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Profile: Thomas Huddle (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
  1. Thomas S. Huddle (2013). Don't Ban the Sunset in Pharmaceutical Advertising If It Doesn't Darken the Sky. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):27-30.
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  2. Thomas S. Huddle (2013). Moral Fiction or Moral Fact? The Distinction Between Doing and Allowing in Medical Ethics. Bioethics 27 (5):257-262.
    Opponents of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) maintain that physician withdrawal-of-life-sustaining-treatment cannot be morally equated to voluntary active euthanasia. PAS opponents generally distinguish these two kinds of act by positing a possible moral distinction between killing and allowing-to-die, ceteris paribus. While that distinction continues to be widely accepted in the public discourse, it has been more controversial among philosophers. Some ethicist PAS advocates are so certain that the distinction is invalid that they describe PAS opponents who hold to the distinction as in (...)
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  3. Thomas S. Huddle (2013). The Limits of Social Justice as an Aspect of Medical Professionalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):369-387.
    Contemporary accounts of medical ethics and professionalism emphasize the importance of social justice as an ideal for physicians. This ideal is often specified as a commitment to attaining the universal availability of some level of health care, if not of other elements of a “decent minimum” standard of living. I observe that physicians, in general, have not accepted the importance of social justice for professional ethics, and I further argue that social justice does not belong among professional norms. Social justice (...)
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  4. Thomas S. Huddle (2012). Honesty Is an Internal Norm of Medical Practice and the Best Policy. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):15-17.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 3, Page 15-17, March 2012.
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  5. Thomas S. Huddle & F. Amos Bailey (2012). Pacemaker Deactivation: Withdrawal of Support or Active Ending of Life? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):421-433.
    In spite of ethical analyses assimilating the palliative deactivation of pacemakers to commonly accepted withdrawings of life-sustaining therapy, many clinicians remain ethically uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation at the end of life. Various reasons have been posited for this discomfort. Some cardiologists have suggested that reluctance to deactivate pacemakers may stem from a sense that the pacemaker has become part of the patient’s “self.” The authors suggest that Daniel Sulmasy is correct to contend that any such identification of the pacemaker is (...)
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  6. Thomas S. Huddle (2011). Clarifying the Dispute Over Academic–Industry Relationships. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):47 - 49.
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  7. Thomas S. Huddle (2008). Drug Reps and the Academic Medical Center: A Case for Management Rather Than Prohibition. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (2):251-260.
    Academic physicians and bioethicists are increasingly voicing objections to “drug rep” detailing. Leaders in academic medical centers are considering proposals to ban the small gifts of detailing within their walls. Such bans would be a mistake, as the small gifts are unlikely to act as bribes and do not create unacceptable conflicts of interest for physicians. Drug rep detailing does influence physician behavior, but this influence has not been shown to be harmful. Calls for a ban are premised on empirical (...)
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  8. Thomas S. Huddle, Michael A. Schwartz, F. Amos Bailey & Michael A. Bos (2008). Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:5.
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  9. Thomas S. Huddle, Michael A. Schwartz, F. Amos Bailey & Michael A. Bos (2008). Death, Organ Transplantation and Medical Practice. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):5.
    A series of papers in Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine (PEHM) have recently disputed whether non-heart beating organ donors are alive and whether non-heart beating organ donation (NHBD) contravenes the dead donor rule. Several authors who argue that NHBD involves harvesting organs from live patients appeal to.
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  10. Thomas S. Huddle (2007). The Limits of Objective Assessment of Medical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (6):487-496.
    Medical work is increasingly being subjected to objective assessment as those who pay for it seek to grasp the quality of that work and how best to improve it. While objective measures have a role in the assessment of health care, I argue that this role is currently overestimated and that no human practice such as medicine can be fully comprehended by objective assessment. I suggest that the character of practices, in which formalizations are combined with judgment, requires that valid (...)
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