27 found
Sort by:
  1. Thomasine Kushner (2004). CQ Interview: When Things Go Wrong: Managing Crisis—A Talk with Harry M. Jansen Kraemer, Jr., and Sally Benjamin Young. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (02):193-199.
    In the fall of 2001, Baxter International, Inc., was faced with a crisis after more than 50 people died using Baxter dialyzers. In this interview, Harry M. Jansen Kraemer, Jr., Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Baxter, and Sally Benjamin Young, Vice President, Communications, discuss how the company managed this emergency situation.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Thomasine Kushner (2003). Public-Private Partnerships in Drug Development for Underdeveloped Countries: An Interview with Craig Wheeler, President of Chiron's Biopharmaceutical Division. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (04):429-433.
    In an effort to create a mechanism for addressing a critical need of providing medicines for economically developing countries, the Chiron Corporation and the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development have entered into an innovative public-private partnership. In the following interview, Craig Wheeler discusses the origins and nature of this agreement that could set a pattern for how corporations and nonprofit organizations can work together in drug development.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thomasine Kushner (2002). CQ Interview. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):97-101.
    Chris Shaw is the Chair of Biotechnology and Head of the Pharmaceutical Biotechnology Research Group at the University of Ulster in Northern Ireland. His concern for the unequal distribution of benefits has prompted him to take a leading role in developing partnership models for scientists doing research in underdeveloped countries.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Thomasine Kushner (2002). CQ InterviewChris Shaw on Ethical Issues in Biotechnology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (1):97-101.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Thomasine Kushner & David Thomasma (2001). “Help Me Die”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):451-452.
    As a medical student doing a rotation, I was feeling positive as we knocked on the door of an elderly lady who I'd seen just 2 days earlier. Even though seriously ill for many months, this patient had always lived life in her own way, refusing to go to a nursing home. It was clear that her condition had deteriorated rapidly, and the nurse informed me privately that she was dying, sooner rather than later.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. David C. Thomasma, Thomasine Kushner & Steve Heilig (2000). From the Editors Terra Incognita: Uncharted Terrain Between Doctors and Patients. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (1):1-2.
    New beginnings give us the opportunity to do better “the next time.” In the rush to welcome the new millennium, it is fitting to take time to look more thoughtfully at issues not adequately covered in decades past. Robert Frost's musing about less traveled roads gives poetic life to the theme of this CQ Special Section, exploring some of the all too unknown territory between doctors and patients.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Thomasine Kushner (1996). Stanton Glantz on Snuffing Tobacco Research. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (03):415-.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert L. Schwartz & Thomasine Kushner (1996). The Role of Institutional and Community Based Ethics Committees in the Debate on Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (01):121-.
    In many countries the debate over the role that physicians may play in ending life has been limited to the judiciary and other law making institutions, professional medical organizations; and academics. Because of their multidisciplinary and diverse membership, ethics committees may be a particularly appropriate venue through which these discussions can be expanded to include a much larger community. In addition, ethics committees generally act in only advisory capacities because they do not actually make decisions, so they may provide a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (eds.) (1996). Birth to Death: Science and Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Biology has been advancing with explosive pace over the last few years and in so doing has raised a host of ethical issues. This book, aimed at the general reader, reviews the major advances of recent years in biology and medicine and explores their ethical implications. From birth to death the reader is taken on a tour of human biology - covering genetics, reproduction, development, transplantation, aging, dying and also the use of animals in research and the impact of human (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Thomasine Kushner (1995). Jessica Mitford Discusses Attitudes on Aging. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (02):133-.
    Our attitudes toward aging change in that “old” depends on where you are. When I was 16, and my sister Nancy was 29, I suddenly realized, to my horror, that one of us was about to be 30. I went around saying to everyone, “Poor Nancy, she's almost 40,” because to me at that time, 30 and 40 were about the same. Later, when Nancy was 40, she said she didn't mind because, according to me, she had been 40 for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Thomasine Kushner (1995). Richard Selzer on Death, Resurrection, and Compassion. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (04):494-.
  12. David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kushner (1995). A Dialogue on Compassion and Supererogation in Medicine. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (04):415-.
    According to Frankena, “the moral point of view is what Alison Wilde and Heather Badcock did not have.” Most of us, however, are not such extreme examples. We are capable of the moral point of view, but we fail to take the necessary time or make the required efforts. We resist pulling ourselves from other distractions to focus on the plight of others and what we might do to ameliorate their suffering. Perhaps compassion is rooted in understanding what it is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Thomasine Kushner & Charles MacKay (1994). Joseph J. Jacobs on Alternative Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (03):442-.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Thomasine Kushner (1993). CQ Interview: Derek Humphry on Death with Dignity Thomasine Kushner. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (01):57-.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Thomasine Kushner (1992). U. S. Senator Al Gore Discusses Adjusting Priorities in Healthcare. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (03):249-.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Thomasine Kushner (1992). When Do Organs Become “Spare Parts”? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (04):349-.
    Baby Theresa, in her short 9-day life, cast a national spotlight on the question “Should anencephalic infants be used for organ procurement?” In denying her parents′ wishes to donate the baby's healthy organs to other children in need of kidneys, liver, heart, and lungs, Circuit Court Judge Estella Moriarty said, “I cannot authorized someone to take your baby's life, however short, however unsatisfactory, to save another child.”In citing a1988 Florida statute that does not allow a person to be declared dead (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Thomasine Kushner, Raymond A. Belliotti & Donald Buckner (1991). Toward a Methodology for Moral Decision Making in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (4).
    The failure of medical codes to provide adequate guidance for physicians' moral dilemmas points to the fact that some rules of analysis, informed by moral theory, are needed to assist in resolving perplexing ethical problems occurring with increasing frequency as medical technology advances. Initially, deontological and teleological theories appear more helpful, but critcisms can be lodged against both, and neither proves to be sufficient in itself. This paper suggests that to elude the limitations of previous approaches, a method of moral (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Thomasine Kushner & Stuart F. Spicker (1990). Editors' Introduction: Document Exchange. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 2 (1):1-2.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Thomasine Kushner (1989). Networks Across America: Santa Rosa Long Term Care Cooperative Bioethics Forum Council of Southern California Bioethics Network. Hastings Center Report 19 (1):24.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Thomasine Kushner (1988). Legal Notes: Networks Across America. Hastings Center Report 18 (1):13-14.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Thomasine Kushner (1988). Networks Across America. Hastings Center Report 18 (4):28-28.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Joan Mclver Gibson & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (1986). Will the “Conscience of an Institution” Become Society's Servant? Hastings Center Report 16 (3):9-11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Thomasine Kushner (1982). Structural Similarities: A Base for Descriptive Corollaries Among the Arts. Philosophica 30.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Thomasine Kushner (1981). Interpretations of Life and Prohibitions Against Killing. Environmental Ethics 3 (2):147-154.
    While Eastern and Western cultures agree that life is sacred, and that morality demands its protection, they differ sharply as to how the term life is to be interpreted, and therefore what prohibitions against killing should entail. l examine some of these conflicting perspectives, explore life as an ambiguous term, and suggest are interpretation of the concept, which permits moral ruIes against killing to be applied more rationally.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Thomasine Kushner (1980). The Status of the Aesthetic Clone. Journal of Value Inquiry 14 (3-4):309-318.
    As duplicating techniques in art become more sophisticated and less easily detectable, Concern mounts as to what the status of these aesthetic clones should be. Can they be considered works of art; and to what extent do they share in the value of the original? this paper examines these questions, Using examples from audio and visual arts, And concludes that talk of an original and its copies has to do with the art market and not with the creative process. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Thomasine Kushner (1980). Yang Chu: Ethical Egoist in Ancient China. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (4):319-325.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Thomasine Kushner (1979). The Question of Definition Revisited. Journal of Critical Analysis 8 (1):5-13.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation