43 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Thomas Sturm (Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona)
  1. Eric Arnau, Saray Ayala & Thomas Sturm (2014). Cognitive Externalism Meets Bounded Rationality. Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):50-64.
    When proponents of cognitive externalism (CE) turn to empirical studies in cognitive science to put the framework to use and to assess its explanatory success, they typically refer to perception, memory, or motor coordination. In contrast, not much has been said about reasoning. One promising avenue to explore in this respect is the theory of bounded rationality (BR). To clarify the relationship between CE and BR, we criticize Andy Clark's understanding of BR, as well as his claim that BR does (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Eric Arnau, Anna Estany, Rafael González del Solar & Thomas Sturm (2014). The Extended Cognition Thesis: Its Significance for the Philosophy of (Cognitive) Science. Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-18.
    While the extended cognition (EC) thesis has gained more followers in cognitive science and in the philosophy of mind and knowledge, our main goal is to discuss a different area of significance of the EC thesis: its relation to philosophy of science. In this introduction, we outline two major areas: (I) The role of the thesis for issues in the philosophy of cognitive science, such as: How do notions of EC figure in theories or research programs in cognitive science? Which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thomas Sturm (2014). 'Kant Our Contemporary'? Kitcher on the Fruitfulness of Kant's Theory of the Cognitive Subject. Kantian Review 19 (1):135-141.
    In chapter 15 of Kant's Thinker, Patricia Kitcher claims that we can treat Kant as , and that his theory of apperception new. I question this with respect to two of her four chosen topics. First, I address her attempt to show that Kant's theory of apperceptive self-knowledge is immune to sceptical doubts of the sort Barry Stroud presents. Second, I turn to her argument that this theory is superior to current accounts of the special authority of self-knowledge. Over and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Eric Arnau, Anna Estany, Rafael González del Solar & Thomas Sturm (2013). The Extended Cognition Thesis: Its Significance for the Philosophy of (Cognitive) Science. Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-18.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Thomas Sturm (2013). Michael Friedman and the “Marriage” of History and Philosophy of Science (and History of Philosophy). Metascience:1-8.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Gerd Gigerenzer & Thomas Sturm (2012). How (Far) Can Rationality Be Naturalized? Synthese 187 (1):243-268.
    The paper shows why and how an empirical study of fast-and-frugal heuristics can provide norms of good reasoning, and thus how (and how far) rationality can be naturalized. We explain the heuristics that humans often rely on in solving problems, for example, choosing investment strategies or apartments, placing bets in sports, or making library searches. We then show that heuristics can lead to judgments that are as accurate as or even more accurate than strategies that use more information and computation, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Thomas Sturm (2012). Bühler and Popper: Kantian Therapies for the Crisis in Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):462-472.
    I analyze the historical background and philosophical considerations of Karl Bühler and his student Karl Popper regarding the crisis of psychology. They share certain Kantian questions and methods for reflection on the state of the art in psychology. Part 1 outlines Bühler’s diagnosis and therapy for the crisis in psychology as he perceived it, leading to his famous theory of language. I also show how the Kantian features of Bühler’s approach help to deal with objections to his crisis diagnosis and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Thomas Sturm (2012). Consciousness Regained? Philosophical Arguments for and Against Reductive Physicalism. Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience 14 (1):55-63.
    This paper is an overview of recent discussions concerning the mind–body problem that have been taking place at the interface between philosophy and neuroscience. In it I focus on phenomenal consciousness or “qualia”, which I distinguish from various related issues (sections 1-2). I then discuss various influential skeptical arguments that question the possibility of reductive explanations of qualia in physicalist terms: knowledge arguments, conceivability arguments, the argument from multiple realizability and the explanatory gap argument. None of the arguments is found (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Thomas Sturm (2012). The “Rationality Wars” in Psychology: Where They Are and Where They Could Go. Inquiry 55 (1):66-81.
    Current psychology of human reasoning is divided into several different approaches. For instance, there is a major dispute over the question whether human beings are able to apply norms of the formal models of rationality such as rules of logic, or probability and decision theory, correctly. While researchers following the “heuristics and biases” approach argue that we deviate systematically from these norms, and so are perhaps deeply irrational, defenders of the “bounded rationality” approach think not only that the evidence for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Thomas Sturm (2012). What's Philosophical About Kant's Philosophy of the Human Sciences? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):203-207.
  11. Thomas Sturm & Annette Mülberger (2012). Crisis Discussions in Psychology—New Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):425-433.
