Search results for 'Thomas S. Dickinson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Thomas S. Dickinson (ed.) (2001). Reinventing the Middle School. Routledgefalmer.
    Many contemporary American middle schools are stuck in a state of "arrested development," failing to implement the original concept of middle schools to varying, though equally corruptive degrees. The individual chapters of the book outline in detail how to counter this dangerous trend, offering guidance to those who seek immediate, significant, internal reforms before we lose the unique value of middle schools for our nation's adolescents.
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  2. Thomas S. Dickinson & Deborah A. Butler (2001). On a Good Day Everyone Grows: Reflections on the Reinvention of a School. In Reinventing the Middle School. Routledgefalmer 321--328.
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  3. G. Lowes Dickinson (2015). The Collected Works of G. Lowes Dickinson. Routledge.
    _The Collected Works of G. Lowes Dickinson_ reissues nine titles from Dickinson's impressive oeuvre. The titles in question cover a range of topics, from Plato and the Greek view of life to civilisation and the causes of war.
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  4.  16
    T. Dickinson (2011). Repeating, Not Simply Recollecting, Repetition : On Kierkegaard's Ethical Exercises. Sophia 50 (4):657-675.
    This essay argues for a formative, and not simply abstract, aspect to the philosophy of religion by attending to the practices of writing employed in Søren Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous work Repetition . By locating this text within an ethical tradition that focuses upon the practices that form subjects, rather than simply the formulation of a theory, its seemingly literary performances can be viewed as exercises. In particular, this text deploys and transforms the Stoic practices of self writing, in the form of (...)
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  5. Colby Dickinson & Adam Kotsko (2015). Agamben's Coming Philosophy: Finding a New Use for Theology. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    In this book, Dickson and Kotso examine Agamben’s more recent theologically-focused writing and its implications for philosophical thought.
     
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  6.  89
    Sarah H. Norgate, Nigel Davies, Chris Speed, Tom Cherrett & Janet Dickinson (2014). The Missing Dimension: The Relevance of People's Conception of Time. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):93-94.
  7.  3
    Colby Dickinson (2015). Slavoj Žižek on Jacques Derrida, or On Derrida’s Search for a Middle Ground Between Marx and Benjamin, and His Finding Žižek Instead. Philosophy Today 59 (2):291-304.
  8.  2
    Colby Dickinson (2015). Seeing the World and Knowing God: Hebrew Wisdom and Christian Doctrine in a Late‐Modern Context. By Paul S. Fiddes. Pp. Vii, 423, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2013, $34.85. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 56 (3):532-534.
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  9.  1
    Colby Dickinson (2014). Levinas's Philosophy of Time: Gift, Responsibility, Diachrony, Hope. By Eric Severson. Pp. Xi, 372, Pittsburgh, PA, Duquesne University Press, 2013. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 55 (4):743-745.
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  10.  3
    H. T. Dickinson (1991). Gregory Claeys, Thomas Paine, Social and Political Thought, London, Unwin Hyman, 1989, Pp. Xiv + 257. Utilitas 3 (01):145-.
  11.  0
    Anthony Dickinson & N. J. Mackintosh (1988). Exorcizing Watson's Ghost. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):452.
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  12. G. Lowes Dickinson (1927). Goethe's View of Nature. Hibbert Journal 26:399.
     
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  13.  0
    Colby Dickinson (2014). The Devil's Whore: Reason and Philosophy in the Lutheran Tradition. Edited by Jennifer Hockenbery Dragseth. Pp. Xvii, 247, Minneapolis, MN, Fortress Press, 2011, £32.24. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 55 (5):970-971.
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  14.  0
    P. N. S. Bawa & J. Dickinson (1982). Force as the Controlling Muscle Variable in Limb Movement. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):543.
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  15.  1
    Sharon Cameron (1978). Naming as History: Dickinson's Poems of Definition. Critical Inquiry 5 (2):223.
    For Emily Dickinson, perhaps no more so than for the rest of us, there was a powerful discrepancy between what was "inner than the Bone"1 and what could be acknowledged. To the extent that her poems are a response to that discrepancy—are, on one hand, a defiant attempt to deny that the discrepancy poses a problem and, on the other, an admission of defeat at the problem's enormity—they have much to teach us about the way in which language articulates (...)
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  16.  0
    Joyce Carol Oates (1987). Soul at the White Heat: The Romance of Emily Dickinson's Poetry. Critical Inquiry 13 (4):806.
    Emily Dickinson is the most paradoxical of poets: the very poet of paradox. By way of voluminous biographical material, not to mention the extraordinary intimacy of her poetry, it would seem that we know everything about her; yet the common experience of reading her work, particularly if the poems are read sequentially, is that we come away seeming to know nothing. We could recognize her inimitable voice anywhere—in the “prose” of her letters no less than in her poetry—yet it (...)
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  17.  8
    N. S. Clayton, James Russell & Anthony Dickinson (2009). Are Animals Stuck in Time or Are They Chronesthetic Creatures? Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):59-71.
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  18.  1
    Nicola S. Clayton, Timothy J. Bussey, Nathan J. Emery & Anthony Dickinson (2003). Prometheus to Proust: The Case for Behavioural Criteria for 'Mental Time Travel'. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (10):436-437.
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  19.  2
    O. T. P. K. Dickinson, Asine & S. Dietz (1982). Results of the Excavations East of the Acropolis 1970-74. Fasc. 2. The Middle Helladic Cemetery, the Middle Helladic and Early Mycenaean Deposits. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:278.
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  20.  2
    N. S. Clayton, J. Russell & A. Dickinson (2009). Are Animals Stuck in Time or Are They Chronesthetic Creatures? Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):59-71.
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  21.  1
    O. T. P. K. Dickinson, Lindos & S. Dietz (1987). Results of the Carlsberg Foundation Excavations in Rhodes 1902-1914. 4, I. Excavations and Surveys in Southern Rhodes: The Mycenaean Period. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 107:247.
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  22.  1
    O. T. P. K. Dickinson, Aegina, H. Walter & S. Hiller (1978). Alt-AginaAlt-Agina. 4, i. Mykenische Keramik. Journal of Hellenic Studies 98:212.
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  23.  1
    O. T. P. K. Dickinson, J. B. Rutter & S. H. Rutter (1979). The Transition to Mycenaean: A Stratified Middle Helladic II to Late Helladic IIa Pottery Sequence From Ayios Stephanos in Lakonia. Journal of Hellenic Studies 99:199.
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  24. J. S. Conway, Creel Hg, F. M. Cross, O. Cullman, W. T. Debary, A. P. D'Entreves, John Dickinson & James Douglass (1979). 370 Carolyn Gratton. Humanitas 59:369.
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  25.  0
    O. T. P. K. Dickinson, Asine & S. Dietz (1984). Results of the Excavations East of the Acropolis 1970-1974. Fasc. 1. General Stratigraphical Analysis and Architectural Remains. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:248.
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  26.  0
    Thomas J. Farrell (2003). Mary Flowers Braswell, Chaucer's “Legal Fiction”: Reading the Records. Madison and Teaneck, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, 2001. Pp. 170. $34.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (4):1256-1258.
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  27.  2
    Glenn Hughes (2014). Love, Terror, and Transcendence in Emily Dickinson's Poetry. Renascence 66 (4):283-304.
    Drawing on a large number of Dickinson’s poems, this essay explores the poetic originality, depth of insight, and extremes of emotional experience in those poems in which she articulates her relationship with a mystery of divinely transcendent being. Although Dickinson definitively rejected the institutional Christianity of her time and place, she employed the religious language and symbols of Christianity to express in a profoundly idiosyncratic way her recurrent experiences of sacred or divine transcendence. In these poems her articulation (...)
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  28.  0
    Jan M. Broekman & William A. Pencak (2010). Signs of Law: The Roberta Kevelson Seminar on Law and Semiotics at Penn State University's Dickinson School of Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 23 (1):1-1.
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  29. Robert Krause (2006). Book Review: Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation From Socrates and Jesus to Thomas Jefferson and Emily Dickinson. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 13 (3):328-329.
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  30. Gerald E. Myers (1976). Dickinson S. Miller, "Philosophical Analysis and Human Welfare; Selected Essays and Chapters From Six Decades", Edited with an Introduction by Loyd D. Easton. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 12 (4):402.
     
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  31.  20
    Colby Dickinson (2011). The Logic of the ''as If'' and the (Non)Existence of God: An Inquiry Into the Nature of Belief in the Work of Jacques Derrida. Derrida Today 4 (1):86-106.
    For Derrida, the ‘‘as if’’, as a regulative principle directly appropriated and modified from its Kantian context, becomes the central lynchpin for understanding, not only Derrida's philosophical system as a whole, but also his numerous seemingly enigmatic references to his ‘‘jewishness’’. Through an analysis of the function of the ‘‘as if’’ within the history of thought, from Greek tragedy to the poetry of Wallace Stevens, I hope to show how Derrida can only appropriate his Judaic roots as an act of (...)
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  32.  0
    Colby Dickinson (2010). Canon as an Act of Creation: Giorgio Agamben and the Extended Logic of the Messianic. Bijdragen 71 (2):132-158.
    The ‘messianic’ is one of philosophy’s most appropriated religious terms, yet one apparently now bereft of its historical religious particularity. This essay thus explores a genealogical approach to the ‘messianic’ which might prove helpful in uncovering the reasons for this transformation from the theological to the philosophical, and what role, if any, theology still has in determining the meaning and usage of this term. Accordingly, this essay traces the term through the work of Walter Benjamin, Jacques Derrida and Giorgio Agamben. (...)
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  33.  2
    Marlene Springer (1971). Emily Dickinson's Humorous Road to Heaven. Renascence 23 (3):129-136.
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  34.  3
    Mario D'Avanzo (1967). Emily Dickinson's "Dying Eye". Renascence 19 (2):110-111.
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  35.  21
    Colby Dickinson (2011). Beyond Violence, Beyond the Text: The Role of Gesture in Walter Benjamin and Giorgio Agamben, and its Affinity with the Work of René Girard. Heythrop Journal 52 (6):952-961.
    Though the work of René Girard has highlighted the interrelations between sacrifice and sacrality in the contemporary world, it has yet to engage the work of Walter Benjamin and his heir, Giorgio Agamben, whose project concerning the Homo Sacer has aroused interest in contemporary political thought. By focusing on Benjamin's early description of mimesis and its relation to language, a position can be elaborated that steers mimesis clear of its indebtedness to language and towards a ‘purer’ realm of gesture. Benjamin's (...)
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  36.  1
    J. K. Packard (1969). The Christ Figure in Dickinson's Poetry. Renascence 22 (1):26-33.
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  37.  6
    Colby Dickinson (2011). Beyond Objects, Beyond Subjects: Giorgio Agamben on Animality, Particularity and the End of Onto-Theology. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 7 (1):87-103.
    The work of Giorgio Agamben could perhaps best be described as an original extension of the onto-theological critique that has dominated much of the last century’s philosophical endeavors. For him, this fundamental critical perspective extends itself toward the deconstruction of traditional significations, including the boundaries said to exist between the human and the animal as well as between the human and the divine. By repeatedly unveiling these arbitrary divisions as being a result of the state of ‘original sin’ in which (...)
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  38.  10
    C. D. Broad (1932). J. McT. E. McTaggart. By G. Lowes Dickinson. With Chapters by Basil Williams and S. V. Keeling. (Cambridge: At the University Press. 1931. Pp. Viii + 160. Price 6s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 7 (27):343-.
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  39.  2
    George E. Dickinson, Paul D. Roof & Karin W. Roof (2010). End-of-Life Issues in United States Veterinary Medicine Schools. Society and Animals 18 (2):152-162.
    The purpose of this research endeavor was to determine the status of dying, death, and bereavement as topics within the curricula of the 28 veterinary medicine schools in the United States. Data were obtained via a mailed questionnaire . Results revealed that over 96% of the schools have offerings related to end-of-life issues, with 80% of students exposed to these offerings. The average number of hours students devote to end-of-life issues is 14.64, about the same as for U.S. medical and (...)
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  40.  1
    G. C. Field (1932). Plato and His Dialogues. By G. Lowes Dickinson. (London: G. Allen & Unwin Ltd. 1931. Pp. 228. Price 6s.)Aristotle”s Psychology of Conduct. By A. K. Griffin, Ph.D. (London: Williams & Norgate Ltd. 1931. Pp. 186. Price 10s. 6d.)The Platonic Epistles. Translated with Introduction and Notes by J. Harwood. (London: Cambridge University Press. 1932. Pp. Xii + 244. Price 15s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 7 (28):491-.
  41.  0
    A. W. Dickinson (1979). A Note on Φοωίκη in Thucydides 2.69.1. Classical Quarterly 29 (01):213-.
    In Thucydides' account of Melesander's expedition with six ships to Caria and Lycia there appears to me to be a difficulty which is universally ignored by commentators and fudged by translators. Thucydides describes the purpose of the expedition.
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  42.  0
    Hilary Dickinson & Michael Erben (1984). 'Moral Positioning' and Occupational Socialization in the Training of Hairdressers, Secretaries and Caterers. Journal of Moral Education 13 (1):49-55.
    Abstract This paper examines the occupational socialization of hairdressers, secretaries andcaterers. It introduces the term moral positioning to analyse aspects of this socialization. Moral positioning refers to a stance which minimizes the economic/instrumental aspects of an occupation, instead emphasizing moral cues and social skills. We argue that the adoption of such a stance is a distortion of the real situation, where economic and instrumental considerations are of great importance. An active development of an awareness of one's social position is precluded. (...)
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  43. G. Lowes Dickinson (1932). Plato and His Dialogues. W. W. Norton.
    First published in 1931, this book explores the nature and importance of Plato’s dialogues. The book was written for an audience of non-scholarly men and women who want to know something about one of the most remarkable thinkers of the Western world. The chapters were originally delivered as broadcast talks.
     
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  44.  0
    G. Lowes Dickinson (1902). The Meaning of Good a Dialogue. R. Brimley Johnson.
    First published in 1937, this book presents itself as a philosophic dialogue, starting with the diversity of men’s ideas about Good. In the first part, it considers the creation and criteria of Good and its relation to truth, pleasure and happiness. In the second part, the book examines some kinds of Good, pointing out their defects and limitations, and suggesting the character of Good which we might hold to be perfect. The topic of the book is treated both philosophically and (...)
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  45. A. Edel (1931). Dickinson's After 2000 Years. Journal of Philosophy 28:500.
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  46.  0
    Rachel Jacoff (1997). Eugene Paul Nassar, Illustrations to Dante's “Inferno.” Rutherford, Madison, and Teaneck, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London and Toronto: Associated University Presses, 1994. Pp. 398; Black-and-White Frontispiece, Many Color and Black-and-White Plates, Errata Sheet. $95. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (2):540-541.
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  47. Patrick J. Keane (2008). Emily Dickinson's Approving God: Divine Design and the Problem of Suffering. University of Missouri.
     
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  48. Edward F. Mooney (2002). The Nature of True Virtue: Theology, Psychology, and Politics in the Writings of Henry James, Sr., Henry James, Jr., and William James. James Duban. Madison: Farleigh Dickinson University Press, 2001. 237 Pp. $43.50 Hard Copy, 0-8386-3888-0. Though Cumbersomely Titled, James Duban's The Nature of True Virtue is a Pithy. [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 16 (4):294.
     
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  49.  0
    Tim Morris (1997). " My Thought is Undressed": Some Theoretical Implications of the Texts of Dickinson's Poems. In Philip G. Cohen (ed.), Texts and Textuality: Textual Instability, Theory, and Interpretation. Garland Pub. 1891--141.
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  50.  0
    Karin W. Roof, Paul D. Roof & George E. Dickinson (2010). End-of-Life Issues in United States Veterinary Medicine Schools. Society and Animals 18 (2):152-162.
    The purpose of this research endeavor was to determine the status of dying, death, and bereavement as topics within the curricula of the 28 veterinary medicine schools in the United States. Data were obtained via a mailed questionnaire . Results revealed that over 96% of the schools have offerings related to end-of-life issues, with 80% of students exposed to these offerings. The average number of hours students devote to end-of-life issues is 14.64, about the same as for U.S. medical and (...)
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