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  1. Thomas W. Dunfee (forthcoming). The World is Flat in the Twenty-First Century: A Response to Hasnas. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  2. Thomas W. Dunfee & Thomas Donaldson (forthcoming). Contractarian Business Ethics: Current Status and Next Steps. Business Ethics Quarterly.
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  3. Thomas W. Dunfee (2007). The Kasky-Nike Threat to Corporate Social Reporting. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1):5-32.
    In the recent case of Nike v. Kasky both sides argued that their standard for distinguishing commercial speech from political speechwould create the better policy for ensuring accurate and complete disclosure of social information by corporations. Using insights frominformation economics, we argue that neither standard will achieve the policy goal of optimal truthful disclosure. Instead, we argue that the appropriate standard is one of optimal truthful disclosure—balancing the value of speech against the costs of misinformation. Specifically, we argue that an (...)
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  4. Thomas W. Dunfee (2007). The World is Flat in the Twenty-First Century. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (3):427-431.
    Hasnas is correct that ethicists should pay attention to law and be on guard for perverse effects from regulation and legal interpretations that may encourage or require unethical behavior. He is not correct that the business ethics literature assumes that law and ethics consistently pull in the same direction. Analysis of the relationship between law and ethics requires nuanced, in-depth treatment. An example is provided regarding the well-known case of United States v. Park. Ultimately, there is a need for more (...)
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  5. Thomas W. Dunfee & Colleen Baker (2007). The Impact of Dirty Money on Global Capitalism. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):729-742.
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  6. David Hess & Thomas W. Dunfee (2007). Special Section on Commercial Speech-the Kasky-Nike Threat to Corporate Social Reporting: Implementing a Standard of Optimal Truthful Disclosure as a Solution. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1):5.
     
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  7. Thomas W. Dunfee (2006). A Critical Perspective of Integrative Social Contracts Theory: Recurring Criticisms and Next Generation Research Topics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):303 - 328.
    During the past ten years Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT) has become part of the repertoire of specialized decision-oriented theories in the business ethics literature. The intention here is to (1)␣provide a brief overview of the structure and strengths of ISCT; (2) identify recurring themes in the extensive commentary on the theory including brief mention of how ISCT has been applied outside the business ethics literature; (3) describe where research appears to be headed; and (4) specify challenges faced by those (...)
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  8. Thomas W. Dunfee (2006). Do Firms with Unique Competencies for Rescuing Victims of Human Catastrophes Have Special Obligations? Corporate Responsibility and the AIDS Catastrophe in Sub-Saharan Africa. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):185-210.
    Abstract: Firms possessing a unique competency to rescue the victims of a human catastrophe have a minimum moral obligation to devote substantial resources toward best efforts to aid the victims. The minimum amount that firms should devote to rescue is the largest sum of their most recent year’s investment in social initiatives, their five-year trend, their industry’s average, or the national average. Financial exigency may justify a lower level of investment. Alternative social investments may be continued if they have an (...)
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  9. Thomas W. Dunfee (2006). Do Firms With Unique Competencies for Rescuing Victims of Human Catastrophes Have Special Obligations? Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):185-210.
    Firms possessing a unique competency to rescue the victims of a human catastrophe have a minimum moral obligation to devote substantial resources toward best efforts to aid the victims. The minimum amount that firms should devote to rescue is the largest sum of their most recent year’s investment in social initiatives, their five-year trend, their industry’s average, or the national average. Financial exigency may justify a lower level of investment. Alternative social investments may be continued if they have an equally (...)
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  10. Mark S. Schwartz, Thomas W. Dunfee & Michael J. Kline (2005). Tone at the Top: An Ethics Code for Directors? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):79 - 100.
    . Recent corporate scandals have focused the attention of a broad set of constituencies on reforming corporate governance. Boards of directors play a leading role in corporate governance and any significant reforms must encompass their role. To date, most reform proposals have targeted the legal, rather than the ethical obligations of directors. Legal reforms without proper attention to ethical obligations will likely prove ineffectual. The ethical role of directors is critical. Directors have overall responsibility for the ethics and compliance programs (...)
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  11. Danielle E. Warren, Thomas W. Dunfee & Naihe Li (2004). Social Exchange in China: The Double-Edged Sword of Guanxi. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):355 - 372.
    We present two studies that examine the effects of guanxi on multiple social groups from the perspective of Chinese business people. Study 1 (N = 203) tests the difference in perceived effects of six guanxi contextualizations. Study 2 (N = 195) examines the duality of guanxi as either helpful or harmful to social groups, depending on the contextualization. Findings suggest guanxi may result in positive as well as negative outcomes for focal actors and the aggregate.
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  12. Thomas W. Dunfee (2003). Social Investing: Mainstream or Backwater? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (3):247 - 252.
    Social investing, though not yet fully mainstream, has the potential to obtain such status. Questions relating to the future of social investing include the following. (1) What properly falls within the ambit of social investing? Assuming that no single definition of social responsibility is feasible, what then are the limits? (2) What do we need to know about investor psychology concerning social investing? What motivates people to buy socially screened investments and why do they sometimes act inconsistently? (3) How can (...)
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  13. Norman E. Bowie & Thomas W. Dunfee (2002). Confronting Morality in Markets. Journal of Business Ethics 38 (4):381 - 393.
    When an organization is pressured to respond to moral expressions in capital, consumer and labor markets, it faces a dilemma of how to respond. Should Shell have given in to Greenpeace in deciding how to dispose of the Brent Spar Oil Rig? Should Cracker Barrel give in to pressures to fire homosexual employees? Firms should consider the nature of the moral expressions pressuring them in deciding how to respond. Moral expressions can be divided into three descriptive categories: Benign, Disputed and (...)
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  14. Thomas W. Dunfee & Thomas J. Donaldson (2002). Untangling the Corruption Knot: Global Bribery Viewed Through the Lens of Integrative Social Contract Theory. In Norman E. Bowie (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics. Blackwell. 6--61.
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  15. Thomas W. Dunfee & Danielle E. Warren (2001). Is Guanxi Ethical? A Normative Analysis of Doing Business in China. Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):191 - 204.
    This paper extends the discussion of guanxi beyond instrumental evaluations and advances a normative assessment of guanxi. Our discussion departs from previous analyses by not merely asking, Does guanxi work? but rather Should corporations use guanxi? The analysis begins with a review of traditional guanxi definitions and the changing economic and legal environment in China, both necessary precursors to understanding the role of guanxi in Chinese business transactions. This review leads us to suggest that there are distinct types of, and (...)
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  16. Thomas Donaldson & Thomas W. Dunfee (2000). Precis for Ties That Bind. Business and Society Review 105 (4):436-443.
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  17. Thomas Donaldson & Thomas W. Dunfee (2000). Securing the Ties That Bind: A Response to Commentators. Business and Society Review 105 (4):480-492.
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  18. Thomas W. Dunfee (2000). Continuing the Conversation Dunfee Re Frederick: Nature and Norms. Business and Society Review 105 (4):493-501.
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  19. Thomas W. Dunfee (2000). Dunfee Re Frederick: Nature and Norms. Business and Society Review 105 (4):493-501.
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  20. Thomas W. Dunfee & Robert Gunther (1999). Ethical Issues in Financial Services. Business and Society Review 104 (1):5-12.
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  21. Thomas W. Dunfee (1998). The Marketplace of Morality. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):127-145.
    A marketplace of morality (MOM) is a place where individuals act under the influence of their moral desires. A MOM produces anoutput representing the aggregate acted-upon moral preferences of its participants. Individual behavior is influenced by POPs, or passions of propriety. People implement POP preferences when they buy stock, purchase goods and services, choose jobs and so on. Firms respond by social cause marketing and other devices which encourage customers to align their social preferences with those represented by the firm. (...)
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  22. Thomas W. Dunfee & Patricia Werhane (1997). Report on Business Ethics in North America. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (14):1589-1595.
    Although many challenges remain, business ethics is flourishing in North America. Prominent organizations give annual business ethics awards, investments in socially screened mutual funds are increasing, ethics officers and corporate ombudspersons are more common and more influential, and new ideas are being tested in practice. On the academic side, two major journals specializing in business ethics are well-established and other major journals often include articles on business ethics and new organizations emphasizing ethics have been initiated. Within business schools, the number (...)
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  23. Iwao Taka & Thomas W. Dunfee (1997). Japanese Moralogy as Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (5):507 - 519.
    Moralogy is an indigenous six-decade-old Japanese approach to business ethics which has been particularly influential among middle-sized business. The core themes of moralogy are (1) the inseparability of morality and economic activities, (2) the recognition of a difference between social justice and universal justice, and (3) an emphasis on identification of principles of supreme or universal morality. Moralogy recognizes moral liberty and a principle of "omni-directional fairness"; and may be best described as a virtue-based stakeholder approach to business ethics. It (...)
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  24. Thomas W. Dunfee & Bruce M. Black (1996). Ethical Issues Confronting Travel Agents. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (2):207 - 217.
    This article provides an overview of current and prospective ethical issues facing commercial (as opposed to leisure) travel agents. Industry wide ethical issues include conflicting pressures from suppliers and clients, competency requirements for agents and misleading advertising and sales claims (vaporware in industry jargon). Issues with travel suppliers include calculation and payment of commissions, fare loopholes, frequent flyer plans and the use and abuse of benefits directed to individual employees. Issues with corporate clients of travel agents include hidden preferred carriers (...)
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  25. Christopher J. Cowton & Thomas W. Dunfee (1995). Internationalizing the Business Ethics Curriculum: A Survey. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (5):331 - 338.
    This article reports on a telephone survey of business school faculty in the United Kingdom, Asia and North America concerning efforts to internationalize the teaching of business ethics. International dimensions of business ethics are currently given only limited coverage in the business school curriculum with over half of the faculty surveyed indicating that less then 10% of their ethics teaching focuses on global issues. Teaching objectives vary widely with some faculty emphasizing a relativistic, diversity oriented perspective while others stress the (...)
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  26. Thomas Donaldson & Thomas W. Dunfee (1995). Integrative Social Contracts Theory. Economics and Philosophy 11 (01):85-.
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  27. Thomas W. Dunfee (1995). Introduction to the Special Issue on Social Contracts and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (2):167-171.
    This article introduces several papers on social contracts and business ethics, published in the April 2005 issue of the journal "Business Ethics Quarterly.".
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  28. Thomas W. Dunfee (1994). A Response to Richard T. De George's “Business as a Humanity”. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:33-41.
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  29. Thomas W. Dunfee (1994). Business Ethics in Russia: Business Ethics in the New Russia: A Report. Business Ethics 3 (1):1–3.
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  30. Thomas W. Dunfee & Virginia G. Maurer (1992). Corporate Attorney Whistle-Blowing: Devising a Proper Standard. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 11 (3/4):3-39.
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  31. Thomas W. Dunfee (1991). Business Ethics and Extant Social Contracts. Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (1):23-51.
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  32. Thomas W. Dunfee (1991). Beyond the Law: A Brief Ethical Analysis of Milken's Securities Violations. Journal of Social Philosophy 22 (1):137-145.
  33. Thomas W. Dunfee & Diana C. Robertson (1988). Integrating Ethics Into the Business School Curriculum. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):847 - 859.
    A project on teaching business ethics at The Wharton School concluded that ethics should be directly incorporated into key MBA courses and taught by the core business faculty. The project team, comprised of students, ethics faculty and functional business faculty, designed a model program for integrating ethics. The project was funded by the Exxon Education Foundation.The program originates with a general introduction designed to familiarize students with literature and concepts pertaining to professional and business ethics and corporate social responsibility. This (...)
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