29 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Thomas Talbott [23]Thomas B. Talbott [5]Thomas P. Talbott [1]
  1. Thomas Talbott, And the Abuse of Revelation.
    A generalization about religious belief to which there are, I believe, few exceptions is this: The more confident one is in one's religious beliefs, the more willing one is to subject those beliefs to careful scrutiny; the less confident one is in them – the more one unconsciously fears that they cannot withstand such scrutiny – the more eager one is to find a device that would appear to protect them from careful scrutiny. And, more often than not, such a (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Thomas Talbott, John Beversluis and the Problem of Evil.
    In an article that I wrote back in 1987,1 I sought to make some ideas then current in the philosophical literature available to a wider audience of non-philosophers. I was also very hard on John Beversluis, author of C.S. Lewis and the Search for Ra- tional Religion (1985), and even implied, perhaps with less charity than I should have manifested, that his treatment of the problem of evil failed to meet even minimal standards of philosophical competence. I fully expected, therefore, (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thomas Talbott, The Love of God and the Heresy of Exclusivism.
    How should we interpret the declaration in I John 4:8 and 16 that God not only loves, but is love? Many philosophically trained Christians will no doubt interpret this, as I do, to mean that love is part of God's very essence; that loving kindness is an essential, not merely an accidental, property of God. Of course the author of I John was not a philosopher and did not, fortunately, employ philosophical jargon in his writings; nor was he likely even (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Thomas Talbott (2013). The Topography of Divine Love. Faith and Philosophy 30 (3):302-316.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Thomas Talbott (2009). God, Freedom, and Human Agency. Faith and Philosophy 26 (4):378-397.
    My purpose in this paper is to set forth a theory of agency that makes no appeal to mysterious notions of agent causation. But lest I be misunderstood at the very outset, I should perhaps clarify the point that my emphasis here is on the term “mysterious” and not on the expression “agent causation.” I shall begin with what seems to me the best possible example of agent causation: the sense in which a supremely perfect God, if one should exist, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Thomas Talbott (2008). Why Christians Should Not Be Determinists. Faith and Philosophy 25 (3):300-316.
    In response to Lynne Rudder Baker’s intriguing paper, “Why Christians Should Not Be Libertarians,” I suggest that, even if a Christian simply lets the chips fall where they may with respect to the dispute between libertarians and compatibilists, a Christian should not be a determinist. I also offer for consideration a rather controversial non-Augustinian explanation for the near universality and seeming inevitability of human sin.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Thomas Talbott (2004). Misery and Freedom: Reply to Walls. Religious Studies 40 (2):217-224.
    In this brief reply to Walls's challenging critique, I try to do two things: first, clarify the most fundamental point on which I think Walls and I disagree, and second, argue that, as surprising as it may first appear, Walls's free-will theodicy of hell requires that God interfere with human freedom in inappropriate ways. (Published Online April 21 2004).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Thomas Talbott (2004). ``Misery and Freedom: Reply to Walls&Quot. Religious Studies 40:217--224.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Thomas Talbott (2002). Charles Seymour, a Theodicy of Hell (Studies in Philosophy and Religion, Vol. 20). International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 52 (1):61-63.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Thomas Talbott (2001). Freedom, Damnation, and the Power to Sin with Impunity. Religious Studies 37 (4):417-434.
    I argue that the idea of a freely embraced eternal destiny in hell is deeply incoherent and implies, quite apart from its incoherence, that we are free both to sin with impunity and to defeat God's justice forever.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Thomas Talbott (2001). Universalism and the Supposed Oddity of Our Earthly Life: Reply to Michael Murray. Faith and Philosophy 18 (1):102-109.
    In “Three Versions of Universalism,” Michael Murray asks what purpose our earthly life might serve if universalism is true; and in this brief response, I suggesta possible answer.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Thomas Talbott (2001). Universalism and the Supposed Oddity of Our Earthly Life. Faith and Philosophy 18 (1):102-109.