    In this introductory article, we provide a historical and philosophical framework for studying crisis discussions in psychology. We first trace the various meanings of crisis talk outside and inside of the sciences. We then turn to Kuhn’s concept of crisis, which is mainly an analyst’s category referring to severe clashes between theory and data. His view has also dominated many discussions on the status of psychology: Can it be considered a “mature” science, or are we dealing here with a pre- (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Uljana Feest & Thomas Sturm (2011). What (Good) is Historical Epistemology? Editors' Introduction. Erkenntnis 75 (3):285-302.
    We provide an overview of three ways in which the expression “Historical epistemology” (HE) is often understood: (1) HE as a study of the history of higher-order epistemic concepts such as objectivity, observation, experimentation, or probability; (2) HE as a study of the historical trajectories of the objects of research, such as the electron, DNA, or phlogiston; (3) HE as the long-term study of scientific developments. After laying out various ways in which these agendas touch on current debates within both (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Thomas Sturm (2011). Freedom and the Human Sciences: Hume’s Science of Man Versus Kant’s Pragmatic Anthropology. Kant Yearbook 3 (1):23-42.
    In his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, Kant formulates the idea of the empirical investigation of the human being as a free agent. The notion is puzzling: Does Kant not often claim that, from an empirical point of view, human beings cannot be considered as free? What sense would it make anyway to include the notion of freedom in science? The answer to these questions lies in Kant’s notion of character. While probably all concepts of character are involved (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Thomas Sturm (2011). Historical Epistemology or History of Epistemology? The Case of the Relation Between Perception and Judgment. Erkenntnis 75 (3):303-324.
    This essay aims to sharpen debates on the pros and cons of historical epistemology, which is now understood as a novel approach to the study of knowledge, by comparing it with the history of epistemology as traditionally pursued by philosophers. The many versions of both approaches are not always easily discernable. Yet, a reasoned comparison of certain versions can and should be made. In the first section of this article, I argue that the most interesting difference involves neither the subject (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Thomas Sturm (2011). Historical Epistemology or History of Epistemology? The Case of the Relation Between Perception and Judgment: Dedicated to Günther Patzig on His 85th Birthday. Erkenntnis 75 (3):303 - 324.
    This essay aims to sharpen debates on the pros and cons of historical epistemology, which is now understood as a novel approach to the study of knowledge, by comparing it with the history of epistemology as traditionally pursued by philosophers. The many versions of both approaches are not always easily discernable. Yet, a reasoned comparison of certain versions can and should be made. In the first section of this article, I argue that the most interesting difference involves neither the subject (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Thomas Sturm (2011). Kant Über Die Dreifache Beziehung Zwischen den Wissenschaften Und der Philosophie. Internationales Jahrbuch des Deutschen Idealismus/International Yearbook of German Idealism 8:60-82.
  17. Mitchell G. Ash, Horst Gundlach & Thomas Sturm (2010). Irreducible Mind? On E. Kelly Et Al., Irreducible Mind: Toward a Psychology for the 21st Century. [REVIEW] American Journal of Psychology 123:246-250.
    This is a review of a book that tries to re-establish mind-body dualism by using (a) empirical research on near-death experiences, placebo effects, creativity, claiming even that parapsychology should become a respected part of science, and (b) Frederic W. H. Myers' (1843-1901) metaphor of the brain as a kind of receiving device that records what the irreducible mind sends as messages. Among other things, we criticize the lack of philosophical clarity about mind-body relation, and question the book's tendency to refer (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Thomas Sturm (2010). Christian Gottfried Schütz. In Manfred Kuehn & Heiner F. Klemme (eds.), The Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century German Philosophers. Thoemmes.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Thomas Sturm (2010). Johann Gottlob Krüger. In Manfred Kuehn & Heiner F. Klemme (eds.), The Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century German Philosophers. Thoemmes.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Thomas Sturm (2010). Johann Martin Chladenius. In Manfred Kuehn & Heiner F. Klemme (eds.), The Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century German Philosophers. Thoemmes.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Thomas Sturm & Falk Wunderlich (2010). Kant and the Scientific Study of Consciousness. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):48-71.
    We argue that Kant’s views about consciousness, the mind-body problem, and the status of psychology as a science all differ drastically from the way in which these topics are conjoined in present debates about the prominent idea of a science of consciousness. Kant did never use the concept of consciousness in the now dominant sense of phenomenal qualia; his discussions of the mind-body problem center not on the reducibility of mental properties but of substances; and his views about the possibility (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Thomas Sturm (2009). Kant Und Die Wissenschaften Vom Menschen. Mentis.
    This book explores Kant's philosophy of the human sciences, their status, their relations and prospects. Contrary to widespread belief, he is not dogmatic about the question of whether these disciplines are proper sciences. Instead, this depends on whether we can rationally adjust assumptions about the methods, goals, and subject matter of these disciplines - and this has to be done alongside of ongoing research. Kant applies these ideas especially in lectures on "pragmatic antropology" given from 1772-1796. In doing so, he (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Thomas Sturm (2008). Why Did Kant Reject Physiological Explanations in His Anthropology? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):495-505.
    One of Kant’s central tenets concerning the human sciences is the claim that one need not, and should not, use a physiological vocabulary if one studies human cognitions, feelings, desires, and actions from the point of view of his “pragmatic” anthropology. The claim is well-known, but the arguments Kant advances for it have not been closely discussed. I argue against misguided interpretations of the claim, and I present his actual reasons in favor of it. Contemporary critics of a “physiological anthropology” (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Thomas Sturm (2008). What Is the Foundation of Norms of Rationality? In Ansgar Beckermann, Holm Tetens & Sven Walter (eds.), Philosophie: Grundlagen und Anwendungen/Philosophy: Foundations and Applications. Mentis.
    An overview of debates about the relation between the psychology of human rationality and naturalized epistemology, introducing three papers by Michael Bishop, Gerd Gigerenzer, and Alvin Goldman.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Mitchell G. Ash & Thomas Sturm (eds.) (2007). Psychology’s Territories: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives From Different Disciplines. Erlbaum.
    This is an interdisciplinary collection of new essays by philosophers, psychologists, neuroscientists and historians on the question: What has determined and what should determine the territory or the boundaries of the discipline named "psychology"? Both the contents - in terms of concepts - and the methods - in terms of instruments - are analyzed. Among the contributors are Mitchell Ash, Paul Baltes, Jochen Brandtstädter, Gerd Gigerenzer, Michael Heidelberger, Gerhard Roth, and Thomas Sturm.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Gerd Gigerenzer & Thomas Sturm (2007). Tools=Theories=Data? On Some Circular Dynamics in Cognitive Science. In Mitchell G. Ash & Thomas Sturm (eds.), Psychology’s Territories: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives from Different Disciplines. Erlbaum.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Thomas Sturm (2007). Self-Deception, Rationality, and the Self. Teorema 26 (3):73-95.
    This essay is a plea for the view that philosophers should analyze the concept of self-deception more with the aim of having useful applications for empirical research. This is especially desirable because psychologists often use different, even incompat-ible conceptions of self-deception when investigating the factual conditions and con-sequences, as well as the very existence, of the phenomenon. At the same time, philosophers who exploit psychological research on human cognition and reasoning in order to better understand self-deception fail to realize that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Thomas Sturm (2007). The Self Between Philosophy and Psychology: The Case of Self-Deception. In Mitchell G. Ash & Thomas Sturm (eds.), Psychology’s Territories: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives from Different Disciplines. Erlbaum.
  29. Thomas Sturm & Mitchell G. Ash (eds.) (2007). Psychology's Territories: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives From Different Disciplines. Erlbaum.
    Historical and Contemporary Perspectives From Different Disciplines Mitchell Ash, Thomas Sturm. Psychological Thought and Practice: Historical and Interdisciplinary Perspectives Mitchell G. Ash University of Vienna ...
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Thomas Sturm (2006). Is There a Problem with Mathematical Psychology in the Eighteenth Century? A Fresh Look at Kant’s Old Argument. . Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 42:353-377.
    Common opinion ascribes to Immanuel Kant the view that psychology cannot become a science properly so called, because it cannot be mathematized. It is equally common to claim that this reflects the state of the art of his times; that the quantification of the mind was not achieved during the eighteenth century, while it was so during the nineteenth century; or that Kant's so-called “impossibility claim” was refuted by nineteenth-century developments, which in turn opened one path for psychology to become (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Thomas Sturm (2006). Review: Sacks, Insight and Objectivity. [REVIEW] Kant-Studien 97:239-243.
    I criticize Sacks' ambitious work on objectivity and its history in modern philosophy in three main regards: First, Sacks tends to oversimplify the different views of Descartes, Locke, and Hume, which are not all haunted in the same sense by a "subject-driven skepticism". Second, Kant's conception of objectivity isn't directed (primarily) at refuting external world skepticism. Third, Sacks assumes that it is clear what transcendental idealism is: a doctrine that asserts an ontological distinction between "appearances" and "things in themselves". This (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Thomas Sturm (2006). Wie Können Wir von Kant Lernen? Das Achtzehnte Jahrhundert 30:89-95.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Thomas Sturm & Gerd Gigerenzer (2006). How Can We Use the Distinction Between Discovery and Justification? On the Weaknesses of the Strong Programme in the Sociology of Science. In Jutta Schickore & Friedrich Steinle (eds.), Revisiting Discovery and Justification. Springer. 133--158.
    We attack the SSK's rejection of the distinction between discovery and justification (the DJ distinction), famously introduced by Hans Reichenbach and here defended in a "lean" version. Some critics claim that the DJ distinction cannot be drawn precisely, or that it cannot be drawn prior to the actual analysis of scientific knowledge. Others, instead of trying to blur or to reject the distinction, claim that we need an even more fine-grained distinction (e.g. between discovery, invention, prior assessment, test and justification). (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and original arguments for a deeper (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Thomas Sturm & Mitchell G. Ash (2005). The Roles of Instruments in Psychological Research. History of Psychology 8:3-34.
    What roles have instruments played in psychology and related disciplines? How have instruments affected the dynamics of psychological research, with what possibilities and limits? What is a psychological instrument? This paper provides a conceptual foundation for specific case studies concerning such questions. The discussion begins by challenging widely accepted assumptions about the subject and analyzing the general relations between scientific experimentation and the uses of instruments in psychology. Building on this analysis, a deliberately inclusive definition of what constitutes a psychological (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Editor's Introduction. In Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.), Why does history matter to philosophy and the sciences? De Gruyter.
  37. Thomas Sturm (2004). Manfred Kuehn: Kant - A Biography. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 54:476-479.
    Review of Manfred Kuehn's outstanding biography on Immanuel Kant. A critical point I raise concerns Kuehn's discussion of Kant's relation to Hume. Scholars are divided over the questions of (a) whether Hume was an actual inspiration for Kant’s Critical philosophy, (b) whether Kant’s defense really addresses Hume’s problem of causality, and, of course, (c) whether Kant’s arguments provide a satisfactory solution to the problem. Sometimes these questions are not clearly distinguished by interpreters, part of the reason Kant scholarship appears so (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Thomas Sturm (2001). How Not to Investigate the Human Mind: Kant on the Impossibility of Empirical Psychology. In Eric Watkins (ed.), Kant and the Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    This essay reconsiders Kant's denial of scientific status to the discipline of empirical psychology, which have often been viewed as quite problematic. In the preface to the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, Kant denies that psychology can be natural science proper. I argue that Kant's impossibility claim is (1) based on a very specific conception of science that he did not put forward elsewhere, and that is restricted to *natural* sciences in any case. Also, (2) Kant's critical remarks are directed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Thomas Sturm (2001). Kant on Empirical Psychology: How Not to Investigate the Human Mind. In Eric Watkins (ed.), Kant and the Sciences. Oxford University Press. 163--184.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Thomas Sturm (2001). Margaret S. Archer, Being Human: The Problem of Agency. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 5 (46).
    A review which, among other criticisms of Archer's book, discusses some philosophical problems concerning talk of the "self" in the human sciences.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Thomas Sturm (1999). Der Elektronische Kant: Neue CD-ROMs Zu Kants Schriften. [REVIEW] Kant-Studien 90:107-110.
    A review of electronic versions of writings by Kant's: first, a CD-Rom containing central parts of the Academy edition; second, an edition containing next to central works by Kant also texts by Locke, Berkeley and Hume. Both editions are useful and complement each other, although for scholarly purposes the electronic version of the Academy edition is to be preferred.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Thomas Sturm (1999). Zustand Und Zukunft der Akademie-Ausgabe von Kants Gesammelten Schriften. Kant-Studien 90 (1):100-106.
    The article reports discussions at an international conference of leading Kant scholars held at the University of Marburg (Germany) in 1998. The conference was concerned with both the current state and the need for revisions of the Academy edition of Kant's Gesammelte Schriften as well. As became clear, a complete revision is necessary in the case of Vols. XX-XXIV and XXVII-XXIX, since these can hardly be used for research. Improvements of various extent and content should be attempted in other volumes (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Milton A. Trapold, Sandra R. Belhert & Thomas Sturm (1965). A Failure to Find a Response Persisting in the Apparent Absence of Motivation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (5):538.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation