Search results for 'Thompson Clarke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles Hartshorne, Ernest Hocking, Amélie Oksenberg Rorty, V. C. Chappell, Robert Whittemore, Glenn A. Olds, Samuel M. Thompson, W. Norris Clarke, Eliseo Vivas & E. S. Salmon (1956). Comments on Stallknecht's Theses. Review of Metaphysics 9 (3):464 - 481.score: 2400.0
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  2. P. J. Allmark, J. Boote, E. Chambers, A. Clarke, A. McDonnell, A. Thompson & A. Tod (2009). Ethical Issues in the Use of in-Depth Interviews: Literature Review and Discussion. Research Ethics 5 (2):48-54.score: 2400.0
    This paper reports a literature review on the topic of ethical issues in in-depth interviews. The review returned three types of article: general discussion, issues in particular studies, and studies of interview-based research ethics. Whilst many of the issues discussed in these articles are generic to research ethics, such as confidentiality, they often had particular manifestations in this type of research. For example, privacy was a significant problem as interviews sometimes probe unexpected areas. For similar reasons, it is difficult to (...)
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  3. M. L. Clarke, W. B. Thompson & J. D. Ridge (1971). Catalogue of the National Collection of Greek and Latin School Textbooks. Journal of Hellenic Studies 91:217.score: 2400.0
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  4. James Thompson (2012). Democracy, Monism and the Common Good: Rethinking William Clarke's Political Religion. History of European Ideas 38 (2):233-247.score: 420.0
    Summary This article re-examines the political thought of the neglected Fabian essayist and radical journalist William Clarke. Historians have differed over the relative importance of socialism and liberalism in Clarke's political thought. The argument is made here that the key to Clarke's thought lies in his moralised conception of democracy, rooted in his monist ontology. The further deepening of democracy was threatened for Clarke by developments in monopolistic capitalism and the related emergence of a new imperialism. (...)
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  5. E. S. Thompson (1891). The Evagoras of Isocrates, with an Introduction and Notes by Henry Clarke, M. A. Swan Sonnenschein and Co. 2s. 6d. The Classical Review 5 (09):429-430.score: 360.0
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  6. Thompson Clarke (1972). The Legacy of Skepticism. Journal of Philosophy 64 (20):754-769.score: 240.0
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  7. Thompson M. Clarke (1952). Reflections on Likeness of Meaning. Philosophical Studies 3 (1):9 - 13.score: 240.0
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  8. Thompson M. Clarke (1997). Refiections on Likrnos of Meaning. In Catherine Z. Elgin (ed.), Nelson Goodman's Theory of Symbols and its Applications. Garland Pub.. 4--131.score: 240.0
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  9. Thompson Clarke (1965). Seeing Surfaces and Physical Objects. In Max Black (ed.), Philosophy in America. George Allen & Unwin Ltd. 98-114.score: 240.0
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  10. Charles Sayward (2005). Thompson Clarke and the Problem of Other Minds. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (1):1-14.score: 210.0
    The force of sceptical inquiries into out knowledge of other people is a paradigm of the force that philosophical views can have. Sceptical views arise out of philosophical inquiries that are identical in all major respects with inquiries that we employ in ordinary cases. These inquiries employ perfectly mundane methods of making and assessing claims to know. This paper tries to show that these inquiries are conducted in cases that lack certain contextual ingredients found in ordinary cases. The paper concludes (...)
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  11. Norris Clarke (1999). The Thomism of Norris Clarke. Philosophy and Theology 11 (2):265-285.score: 210.0
    William Norris Clarke, S.J., one of the leading Thomist scholars in the United States, came to the Philippines recently and delivered a series of lectures in the Ateneo de Manila University and the University of Santo Tomas on various philosophical topics inspired by the thought of St. Thomas. Fr. Clarke is now a Professor Emeritus of Philosophy in Fordham University. He was co-founder and editor (l961-85) of the International Philosophical Quarterly and is the author of some 60 articles, (...)
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  12. Samuel Clarke (1956). The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence: Together with Extracts From Newton's Principia and Opticks. Barnes & Noble.score: 210.0
    This book presents extracts from Leibniz's letters to Newtonian scientist Samuel Clarke.
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  13. Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins (2011). The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08. Broadview Press.score: 210.0
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that (...)
     
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  14. W. Norris Clarke & Gerald A. McCool (eds.) (1988). The Universe as Journey: Conversations with W. Norris Clarke, S.J. Fordham University Press.score: 210.0
    W. Norris Clarke's metaphysics of the universe as a journey rests on six major positions: the unrestricted dynamism of the mind, the primacy of the act of existence, the participation structure of reality, and the person, considered as both the starting point of philosophy and the source of the categories needed for a flexible contemporary metaphysics. Reflecting on his conscious life and the universe around him, the finite person mounts by a two-fold path to its Infinite source, who, though (...)
