Search results for 'Thought and thinking' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  69
    Christopher Gauker (1995). Thinking Out Loud: An Essay on the Relation Between Thought and Language. Princeton University Press.
    An Essay on the Relation Between Thought and Language Christopher Gauker. things possible? How, having once perceived the herds by the lake, does the agent remember this for later use? My answer is that one way he may do it is ...
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  2. Barbara Abbott (1995). Natural Language and Thought: Thinking in English. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (2):49-55.
  3.  23
    Thomas de Koninck (1994). Aristotle on God As Thought Thinking Itself. Review of Metaphysics 47 (3):471-515.
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  4. George Lakoff (2003). How the Body Shapes Thought: Thinking with an All-Too-Human Brain. In A. J. Sanford & P. N. Johnson-Laird (eds.), The Nature and Limits of Human Understanding. T & T Clark 49.
     
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  5.  4
    Johannes Degenaar (1976). Critical Notice: Thought Thinking Against Itself. Philosophical Papers 5 (2):162-165.
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  6. Deborah Cook (2007). Thought Thinking Itself. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 38:229-247.
     
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  7.  10
    G. YounG (2008). On How a Child's Awareness of Thinking Informs Explanations of Thought Insertion. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):848-862.
    Theories of thought insertion have tended to favour either the content of the putatively alien thought or some peculiarity within the experience itself as a means of explaining why the subject differentiates one thought from another in terms of personal ownership. There are even accounts that try to incorporate both of these characteristics. What all of these explanations share is the view that it is unexceptional for us to experience thought as our own. The aim of (...)
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  8.  3
    Victoria Y. Allison-Bolger (2016). Locating Thought Insertion on the Map of Ordinary Thinking. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (3):235-238.
    In her account of thought insertion, Pedrini follows the prevailing view that it is an error about ‘who is thinking a thought.’ This view is based on a particular characterization of thinking as analogous to physical actions, where an object can be made, possessed, moved about, and put in and out of containers. This picture is well-suited for explaining thought insertion where the speaker talks of having the thoughts of others (...)
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  9.  39
    Corijn van Mazijk (2013). Mission Impossible? Thinking What Must Be Thought In Heidegger and Deleuze. Metajournal 5 (2):336-354.
    In this paper, I discuss and compare the possibility of thinking that which is most worth our thought in Deleuze’s What Is Philosophy? and Heidegger’s course lectures in What Is Called Thinking? . Both authors criticize the history of philosophy in similar ways in order to reconsider what should be taken as the nature and task of philosophical thinking. For Deleuze, true thinking is the creation of concepts, but what is most worth our thought (...)
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  10.  16
    Alisa Mandrigin, Concept of Self : Thinking of Oneself as a Subject of Thought.
    We can think about ourselves in a variety of ways, but only some of the thoughts that we entertain about ourselves will be thoughts which we know concern ourselves. I call these first-person thoughts, and the component of such thoughts that picks out the object about which one is thinking—oneself—the self-concept. In this thesis I am concerned with providing an account of the content of the self-concept. The challenge is to provide an account that meets two conditions on first-person (...)
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  11.  55
    David Cole, Images and Thinking: Critique of Arguments Against Images as a Medium of Thought.
    The Way of Ideas died an ignoble death, committed to the flames by behaviorist empiricists. Ideas, pictures in the head, perished with the Way. By the time those empiricists were supplanted at the helm by functionalists and causal theorists, a revolution had taken place in linguistics and the last thing anyone wanted to do was revive images as the medium of thought. Currently, some but not all cognitive scientists think that there probably are mental images - experiments in cognitive (...)
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  12.  10
    Jeong-Hyun Youn (2008). Non-Existent Existing God; Understanding of God From an East Asian Way of Thinking with Specific Reference to the Thought of Dasŏk Yoo Yŏng-Mo. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:881-905.
    This paper is an interpretation of the thought of the twentieth century Korean religious thinker, Yoo Yŏng-mo (柳永模, 1890-1981), a pioneer figure who sought to re-conceptualise a Christian understanding of the Ultimate Reality in the light of a positive openness to the plurality of Korean religions. Yoo Yŏng-mo considered that it was possible to present an overall picture of harmony and complementarity between the three traditions of Korea and Christianity, and this is endorsed by the present thesis. This essay (...)
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  13. Sheva Grumer Brun (1999). Thinking About Judaism: Philosophical Reflections on Jewish Thought. Jason Aronson, Inc..
    Thinking About Judaism: Philosophical Reflections on Jewish Thought examines the light shed by philosophy upon significant areas of Jewish life and academic studies, including Jewish history, Jewish ethics, Jewish law, and Jewish aesthetics. As the author clearly illustrates, the teachings of leading theorists on the subjects of general history, ethics, law, and aesthetics inspire us to think about corresponding subjects related to Judaica.
     
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  14.  81
    Jerry A. Fodor (2008). LOT 2: The Language of Thought Revisited. Oxford University Press.
    <span class='Hi'>Jerry</span> <span class='Hi'>Fodor</span> presents a new development of his famous Language of Thought hypothesis, which has since the 1970s been at the centre of interdisciplinary debate about how the mind works. <span class='Hi'>Fodor</span> defends and extends the groundbreaking idea that thinking is couched in a symbolic system realized in the brain. This idea is central to the representational <span class='Hi'>theory</span> of mind which <span class='Hi'>Fodor</span> has established as a key reference point in modern philosophy, psychology, and (...)
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  15.  5
    Aubrey L. Glazer (2011). A New Physiognomy of Jewish Thinking: Critical Theory After Adorno as Applied to Jewish Thought. Continuum.
    A new critical approach to Jewish thinking and praxis, drawing upon key thinkers such as Adorno, Wittgenstein, Gdel, Heidegger and Celan.
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  16. Ap Dijksterhuis & Zeger van Olden (2006). On the Benefits of Thinking Unconsciously: Unconscious Thought Can Increase Post-Choice Satisfaction. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 42 (5):627-631.
     
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  17.  25
    Takashi Yagisawa (1994). Thinking in Neurons: Comments on Stephen Schiffer's The Language-of-Thought Relation and its Implications. Philosophical Studies 76 (2-3):287-96.
  18. Michael Luntley (1995). Thinking of Individuals: A Prolegomenon to Any Future Theory of Thought. In The Philosophy of P. F. Strawson. New Delhi: Indian Coun Phil Res
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  19.  26
    David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson (2005). State-Dependent Thinking: A Comparison of Waking and Dreaming Thought. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):429-438.
    Thinking is known to be state dependent but a systematic study of how thinking in dreams differs from thinking while awake has not been done. The study consisted of analyzing the dream reports of 26 subjects who, in addition to providing dream reports also provided answers to questions about their thinking within the dream. Our hypothesis was that thinking in dreams is not monolithic but has two distinct components, one that is similar to wake-state cognition, (...)
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  20.  49
    Jitendranath Mohanty (1992). Reason and Tradition in Indian Thought: An Essay on the Nature of Indian Philosophical Thinking. Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Mohanty develops a new interpretation of the nature of Indian philsophical thinking. Using the original Sanskrit sources, he examines the concepts of consciousness and subjectivity, theories of language and logic, and meaning and truth, and explicates the concept of theoretical rationality which underlies the Indian philosophies. Mohanty brings to bear insights from modern western analytical and phenomenological philosophies, not so much for comparative purposes, but rather to interpret Indian thinking and to highlight its distinctive features.
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  21.  32
    Hannes Rakoczy (2010). From Thought to Language to Thought: Towards a Dialectical Picture of the Development of Thinking and Speaking. Grazer Philosophische Studien 81 (1):77-103.
    Lingualism claims there is no thought without language. At the other end of the theoretical spectrum, strong nativist 'Language of Thought' theories hold that public language is inessential to private thought. For an adequate empirical description of the ontogeny of thought and language, however, we need an intermediate position recognizing the dialectical interplay between pre-linguistic thought, language acquisition and the development of full-fledged linguistic reason. In this article recent findings from developmental and comparative psychology are (...)
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  22.  2
    P. Johannesma (1986). Eduardo Caianiello: Thought Processes and Thinking Machines. In G. Palm & A. Aertsen (eds.), Brain Theory. Springer 241--244.
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  23.  9
    Rosemary Varley (1998). Aphasic Language, Aphasic Thought: An Investigation of Propositional Thinking in an a-Propositional Aphasic. In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), Language and Thought: Interdisciplinary Themes. Cambridge University Press 128--145.
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  24.  65
    Richard R. Valencia (2010). Dismantling Contemporary Deficit Thinking: Educational Thought and Practice. Routledge.
    Dismantling Contemporary Deficit Thinking provides comprehensive critiques and anti-deficit thinking alternatives to this oppressive theory by framing the ...
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  25.  8
    Gabriel Ferreira da Silva (2015). “The Philosophical Thesis of the Identity of Thinking and Being is Just the Opposite of What It Seems to Be.” Kierkegaard on the Relations Between Being and Thought. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 20 (1):13-30.
    Kierkegaard is often regarded as an opponent of metaphysics per se. However, he not only implicitly espouses metaphysical positions, but also his understanding of existence rests upon an explicit metaphysical differentiation between being qua actuality and being qua thought, which results in a difference between actuality (Virkelighed) and reality (Realitet). I begin by analyzing an apparent contradiction between two of Kierkegaard’s statements on the relations between being and thought, which leads me both to inquire into that distinction and (...)
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  26.  16
    Cora Diamond (forthcoming). Asymmetries in Thinking About Thought in Advance. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
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  27.  8
    Julia Kristeva (2002). Thinking About Literary Thought. American Journal of Semiotics 18 (1/4):405-417.
    To these rather restrained opinions, one must add the unremitting efforts of the media but also of academia—these powers and institutions are decidedly united—who aim to ridicule and discredit for ever more literary theory’s encroachment, or attemptedencroachment, of its authority on literature. It may seem paradoxical that such a sparing, abstract, or even, as they say, insignificant activity should elicit such an . . . eroticization. Why so much passion for such an elusive object? We must look back to the (...)
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  28.  11
    Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2012). On Courage of Actions and Cowardice of Thinking: Leszek Nowak on the Provincialism of the Political Thought of Solidarność. In Krzysztof Brzechczyn & Katarzyna Paprzycka (eds.), Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities. Rodopi 217-234.
    In the opinion of many Western observers (e.g. Timothy Garton Ash) as well as Polish authors (e.g., Zdzisław Kransnodębski), the political thought of Solidarność was a mixture of ideas taken from different ideological traditions (right and left). What, in the aforementioned authors opinion, was a reason for pride was an object of criticism by Leszek Nowak, the eminent Polish philosopher, engaged in the movement. One of his most important charges against the political thought of this movement was its (...)
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  29.  5
    James E. Ford (1978). On Thinking About Aristotle's "Thought". Critical Inquiry 4 (3):589-596.
    An adequate approach to any of Aristotle's qualitative parts of tragedy must be grounded in an understanding of their hierarchical ranking within the Poetics. Any "whole" must present "a certain order in its arrangement of parts" ,1 and in a drama each part is "for the sake of" the one "above" it. Contrary to Rosenstein's formulation, for instance, the Aristotelian view is that character as a form "concretizes" and individualizes thought as matter. Rosenstein's question as to whether "these . (...)
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  30.  7
    C. Gere (2004). Thought in a Vat: Thinking Through Annie Cattrell. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (2):415-436.
    This essay reflects on some aspects of the brain in a vat problem through a consideration of the work of the sculptor Annie Cattrell. Cattrell’s series of sculptures ‘Sense’ render in three dimensions MRI scans of different sensory functions in the human brain. These objects—which could be said to represent thought itself stilled and suspended in a transparent medium—make dramatically visible the doctrine of the localization of brain function. The essay argues that the brain in a vat problem in (...)
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  31.  2
    Michael McGhee & Jitendra Nath Mohanty (1994). Reason and Tradition in Indian Thought: An Essay on the Nature of Indian Philosophical Thinking. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (176):377.
    In this book, Professor Mohanty develops a new interpretation of the ontology and nature of Indian philosophical thinking. Using the original Sanskrit sources, he examines the concepts of consciousness and subjectivity, and the theories of meaning and truth, and explicates the concept of theoretical rationality that underlies the Indian philosophies. The author brings to bear insights from modern Western analytical and phenomenological philosophies, not with a view to instituting direct comparisons but in order to interpret Indian thinking. In (...)
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  32. Dan I. Slobin (1996). From “Thought and Language” to “Thinking for Speaking”. In J. Gumperz & S. Levinson (eds.), Rethinking Linguistic Relativity. Cambridge University Press 17--70.
     
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  33. Louise M. Antony, What Are You Thinking? Character and Content in the Language of Thought.
  34.  3
    Ciencia Cognitiva (forthcoming). The Train of Thought: How Our Brain Responds to the Environment Whilst We Are Thinking in Terms of Mental Images or an Inner Voice. Ciencia Cognitiva.
    Mario Villena-González Laboratorio de Neurodinámica Básica y Aplicada, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile When our attention is internally oriented … Read More →.
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  35.  47
    Matthias Haase (2009). The Laws of Thought and the Power of Thinking. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (sup1):249-297.
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  36.  72
    Matt Ffytche (2011). Book Review: Angus Nicholls and Martin Liebscher (Eds) Thinking the Unconscious: Nineteenth-Century German Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 24 (3):133-137.
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  37.  12
    Laurence Goldstein (1999). Clear and Queer Thinking: Wittgenstein's Development and His Relevance to Modern Thought. Duckworth.
    Laurence Goldstein gives a straightforward and lively account of some of the central themes of Wittgenstein's writings on meaning, mind, and mathematics.
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  38.  35
    Guy Dove (2014). Thinking in Words: Language as an Embodied Medium of Thought. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):371-389.
    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the idea that natural language enhances and extends our cognitive capabilities. Supporters of embodied cognition have been particularly interested in the way in which language may provide a solution to the problem of abstract concepts. Toward this end, some have emphasized the way in which language may act as form of cognitive scaffolding and others have emphasized the potential importance of language-based distributional information. This essay defends a version of the (...)
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  39.  7
    Adam M. Perkins, Danilo Arnone, Jonathan Smallwood & Dean Mobbs (2015). Thinking Too Much: Self-Generated Thought as the Engine of Neuroticism. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (9):492-498.
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  40.  25
    Chan Kwok-Bun & Chan Nin (2010). Introduction: Thinking Freely, Acting Variously, or Thought as a Practice of Freedom. World Futures 66 (3 & 4):163 – 191.
  41.  48
    Shaun Gallagher (2004). The Interpersonal and Emotional Beginnings of Understanding: A Review of Peter Hobson's The Cradle of Thought: Exploring the Origins of Thinking. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (3):253-257.
  42. Bruce Novak (2009). The Audacity of Thought: Seeing Thinking as the Moral Virtue Pivotal to the Re-Founding of Democracy on a Moral Basis. Philosophical Studies in Education 40:83 - 93.
     
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  43.  2
    Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2012). On Courage of Actions and Cowardice of Thinking Leszek Nowak on the Provincialism of the Political Thought of Solidarno. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 100 (1):217-234.
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  44.  8
    Marcel Danesi (1990). Thinking is Seeing: Visual Metaphors and the Nature of Abstract Thought. Semiotica 80 (3-4):221-238.
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  45.  62
    Peter Slezak (2002). Thinking About Thinking: Language, Thought and Introspection. Language and Communication 22 (3):353-373.
    I do not think that the world or the sciences would ever have suggested to me any philosophical problems. What has suggested philosophical problems to me is things which other philosophers have said about the world or the sciences. (G.E. Moore, 1942, p. 14).
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  46.  5
    James H. Fetzer (1994). Creative Thinking Presupposes the Capacity for Thought. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):539-540.
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  47. Andrea Bianchi (2007). Speaking and Thinking (Or: AMoreKaplanian Wayto aUnified Account of Language and Thought). In Carlo Penco, Michael Beaney & Massimiliano Vignolo (eds.), Explaining the Mental: Naturalist and Non-Naturalist Approaches to Mental Acts and Processes. Cambridge Scholars Pub. 13.
     
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  48.  7
    Jose Luis Orozco (1974). Two Ways of Thinking on Political Thought. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):161-173.
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  49.  4
    C. Agulanna (2011). Eschatological Thinking and the Notion of the Afterlife in African Thought System. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 11 (1).
  50.  40
    Peter King, Thinking About Things: Singular Thought in the Middle Ages.
    In one corner Socrates; in the other, on the mat, his cat Felix. Socrates, of course, thinks (correctly) that Felix the Cat is on the mat. But there’s the rub. For Socrates to think that Felix is on the mat, he has to be able to think about Felix, that is, he has to have some sort of cognitive grasp of an individual — and not just any individual, but Felix himself. How is that possible? What is going on when (...)
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