    In “Three Versions of Universalism,” Michael Murray asks what purpose our earthly life might serve if universalism is true; and in this brief response, I suggesta possible answer.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Thomas Talbott (1999). Universalism and the Greater Good: Reply to Gordon Knight. Faith and Philosophy 16:102-105.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Thomas Talbott (1999). Universalism and the Greater Good. Faith and Philosophy 16 (1):102-105.
    Gordon Knight recently challenged my assumption, which I made for the purpose of organizing and classifying certain theological disputes, that a specific set of three propositions is logically inconsistent (or necessarily false). In this brief rejoinder, I explain Knight’s objection and show why it rests upon a misunderstanding.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Thomas Talbott (1995). Hell. Faith and Philosophy 12 (1):143-148.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Thomas Talbott (1995). Three Pictures of God In Western Theology. Faith and Philosophy 12 (1):79-94.
    I begin with an inconsistent set of three propositions, each of which has the following characteristic: We can find prima facie support for it in the Bible. I then classify theologians according to which proposition they reject, and I identify three different pictures of God: the Augustinian picture, the Arminian picture, and the universalist picture. Finally, I explore some hermeneutical problems and suggest a way in which those who hold the universalist picture might interpret some of the texts upon which (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Thomas Talbott (1994). The Problem of Hell. Review of Metaphysics 48 (2):414-415.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Thomas Talbott (1993). Punishment, Forgiveness, and Divine Justice. Religious Studies 29 (2):151 - 168.
    According to a long theological tradition that stretches back at least as far as St Augustine, God's justice and mercy are distinct, and in many ways quite different, character traits. In his great epic poem, Paradise Lost, for example, John Milton goes so far as to suggest a conflict, perhaps even a contradiction, in the very being of God; he thus describes Christ's offer of himself as an atonement this way.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Thomas Talbott (1993). Theological Fatalism and Modal Confusion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 33 (2):65-88.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Thomas Talbott (1992). Craig on the Possibility of Eternal Damnation. Religious Studies 28 (4):495 - 510.
    I believe that Craig's arguments for the possibility of (DT) are important for two reasons: first, because the line he takes, though unsuccessful in my opinion, is the most plausible (or least implausible) line available; and second, because he sets forth with startling clarity some of the propositions that someone who takes this line must be willing to accept. But in the end, I shall argue, he not only fails to establish that (DT) is possible; he also fails in the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Thomas Talbott (1990). Providence, Freedom, and Human Destiny. Religious Studies 26 (2):227 - 245.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Thomas P. Talbott (1990). ``The Doctrine of Everlasting Punishment&Quot. Faith and Philosophy 7 (1):19-43.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Thomas B. Talbott (1988). On Free Agency and the Concept of Power. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 69 (September):241-54.
  24. Thomas B. Talbott (1988). On the Divine Nature and the Nature of Divine Freedom. Faith and Philosophy 5 (1):3-24.
    In my paper, I defend a view that many would regard as self-evidently false: the view that God’s freedom, his power to act, is in no way limited by his essential properties. I divide the paper into five sections. In section i, I call attention to a special class of non-contingent propositions and try to identify an important feature of these propositions; in section ii, I provide some initial reasons. based in part upon the unique features of these special propositions, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Thomas Talbott (1986). Free Will and Values. [REVIEW] International Philosophical Quarterly 26 (3):300-301.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Thomas B. Talbott (1986). On Divine Foreknowledge and Bringing About the Past. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 46 (3):455-469.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Thomas B. Talbott (1982). Quinn on Divine Commands and Moral Requirements. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (4):193 - 208.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Thomas B. Talbott (1979). Indeterminism and Chance Occurrences. Personalist 60 (July):253-261.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Thomas Talbott, C. S. Lewis and the Problem of Evil.
    Such was the innocent mind that first encountered The Problem of Pain and was exposed, for the first time, to the world of philosophical theology. Reading ",.- the book was like eating forbidden fruit; it was exhilarating but also a bit fright- ..„;, ening. For one thing, the book actually contained arguments, even arguments",,-" about God, and more importantly the arguments seemed to make sense! At the ".,'-„. small fundamentalist high school I attended, I had, to be sure, encountered ";!,' (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation