (2):180-220.
    Thomas Taylor’s interpretation of Plato’s works in 1804 was condemned as guilty by association immediately after its publication. Taylor’s 1804 and 1809 reviewer thus made a hasty generalisation in which the qualities of Neoplatonism, assumed to be negative, were transferred to Taylor’s own interpretation, which made use of Neoplatonist thinkers. For this reason, Taylor has typically been marginalised as an interpreter of Plato. This article does not deny the association between Taylor and Neoplatonism. Instead, it examines the historical and (...)
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  29.  28
    Mary Evelyn Sunderland (2010). Regeneration: Thomas Hunt Morgan's Window Into Development. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):325 - 361.
    Early in his career Thomas Hunt Morgan was interested in embryology and dedicated his research to studying organisms that could regenerate. Widely regarded as a regeneration expert, Morgan was invited to deliver a series of lectures on the topic that he developed into a book, Regeneration (1901). In addition to presenting experimental work that he had conducted and supervised, Morgan also synthesized and critiqued a great deal of work by his peers and predecessors. This essay probes into the history (...)
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  30. Sonja Rinofner-Kreidl (2005). The Limits of Representationalism: A Phenomenological Critique of Thomas Metzinger's Self-Model Theory. Synthesis Philosophica 2 (40):355-371.
    Thomas Metzinger’s self-model theory offers a frame¬work for naturalizing subjective experiences, e.g. first-person perspective. These phenomena are explained by referring to representational contents which are said to be interrelated at diverse levels of consciousness and correlated with brain activities. The paper begins with a consideration on naturalism and anti-naturalism in order to roughly sketch the background of Metzinger’s claim that his theory renders philosophical speculations on the mind unnecessary . In particular, Husserl’s phenomenological conception of consciousness is refuted as (...)
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  31.  6
    Sheryl Overmyer (2013). Saint Thomas Aquinas's Pagan Virtues? Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):669-687.
    Today's conversations in virtue ethics are enflamed with questions of “pagan virtues,” which often designate non-Christian virtue from a Christian perspective. “Pagan virtues,” “pagan vices,” and their historied interpretations are the subject of Jennifer Herdt's book Putting On Virtue: The Legacy of the Splendid Vices (2008). I argue that the questions and language animating Herdt's book are problematic. I offer an alternative strategy to Herdt's for reading Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologiae. My results are twofold: (1) a different set of (...)
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  32.  42
    J. Sonderholm (2010). A Reform Proposal in Need of Reform: A Critique of Thomas Pogge's Proposal for How to Incentivize Research and Development of Essential Drugs. Public Health Ethics 3 (2):167-177.
    In two recent essays, Thomas Pogge addresses the question of how research and development of essential drugs should be incentivized. Essential drugs are drugs for diseases that ruin human lives. The current incentivizing scheme for such drugs is, according to Pogge, a significant causal factor in bringing about a state of affairs in which millions of people die or suffer from lack of access to essential drugs. Pogge, therefore, suggests a reform plan for how to incentivize research and development (...)
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  33.  35
    Catherine Kemp (2007). Thomas Reid's Theory of Perception. Hume Studies 33 (2):339-344.
    Review of Ryan Nichols, _Thomas Reid's Theory of Perception_ (Oxford University Press, 2007).
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  34.  17
    Kevin Killeen (2007). "The Doctor Quarrels with Some Pictures": Exegesis and Animals in Thomas Browne's Pseudodoxia Epidemica. Early Science and Medicine 12 (1):1-27.
    This essay explores Thomas Browne's Pseudodoxia epidemica , with its lengthy book on 'errors' in animal lore. In the limited critical literature on Browne's natural history, this author is generally seen as stumbling towards a zoological idiom and clearing away the emblematic 'clutter' of earlier writers on natural history—Gesner, Aldrovandi, Topsell or Franzius. This essay proposes that Browne is working with a more complex set of co-ordinates in his thought, beyond his experimental inclinations and his Aristotelian assumptions. It will (...)
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  35.  9
    Megan Jane Laverty (2014). As Luck Would Have It: Thomas Hardy’s Bildungsroman on Leading a Human Life. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (6):635-646.
    In this essay, I demonstrate the value of the Bildungsroman for philosophy of education on the grounds that these narratives raise and explore educational questions. I focus on a short story in the Bildungsroman tradition, Thomas Hardy’s “A Mere Interlude”. This story describes the maturation of its heroine by narrating a series of events that transform her understanding of what it means to lead a human life. I connect her conceptual shift with two paradigms for leading a human life. (...)
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  36.  17
    Noel Malcolm (2011). The Title of Hobbes's Refutation of Thomas White's De Mundo. Hobbes Studies 24 (2):179-188.
    Hobbes's manuscript refutation of Thomas White bears no title. Some modern scholars have proposed, on the basis of references to it by Mersenne, that the work was entitled 'De motu, loco et tempore', and the abbreviated version of this, 'De motu', has become current in modern scholarship. This research note analyses Mersenne's references, and concludes that this apparent title was a descriptive phrase introduced by Mersenne himself. The full description included the term 'philosophia' ; this suggests a double focus, (...)
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  37.  7
    Marek Porwolik (2013). Józef Maria Bocheński's Logical Analyses of Question I of St. Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologiae. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):75-99.
    Bocheński claims that it would be very useful to apply logical tools to philosophical and theological investigations. His viewpoint can be ascribed to the fact that during Bocheński’s youth logic and reflections on the foundations of mathematics flourished. His seminal work on these issues is the book Gottes Dasein und Wesen. Logische Studien zur Summa Theologiae I, qq. 2–11 (2003). Due to the fact that it was necessary to introduce numerous corrections to it, the book was published over a decade (...)
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  38. Jon Robson (2012). Do Possible Worlds Compromise God's Beauty? A Reply to Mark Ian Thomas Robson. Religious Studies 48 (4):515 - 532.
    In a recent article Mark Ian Thomas Robson argues that there is a clear contradiction between the view that possible worlds are a part of God's nature and the theologically pivotal, but philosophically neglected, claim that God is perfectly beautiful. In this article I show that Robson's argument depends on several key assumptions that he fails to justify and as such that there is reason to doubt the soundness of his argument. I also demonstrate that if Robson's argument were (...)
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  39. Luigi Caranti (2010). The Causes of World Poverty: Reflections on Thomas Pogge's Analysis. Theoria 57 (125):36-53.
    While global poverty is the key moral problem of our times, social scientists are far from reaching a consensus on the causes of this disaster and philosophers disagree on the related responsibilities. One important contribution toward an enlarged understanding is offered by Thomas Pogge in World Poverty and Human Rights . The present paper discusses critically Pogge's contribution and attempts to distinguish the valuable intuitions from the unwarranted conclusions that could be derived from them and that Pogge himself suggests (...)
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  40. Rebecca Copenhaver (2000). Thomas Reid's Direct Realism. Reid Studies 4 (1):17-34.
    Thomas Reid thought of himself as a critic of the representative theory of perception, of what he called the ‘theory of ideas’ or ‘the ideal theory’.2 He had no kind words for that theory: “The theory of ideas, like the Trojan horse, had a specious appearance both of innocence and beauty; but if those philosophers had known that it carried in its belly death and destruction to all science and common sense, they would not have broken down their walls (...)
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  41. Etienne Gilson (1956). The Christian Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas. With a Catalog of St. Thomas's Works. Random House.
     
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  42.  24
    Brian Berkey (2015). Double Counting, Moral Rigorism, and Cohen’s Critique of Rawls: A Response to Alan Thomas. Mind 124 (495):849-874.
    In a recent article in this journal, Alan Thomas presents a novel defence of what I call ‘Rawlsian Institutionalism about Justice’ against G. A. Cohen’s well-known critique. In this response I aim to defend Cohen’s rejection of Institutionalism against Thomas’s arguments. In part this defence requires clarifying precisely what is at issue between Institutionalists and their opponents. My primary focus, however, is on Thomas’s critical discussion of Cohen’s endorsement of an ethical prerogative, as well as his appeal (...)
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  43.  3
    S. Abu Turab Rizvi (2007). Introduction: Thomas Schelling's Distinctive Approach. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (4):403-408.
    (2007). Introduction: Thomas Schelling's distinctive approach. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 14, No. 4, pp. 403-408. doi: 10.1080/13501780701718607.
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  44.  2
    Laura S. Reagan (2012). Mimesis in Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan (1651). History of the Human Sciences 25 (4):25-42.
    How can citizens construct the political authority under which they will live? I argue that Thomas Hobbes’s Leviathan (1651) answers this question concerning the constitutive power of political and normative agency by employing four dimensions of mimesis from the Greek and Roman traditions. And I argue that mimesis accounts for the know-how, or power/knowledge, the general ‘man’ draws upon in constructing the commonwealth. Hobbes revalues poetic mimesis through his stylistic decisions, including the invitation to the reader to read ‘himself’ (...)
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  45.  47
    Alex Levine (2010). Thomas Kuhn's Cottage. Perspectives on Science 18 (3):369-377.
    Books reviewed in this essay:Fred d'Agostino, Naturalizing Epistemology: Thomas Kuhn and the Essential Tension (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010)Edwin H.-C. Hung, Beyond Kuhn: Scientific Explanation, Theory Structure, Incommensurability and Physical Necessity (Hants: Ashgate, 2006)Hanne Andersen, Peter Barker, and Xiang Chen, The Cognitive Structure of Scientific Revolutions (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006)Forty-eight years after the publication of The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, fourteen since the death of its author, Thomas S. Kuhn, and ten since the publication of the posthumous Road (...)
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  46. Tommy J. Curry (2012). The Fortune of Wells: Ida B. Wells-Barnett's Use of T. Thomas Fortune's Philosophy of Social Agitation as a Prolegomenon to Militant Civil Rights Activism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (4):456-482.
    Jesus Christ may be regarded as the chief spirit of agitation and innovation. He himself declared, “I come not to bring peace, but a sword.” One cannot delve seriously into the centuries of activism and scholarship against racism, Jim Crowism, and the terrorism of lynching without encountering the legacies of Timothy Thomas Fortune and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Black scholars from the 19th century to the present have been inspired by the sociological and economic works of Fortune and Wells. Scholars (...)
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  47.  30
    Victor Salas (2009). The Twofold Character of Thomas Aquinas's Analogy of Being. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (3):295-315.
    In this paper I argue that Aquinas’s doctrine of analogy must be understood against the background of his overall philosophy of being. I suggest that Thomas’s oscillation between an analogy of attribution and proper proportionality should be understood as an attempt to address analogy from two different, albeit complementary, metaphysical perspectives. If created being is, as Thomas maintains, a composition of essence and existential act, then it would seem that the analogy of being would bear out the implications (...)
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  48.  43
    Mark Cresswell (2008). Szasz and His Interlocutors: Reconsidering Thomas Szasz's "Myth of Mental Illness" Thesis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (1):23–44.
    It is a matter of some irony that psychiatry's most trenchant critic for over four decades is himself a psychiatrist. I refer to Thomas S. Szasz. Szasz's core thesis may be succinctly rendered: mental illness is a “myth”, a “metaphor” which serves only to obscure the social and ethical “problems in living” we face as human beings. This paper reconsiders the conceptual bases of Szasz's assault on psychiatry and assesses recent counter-arguments of his critical interlocutors. It presents a defence (...)
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  49.  26
    Christopher Kaczor (2004). Thomas Aquinas's Commentary on the Ethics. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):353-378.
    In recent years, some controversy has arisen about whether Thomas Aquinas’s commentaries on Aristotle can be read as expressing Aquinas’s own views rather than as simply an interpretation of Aristotle. This article examines the reasons given in favor of the view that the commentaries, in particular the commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics, are merely interpretations of Aristotle. Using Thomas’sscripture commentaries, internal evidence, as well as the history of reception, it is concluded that the Sententia libri ethicorum presents (...)’s own views and not merely his understanding of Aristotle. (shrink)
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  50. Sharon Kaye & Robert Prisco (2005). In the End It's the Tail: Thomas Aquinas's Fifth Proof of the Existence of God. Think 11 (11):67 - 74.
    This work criticises Thomas Aquinas’s "Fifth Way," also known as the teleological proof of the existence of God. The author argues that if God existed, one would expect human beings to be well-designed. But it is evident by comparing ourselves to cartoon characters that we are not well-designed. Therefore, God does not exist.
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