     
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  15. Per Sandin, Erland Mårald, Aidan Davison, David E. Nye & Paul B. Thompson (2013). Book Symposium on The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics by Paul B. Thompson. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (3):301-320.score: 180.0
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  16. Evan Thompson (2005). Neurophenomenology: An Introduction for Neurophilosophers Evan Thompson, Antoine Lutz, and Diego Cosmelli. In Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press. 40.score: 180.0
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  17. Dudley Montague Clarke (1984). Keston Clarke. The Chesterton Review 10 (1):109-110.score: 180.0
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  18. Bridget Clarke (2008). Thomas Stringer, Locke, Shaftesbury, and Edward Clarke: New Archival Discoveries. Locke Studies 8:171-199.score: 180.0
     
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  19. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz & Samuel Clarke (2007). The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub. Ltd..score: 180.0
  20. Carolyn Raffensperger, Mora Campbell & Paul B. Thompson (1998). Considering The Spirit of the Soil by Paul B. Thompson. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):161-176.score: 180.0
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  21. Paul B. Thompson & Thomas C. Hilde (eds.) (2000). The Agrarian Roots of Pragmatism / Edited by Paul B. Thompson and Thomas C. Hilde. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 180.0
    The essays in this volume critically analyze and revitalize agrarian philosophy by tracing its evolution in the classical American philosophy of key figures such as Franklin, Jefferson, Emerson, Thoreau, Dewey, and Royce.
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  22. E. Seymer Thompson (1909). Q. Asconii Pediani Commentarii. Recognovit A. C. Clark. (Oxford Text). The Classical Review 23 (01):21-22.score: 120.0
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  23. George D. W. Berry (1952). Review: Thompson M. Clarke, Reflections on Likeness of Meaning. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 17 (3):215-216.score: 120.0
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  24. John Thompson (1983). Stuart D. McLean. Humanity in the Thought of Karl Barth. Pp. Viii + 202. (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1981.) £ 5.95. Religious Studies 19 (4):530.score: 120.0
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  25. Clark Thompson (1982). Hume's Philosophy of Mind. Philosophical Books 23 (3):159-161.score: 100.0
  26. David A. Mccormick, David G. Lavond, Gregory A. Clark, Ronald E. Kettner, Christina E. Rising & Richard F. Thompson (1981). The Engram Found? Role of the Cerebellum in Classical Conditioning of Nictitating Membrane and Eyelid Responses. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (3):103-105.score: 80.0
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  27. Lynn Clark Callister, Karlen E. Luthy, Pam Thompson & Rae Jeanne Memmott (2009). Ethical Reasoning in Baccalaureate Nursing Students. Nursing Ethics 16 (4):499-510.score: 80.0
    Nurses are encountering an increasing number of ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. Ethics courses for baccalaureate nursing students provide the opportunity for the development of critical thinking skills in order to deal with these effectively. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to describe ethical reasoning in 70 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a nursing ethics course. Reflective clinical journals were analyzed as appropriate for qualitative inquiry. The overriding theme emerging from the data was `in the process of becoming', (...)
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  28. Charles Lydeard, Robert H. Cowie, Winston F. Ponder, Arthur E. Bogan, Philippe Bouchet, Stephanie A. Clark, Kevin S. Cummings, Terrence J. Frest, Olivier Gargominy, Dai G. Herbert, Robert Hershler, Kathryn E. Perez, Barry Roth, Mary Seddon, Ellen E. Strong & Fred G. Thompson (2004). The Global Decline of Nonmarine Mollusks. Bioscience 54 (4):321.score: 80.0
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  29. Brian Ribeiro (2006). Clarke and Stroud on the Plane-Spotters. Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (1):25-32.score: 60.0
    In an earlier paper ("Skeptical Parasitism and the Continuity Argument," 'Metaphilosophy' 2004: 714-732) I suggested that the well-known "plane-spotters" story-first proposed by Thompson Clarke and later developed by Barry Stroud-distorts the very skeptical view it aims to elucidate. However, considerations of space prohibited me from fleshing out my criticisms of the Clarke/Stroud story in that paper. In this paper I aim to fill in this lacuna by showing how the Clarke/Stroud story distorts the skeptic's view. I (...)
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  30. M. L. Clarke (1958). Rhetoric in Education Donald Lemen Clark: Rhetoric in Greco-Roman Education. Pp. Xii+285. New York: Columbia University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1957. Cloth, 36s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 8 (02):164-165.score: 60.0
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  31. W. Norris Clarke (1988). Award of the Aquinas Medal to Mary T. Clark. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 62:15-17.score: 60.0
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  32. Harrison B. Hall (1976). Criteria, Perception and Other Minds. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6 (June):257-274.score: 26.0
    The paper uses thompson clark's theory of the relation of perceptual parts and wholes to illuminate certain aspects of our knowledge of other minds. The thesis is that the traditional problem can be usefully broken down into two parts--One of which calls for a better understanding of the logic of perceptual concepts; the other, For a closer look at what happens when we try to take the epistemological skeptic seriously.
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  33. Robert H. Kane (1999). On Free Will, Responsibility and Indeterminism: Responses to Clarke, Haji, and Mele. Philosophical Explorations 2 (2):105-121.score: 24.0
    This paper responds to three critical essays on my book, The Significance of Free Will(Oxford, 1996) by Randolph Clarke, Istiyaque Haji and Alfred Mele (which essays appear in this issue and an earlier issue of this journal). This response first explains crucial features of the theory of free will of the book, including the notion of ultimate responsibility.The paper then answers objections of Haji and Mele that the occurrence of undetermined choices would be matters of luck or chance, and (...)
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  34. Clare Palmer (2011). Animal Disenhancement and the Non-Identity Problem: A Response to Thompson. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 5 (1):43-48.score: 24.0
    In his paper The Opposite of Human Enhancement: Nanotechnology and the Blind Chicken problem (Nanoethics 2:305–316, 2008) Paul Thompson argues that the possibility of disenhancing animals in order to improve animal welfare poses a philosophical conundrum. Although many people intuitively think such disenhancement would be morally impermissible, it’s difficult to find good arguments to support such intuitions. In this brief response to Thompson, I accept that there’s a conundrum here. But I argue that if we seriously consider whether (...)
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  35. Arianna Ferrari (2012). Animal Disenhancement for Animal Welfare: The Apparent Philosophical Conundrums and the Real Exploitation of Animals. A Response to Thompson and Palmer. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 6 (1):65-76.score: 24.0
    Abstract In his paper “The Opposite of Human Enhancement: Nanotechnology and the Blind Chicken problem” ( Nanoethics 2: 305-36, 2008) Thompson argued that technological attempts to reduce or eliminate selected non-human animals’ capabilities (animal disenhancements) in order to solve or mitigate animal welfare problems in animals’ use pose a philosophical conundrum, because there is a contradiction between rational arguments in favor of these technological interventions and intuitions against them. In her response “Animal Disenhancement and the Non-Identity Problem: A Response (...)
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  36. Lee A. McBride (2012). Agrarian Ideals and Practices: Comments on Paul B. Thompson's The Agrarian Vision. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):535-541.score: 24.0
    In The Agrarian Vision , Thompson argues that a better appreciation of agrarian ideals could lead to a more virtuous, more sustainable way of life. While I agree with Thompson in many respects, there are some aspects of the book that I question and others that I would like to hear Thompson explicate in greater detail. In this paper, I question Thompson’s claim that agrarian farmers and farming communities serve as ideal models of virtuous habits and (...)
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  37. Marleen Rozemond (2008). The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke-Collins Correspondenc. In Tom Lennon & Robert Stainton (eds.), The Achilles of Rational Psychology.score: 24.0
    The Clarke-Collins correspondence was widely read and frequently printed during the 18th century. Its central topic is the question whether matter can think, or be conscious. Samuel Clarke defends the immateriality of the subject of the mental against Anthony Collins’ materialism. This paper examines important assumptions about the nature of body that play a role in their debate. Clarke argued that consciousness requires an “individual being”, an entity with some sort of significant unity as its subject. They (...)
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  38. Grahame Clark (1985). Gertrude Caton Thompson, 1888-1985. Proceedings of the British Academy 71:523-531.score: 22.0
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  39. Clark Wolf (2013). Paul Thompson. The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 35 (2):251-254.score: 22.0
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  40. Brian P. McLaughlin & Gary Bartlett (2004). Peer Commentary on Are There Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Have Noe and Thompson Cast Doubt on the Neural Correlates of Consciousness Programme? Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (1):56-67.score: 21.0
  41. Daniel C. Dennett, Comments on Evan Thompson, Mind in Life.score: 18.0
    I have learned a lot from Evan Thompson’s book–his scholarship is formidable, and his taste for relatively overlooked thinkers is admirable–but I keep stumbling over the strain induced by his self-assigned task of demonstrating that his heroes–Varela and Maturana, Merleau-Ponty and (now) Husserl, Oyama and Moss and others–have shattered the comfortable assumptions of orthodoxy, and outlined radical new approaches to the puzzles of life and mind. The irony is that Thompson is such a clear and conscientious expositor that (...)
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  42. John Protevi, Deleuze, Jonas, and Thompson Toward a New Transcendental Aesthetic and a New Question of Panpsychism.score: 18.0
    Both Deleuze in DR and Thompson / Jonas can be fairly said to be biological panpsychists. That‘s pretty much what ―Mind in Life‖ means: mind and life are co-extensive: life = autopoiesis and cognition = sense-making. Thus Mind in Life = autopoietic sense-making = control of action of organism in environment. Sense-making here is three-fold: 1) sensibility as openness to environment; 2) signification as positive or negative valence of environmental features relative to the subjective norms of the organism; 3) (...)
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  43. Bo C. Klintberg (2011). On Samuel Clarke's Four Types of Deists. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (1):85-99.score: 18.0
    This paper features a detailed philosophical classification of the four types of deists that Samuel Clarke presents in the second series of the Boyle Lectures for promoting Christianity (1705). In the course of this paper I determine, for each type of deist, the truth values of twelve important propositions, and I show that these four types of deists may be categorized as (1) ‘no-providence’, (2) ‘physical-laws-providence’, (3) ‘moral-but-no-afterlife’, and (4) ‘moral-and-afterlife’. Using an accompanying table of propositions as a visualization (...)
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  44. Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (1999). Leibniz's Argument for the Identity of Indiscernibles in His Correspondence with Clarke. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (4):429 – 438.score: 18.0
    In Section 21 of his fifth letter to Clarke Leibniz attempts to derive the Identity of Indiscernibles from an application of the Principle of Sufficient Reason to God´s act of creation, namely that God has a reason to create the world he creates. In this paper I argue that this argument fails, not just because the Identity of Indiscernibles is false, but because there is a counterexample to one of the premises that Leibniz cannot satisfactorily rule out.
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  45. Robin Attfield (2004). Rousseau, Clarke, Butler and Critiques of Deism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (3):429 – 443.score: 18.0
    Rousseau’s stance on natural religion, revealed religion and their relation are outlined (section 1), and then his agreements and disagreements with Samuel Clarke (section 2). After a survey of Joseph Butler's critique of deism (section 3), Rousseau’s arguments emerge as capable of supplying a counter-critique sufficient to show that deism could claim to have survived the eighteenth-century undefeated (section 4). If the attempted refutation of theistic arguments on the parts of David Hume and of Immanuel Kant was inconclusive (section (...)
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  46. E. J. Coffman (2011). Clarke's Defense of the Contrast Argument. Dialectica 65 (2):267-275.score: 18.0
    In his (2004), Randolph Clarke assesses an important version of an influential argument against libertarianism about metaphysical freedom. Clarke calls the anti-libertarian argument he evaluates the Contrast Argument. It targets the following claim: there could be an undetermined free act done by S such that S would have freely done something else had S not done the act in question. This modal claim will be endorsed not only by proponents of main brands of libertarianism, but also by action (...)
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  47. Erin McKenna (2012). Feminism and Farming: A Response to Paul Thompson's the Agrarian Vision. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):529-534.score: 18.0
    Feminism and Farming: A Response to Paul Thompson’s the Agrarian Vision Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-6 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9328-0 Authors Erin McKenna, Department of Philosophy, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  48. Albert Ribas (2003). Leibniz' "Discourse on the Natural Theology of the Chinese" and the Leibniz-Clarke Controversy. Philosophy East and West 53 (1):64-86.score: 18.0
    Leibniz was writing his "Discourse on the Natural Theology of the Chinese" as the Leibniz-Clarke Controversy developed. Both were terminated by his death. These two fronts show interesting doctrinal correlations. The first is Leibniz' concern for the "decadence of natural religion." The dispute with Clarke began with it, and the Discourse is a defense of Chinese natural religion in order to show its agreement with Christian natural religion. The Controversy can be summed up as "clockmaker God versus idle (...)
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  49. Michael Wenisch (2010). The Epistemological Roots of the Dispute Over Time and Freedom in the Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence. International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):201-220.score: 18.0
    Historians and philosophers of science commonly ignore the epistemological disagreement about the theoretical limits of rationality that underlies the disputes over the absoluteness or relationality of time and the true nature of divine freedom in the Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence. Accordingly, I explore both the logical interconnectedness and the deeper philosophical roots of these disputes, with a view to evaluating the contrast in Leibniz’s and Clarke’s underlying notions of the limits of rationality. In tracing this contrast, I attempt to show (...)
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  50. Raymond Anthony (2012). Author Meets Critics Panel: Paul B. Thompson's (2010) The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):499-501.score: 18.0
    Author Meets Critics Panel: Paul B. Thompson’s (2010) The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9340-4 Authors Raymond Anthony, Department of Philosophy, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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