76 found
Order:
Disambiguations:
Thomas Sheehan [61]Thomas J. Sheehan [10]Thomas W. Sheehan [5]
  1. Thomas Sheehan, Heidegger and the Nazis.
    by Victor Farías, translated from Spanish and German into French by Myriam Benarroch and Jean-Baptiste Grasset, preface by Christian Jambet. Editions Verdier, 332 pp., Fr125 (paper).
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2.  5
    Thomas Sheehan (forthcoming). Emmanuel Faye in Advance. Philosophy Today.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  69
    Thomas Sheehan (2001). A Paradigm Shift in Heidegger Research. Continental Philosophy Review 34 (2):183-202.
    The Beiträge zur Philosophie mandates a paradigm shift in Heidegger scholarship. In the face of (1) widespread disarray in the current model, the new paradigm (2) abandons Sein as a name for die Sache selbst, (3) understands Welt/Lichtung/Da as that which gives being, (4) interprets Dasein as apriori openedness rather than as being-there, (5) understands the Kehre as the interface of Geworfenheit and Entwurf, not as a shift in Heidegger's thinking, (6) interprets Ereignis as the opening of the Da rather (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  10
    Thomas Sheehan (2014). What, After All, Was Heidegger About? Continental Philosophy Review 47 (3-4):249-274.
    The premise is that Heidegger remained a phenomenologist from beginning to end and that phenomenology is exclusively about meaning and its source. The essay presents Heidegger’s interpretation of the being of things as their meaningful presence and his tracing of such meaningful presence back to its source in the clearing, which is thrown-open or appropriated ex-sistence. The essay argues five theses: Being is the meaningful presence of things to man. Such meaningful presence is the Befragtes of Heidegger’s question, not the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  21
    Thomas Sheehan (1995). Heidegger's New Aspect: On in-Sein, Zeitlichkeit, and the Genesis of "Being and Time". Research in Phenomenology 25 (1):207-225.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6.  11
    Thomas J. Sheehan (1975). Heidegger, Aristotle and Phenomenology. Philosophy Today 19 (2):87-94.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  3
    Thomas W. Sheehan (1994). Ulysses and Suture. Semiotics:481-487.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  3
    Thomas J. Sheehan (1979). The “original form” of sein und zeit: Heldegger's der bergriff der zeit (1924). Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 10 (2).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Thomas Sheehan (ed.) (1981/2010). Heidegger: The Man and the Thinker. Transaction Publishers.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  3
    Thomas W. Sheehan (1996). Femininity's Fugue. Semiotics:38-42.
  11.  5
    Thomas Sheehan (2014). Heidegger’s Gesamtausgabe and its English Translations. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (3-4):423-447.
    This bibliography presents information on the English translations of Heidegger’s Gesamtausgabe as they are known to me as of September 2014. Sometimes, but not always, earlier or alternate translations are also given.Texts already published between 1910 and 1976GA 1: Frühe Schriften, ed. Friedrich-Wilhelm von Herrmann, 1978; first edition 1972; texts from 1912-16.GA 1: 1–15, “Das Realitätsproblem in der modernen Philosophie ” = “The Problem of Reality in Modern Philosophy,” trans. Philip J. Bossert, revised Aaron Bunch, Becoming Heidegger: On the Trail (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  54
    Thomas Sheehan (2001). Reading Heidegger's “What Is Metaphysics?”. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 1:181-201.
    What follows is an English reading of the first edition of Martin Heidegger's inaugural lecture at Freiburg University,“Was ist Metaphysik?” delivered on Wednesday, July 24, 1929. The German text was first published in December of 1929, some five months after it was delivered, by Friedrich Cohen Verlag in Bonn, to whose heirs gratitude is expressed for the requisite arrangements. The original German publication of 1929 differs in a number of relatively minor ways from later editions -- for example, changes in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  57
    Martin Heidegger & Thomas Sheehan (1979). Essential Readings in Heideger. Research in Phenomenology 9 (1):225-228.
  14. Thomas Sheehan, KEHRE and EREIGNIS: A Prolegomenon to Introduction to Metaphysics.
    Interpretations of Heidegger often fail to distinguish between two very different matters -- on the one hand “the turn” (die Kehre), and on the other hand “the change in Heidegger’s thinking” (die Wendung im Denken), that is, the shift in the way Heidegger formulated and presented his philosophy beginning in the 1930s. Failure to make this distinction can be disastrous for understanding Heidegger, and the danger becomes more acute the closer one gets to texts like Introduction to Metaphysics, where both (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  4
    Thomas W. Sheehan (1995). The Public Sphere in Ulysses. Semiotics:127-134.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  7
    Thomas Sheehan (1995). How (Not) To Read Heidegger. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 69 (2):275-294.
  17. Thomas Sheehan, NIHILISM: Heidegger/Jünger/Aristotle.
    These are two of the questions that inform the extraordinary open letter that Martin Heidegger published in 1955 in a Festschrift celebrating Ernst Jünger's sixtieth birthday.2 Heidegger's letter was in response to an essay that Jünger had contributed six years earlier, in 1949, to a Festschrift on Heidegger's own sixtieth birthday. So there was a certain reciprocity in the exchange: a favor returned, a public gesture of respect mirroring an earlier one.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Martin Heidegger & Thomas Sheehan, Heidegger's Speech at Husserl's Seventieth Birthday Celebration.
    For your students, celebrating this day is a source of rare and pure joy. The only way we can be adequate to this occasion is to let the gratitude that we owe you become the fundamental mood suffusing everything from beginning to end. In keeping with a beautiful tradition, today on this celebratory occasion we offer you as our gift this slender volume of a few short essays. In no way could this ever be an adequate return for all that (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Thomas Sheehan, Hermeneia and Apophansis: The Early Heidegger on Aristotle.
    Aristotle's treatment of logos apophantikos is found within the treatise that bears the title Peri Hermeneias, On Hermeneia. And it was to this treatise -- or, more accurately, to the first four sections of it -- that the early Heidegger turned again and again in his courses during the 1920s in an effort to retrieve from this phenomenon a hidden meaning.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  13
    Martin Heidegger, Thomas Sheehan & Frederick Elliston (1979). The Understanding of Time in Phenomenology and in the Thinking of the Being Question. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):199-201.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  38
    Thomas Sheehan & Corinne Painter (1999). Choosing One's Fate: A Re-Reading of Sein Und Zeit §74. Research in Phenomenology 29 (1):63-82.
    In this article we present (1) a close paraphrase--virtually a translation--of Heidegger's Sein und Zeit, §74, "Die Grundverfassung der Geschichtlichkeit," pp. 382-387, together with an analytical outline found in the Appendix; and (2) a brief commentary on the text. What Heidegger says about his own translation of Aristotle's Physics B 1 applies here as well: "The ‘translation' is already the interpretation proper. Thereafter only an explanation of the ‘translation' is called for.".
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Thomas Sheehan & Charles Guignon, I. The End of a Catholic Philosopher.
    Engelbert Krebs, a Catholic priest and professor of theology at Freiburg University, was a close friend of her husband, the philosophy lecturer Martin Heidegger. In fact, Krebs was the minister who had officiated at the Heideggers' Catholic wedding in Freiburg Cathedral on March..
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  5
    Thomas W. Sheehan (1995). The Public Sphere in Ulysses. Semiotics:127-134.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Thomas Sheehan & Martin Heidegger, Plato'sdoctrineoftruth.
    [203] The knowledge that comes from the sciences is usually expressed in propositions and laid before us as conclusions that we can grasp and put to use. But the "doctrine" of a thinker is that which remains unsaid within what is said, that to which we are exposed so that we might expend ourselves on it.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Thomas Sheehan & Martin Heidegger, Ontheessenceandconceptof.
    Since those times "nature" has become the basic word designating essential relations that Western historical humanity has to beings, both to itself and to beings other than itself. This fact is shown by a rough list of dichotomies that have become prevalent: nature and grace (i.e., super-nature).
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  7
    Thomas J. Sheehan (1977). Getting to the Topic: The New Edition of Wegmarken. Research in Phenomenology 7 (1):299-316.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Thomas Sheehan, Heidegger's Philosophy of Mind.
    The period after World War Two saw the emergence both of the so-called later Heidegger and of the corresponding problem of the unity of his thought. Although his major work, Sein und Zeit, 1927 (=SZ) had announced Heidegger's intention of working out the meaning of being (Sein), his publications up through 1943, with the exception of the brief Vom Wesen der Wahrheit, presented only his preparatory analysis of human openness (Dasein). However, Heidegger's post-war publications seemed to emphasize “being itself” (the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  12
    Thomas Sheehan (1978). Heidegger. International Philosophical Quarterly 18 (4):488-489.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  13
    Thomas J. Sheehan (1978). Philosophical Hermeneutics. International Philosophical Quarterly 18 (3):366-368.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  4
    Thomas W. Sheehan (1996). Femininity's Fugue. Semiotics:38-42.
  31.  4
    Thomas J. Sheehan (1978). "Heidegger: Freiburger Universitätsvortrage Zu Seinem Gedenken," by H.-G. Gadamer, W. Marx, C. F. V. Weizsäcker, Ed. Werner Marx. [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 55 (4):423-424.
  32.  10
    Thomas Sheehan (1985). Metaphysics and Bivalence. Modern Schoolman 63 (1):21-43.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Thomas Sheehan, "Time and Being," 1925-27.
    It is very significant that Heidegger chose Die Grundprobleme der Phänomenologie, the lecture course he gave in the summer semester of 1927, to be the first publication in his monumental Gesamtausgabe.1 The text is rich in many ways, but one of its major claims to fame may rest in a footnote, taken from Heidegger's own manuscript of the course, that appears on page 1 of the published version. This elliptical footnote, which in fact functions like a subtitle for the whole (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  9
    Thomas J. Sheehan (1979). The Piety of Thinking. New Scholasticism 53 (4):540-544.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  13
    Thomas Sheehan (2003). Being, Opened-Ness, and Unlimited Technology: Ten Theses on Heidegger. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 59 (4):1253 - 1259.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Thomas Sheehan, A Normal Nazi.
    In 1987 Victor Farías' Heidegger et le nazisme dropped like a bomb on the quiet chapel where Heidegger's disciples were gathered, and blew the place to bits. The myth Heidegger had concocted after the war -- that he supported the Nazis briefly and only to protect the university -- was shattered by the evidence Farías mustered of Heidegger's deep and long-lasting commitment to National Socialism, his blatant anti-Semitism, his blackballing of colleagues for no more than holding pacifist convictions, associating with (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Thomas Sheehan, Heidegger's New Aspect.
    In 1983 Otto Pöggeler wrote: "Regrettably, even today there is still no reliable overview of Heidegger's early lecture courses based on the extant student transcripts and Heidegger's manuscripts." Ten years later, and the lacuna has been filled with Theodore Kisiel's The Genesis of Heidegger's BEING AND TIME. This brilliant and complex work provides, in its own words, the first "reliable, complete, and relatively uninterrupted story" of how Heidegger got from there to here, where "there" is 1915 and "here" is the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Thomas Sheehan, From Divinity to Infinity.
    Some, of course, would go further and claim that Jesus was the very content of what he preached, the ontological embodiment of his message, or as Origin put it centuries ago, the kingdom-of-God-in-person, ho autobasileia.1 This affirmation in fact lies at the heart of the Christian tradition, and if the guardians of that orthodoxy were to answer the question we are posing today, they would say: What the Christ of faith will be is the same as what the Jesus of (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  16
    Thomas Sheehan (1985). A Way Out of Metaphysics? Research in Phenomenology 15 (1):229-234.
  40. Thomas Sheehan, "Heidegger, Martin (1889-1976),".
    Martin Heidegger taught philosophy at Freiburg University (1915-1923), Marburg University (1923-1928), and again at Freiburg University (1928-1945). Early in his career he came under the influence of Edmund Husserl, but he soon broke away to fashion his own philosophy. His most famous work, Sein und Zeit (Being and Time) was published in 1927. Heidegger's energetic support for Hitler in 1933-34 earned him a suspension from teaching from 1945 to 1950. In retirement he published numerous works, including the first volumes of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  16
    Thomas Sheehan (1986). Two Easter Legends. Philosophy and Theology 1 (1):32-48.
    How did faith in the resurrected Jesus arise? Can we reconstruct, or deconstruct, the original Easter story? What are the implications of the empty tomb, the women’s failure to believe, and the lack of appearances in Mark? These questions are raised and a proposal offered in this chapter from the author’s forthcoming book, The First Coming.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  7
    Thomas Sheehan (1993). Parola E Appartenenza. Review of Metaphysics 47 (2):367-368.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  6
    Thomas J. Sheehan (1976). "Martin Heidegger: In Europe and America," Ed. Edward G. Ballard and Charles E. Scott. Modern Schoolman 53 (3):302-304.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  6
    Thomas J. Sheehan (1977). Chronicles. Man and World 10 (3):362-364.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  8
    Thomas Sheehan (1986). Two Easter Legends. Philosophy and Theology 1 (1):32-48.
    How did faith in the resurrected Jesus arise? Can we reconstruct, or deconstruct, the original Easter story? What are the implications of the empty tomb, the women’s failure to believe, and the lack of appearances in Mark? These questions are raised and a proposal offered in this chapter from the author’s forthcoming book, The First Coming.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  10
    Thomas Sheehan (1992). Book Review:The Heidegger Controversy: A Critical Reader. Richard Wolin; On Heidegger's Nazism and Philosophy. Tom Rockmore. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (1):178-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Thomas Sheehan, Man and World 30 (1997), 227-238.
    Many of us first met this translation some twenty years ago in its then typed format--690 double-space pages replete with hundreds of handwritten corrections. Now two decades later, a glance at that earlier manuscript reveals that little has changed in the intervening years: The published book is virtually identical to the earliest typed manuscript. So too, the Introduction here (JS 1-35) is the same one that appeared in Basic Writings (1977, 41-89), with only minor orthographical changes.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  13
    Thomas Sheehan & Richard Taft (1983). Various Tunings of Thinking. Research in Phenomenology 13 (1):211-219.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Thomas Sheehan (2013). The Turn: All Three of Them. In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury 31.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  13
    D. Sparti & Thomas Sheehan (1984). Sign, World, and Being. Research in Phenomenology 14 (1):277-279.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 76