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  1. Tibor R. Machan, 23. “A Priori: A Brief Critical Survey”.
    The issue of whether logic has an ontological base—rests, ultimately, on the principles or nature of reality—is constantly with us. In this paper I revisit it, drawing on a piece I wrote back in 1969, for the early incarnation of Reason magazine. I conclude that the Aristotelian idea that logic [...].
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  2. Tibor R. Machan, 42. “Backing the Founders: The Case for Unalienable Individual Rights”.
    Many may benefit from revisiting the natural rights support for the fully free society even though the case is on record in several books and numerous scholarly pieces. Here I provide a sketch of that support, with a plethora of references for those who would like to explore the full [...].
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  3. Tibor R. Machan, “Discussion Note: Contemporary Philosophy Versus the Free Society”.
    Some libertarians are impatient with philosophical discussions and even dismiss philosophy as not needed to make the case for the free society. I dispute this and indicate why. As many have found, even to dismiss philosophy, one needs a bit of it!
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  4. Tibor R. Machan, 8. “Truth in Philosophy”.
    Can there be truth in philosophy? A problem: it is philosophy, its various schools, that advances what counts as true versus false, how to go about making the distinction. This is what I wish to focus on here and see if some coherent, sensible position could be reached on the [...].
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  5. Tibor R. Machan, No Taxation with or Without Representation: Completing the Revolutionary Break with Feudalist Practices.
    Taxation is a vestige of feudalism and monarchy. It persists because of the mistaken belief that government is somehow entitled to a portion of our labor or assets. This article challenges that belief from a philosophical perspective and offers a different viewpoint.
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  6. Tibor R. Machan (forthcoming). Book Review: James M. Buchanan, Why I, Too, Am Not a Conservative. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  7. Tibor R. Machan (forthcoming). Human Rights, Workers' Rights, and the “Right” to Occupational Safety. Moral Rights in the Workplace, Albany, Ny: State University of New York Press, as Reprinted in White, Ti (1993). Business Ethics: A Philosophical Reader. New York: Macmillan.
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  8. Tibor R. Machan (2013). Business and Liberty: An Ethical Union. In. In Christopher Luetege (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Springer. 1205--1222.
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  9. Tibor R. Machan (2013). Two Flaws in Anti-Market Criticisms. Think 12 (35):95-99.
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  10. Rainer Ebert & Tibor R. Machan (2012). Innocent Threats and the Moral Problem of Carnivorous Animals. Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (2):146-159.
    The existence of predatory animals is a problem in animal ethics that is often not taken as seriously as it should be. We show that it reveals a weakness in Tom Regan's theory of animal rights that also becomes apparent in his treatment of innocent human threats. We show that there are cases in which Regan's justice-prevails-approach to morality implies a duty not to assist the jeopardized, contrary to his own moral beliefs. While a modified account of animal rights that (...)
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  11. Tibor R. Machan (2012). Doubting One's Mind. Analysis and Metaphysics 11:11-13.
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  12. Tibor R. Machan (2012). Drug Prohibition is Both Wrong and Unworkable. Think 11 (30):85-92.
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  13. Tibor R. Machan (2011). A Critique of Positive Rights. In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge. 110.
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  14. Tibor R. Machan (2011). Why is Everyone Else Wrong?: Explorations in Truth and Reason. Springer.
    In this provocative monograph, Tibor Machan explores the principles of truth, reason, and ideology, with particular respect to the profound political, economic, ...
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  15. Tibor R. Machan (2010). Did Socrates Know Nothing? Think 9 (25):85-87.
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  16. Tibor R. Machan (2010). Some Contrarian Reflections on Advertising. Think 9 (24):47-50.
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  17. Tibor R. Machan (2009). Self-Ownership and the Lockean Proviso. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (1):93-98.
    Locke's defense of private property rights includes what is called a proviso— "the Lockean proviso"—and some have argued that in terms of it the right to private property can have various exceptions and it may not even be unjust to redistribute wealth that is privately owned. I argue that this cannot be right because it would imply that one's right to life could also have various exceptions, so anyone's life (and labor) could be subject to conscription if some would need (...)
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  18. Tibor R. Machan (2009). What Rights Do We Have? Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (4):469-477.
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  19. Tibor R. Machan (2008). Rand on Hume's Moral Skepticism. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 9 (2):245 - 251.
    This brief discussion argues that Ayn Rand misconstrued David Hume's famous "is/ought" gap, just as innumerable others have. Hume objected to deducing ought claims (or judgments or statements) from is claims and not to deriving the former from the latter. He was silent about this but his own work in ethics and politics suggests that he would agree that one can infer ethical, moral or political beliefs from an understanding of facts (such as those of history).
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  20. Tibor R. Machan (2008). The Promise of Liberty: A Non-Utopian Vision. Lexington Books.
    Introduction: Why moral judgments can be objective -- Theorists v. their theories : the case of agent causation -- Ethics and its controversial assumptions : individualism & human success -- Virtue, liberty, and private property : aspects of humanist political economy -- Economic analysis and the pursuit of liberty -- Human rights and poverty -- Rights, values, regulation, and health care -- The morality of smoking -- Philosophy, physics, and common sense -- The calculation problem & the tragedy of the (...)
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  21. Tibor R. Machan (2008). Why Moral Judgments Can Be Objective. Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):100-125.
    Are we able to make objective moral judgments? This perennial philosophical topic needs often to be revisited because it is central to human life. Judging how people conduct themselves, the institutions they devise, whether, in short, they are doing what's right or what's wrong, is ubiquitous. In this essay I defend the objectivity of ethical judgments by deploying a neo-Aristotelian naturalism by which to keep the gap at bay and place morality on an objective footing. I do this with the (...)
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  22. Tibor R. Machan (2007). A Brief Comment on Hartford. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 8 (2).
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  23. Tibor R. Machan (2007). Altruism (Stakeholder Theory) Versus Business Ethics. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:453-456.
    Stakeholder theory is now nearly mainstream among business ethics and business and society scholars but it has serious problems. One is well communicated by a quote from W. H. Auden: "We are here on earth to do good for others. What the others are here for, I don't know." More to the point, stakeholder theory violates private property rights and freedom of association. It makes of people in business involuntary servants of "society," mainly of self-appointed moralists. This paper explores stakeholder (...)
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  24. Tibor R. Machan (2007). Defining Government, Begging the Question: An Answer to Walter Block's Reply. Journal of Libertarian Studies 21 (1):91-99.
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  25. Tibor R. Machan (2007). Good God, Bad Deeds? Think 5 (15):55-58.
    Tibor Machan responds to James Franklin's response to the problem of evil (in Think issue 5).
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  26. Tibor R. Machan (2007). Rejoinder to Robert Hartford, "Objectivity and the Proof of Egoism" (Spring 2007): A Brief Comment on Hartford. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 8 (2):305 - 306.
    In response to Robert Hartford's criticisms of his Spring 2006 Journal of Ayn Rand Studies essay, "Rand and Choice," Machan reiterates the main point: Prior to the choice to live/think, a human being cannot be aware of any principle of ethics. So the choice to live/think cannot rest on such a principle. Only once that choice has been made—however incrementally, gradually, by fits and starts—can one be rationally expected to live a principled life.
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  27. Tibor R. Machan (2007). The Morality of Business: A Profession for Human Wealthcare. Springer.
    Government interference in free enterprise is growing. Should they intercede in business ethics and corporate responsibility; and if so, to what extent? The Morality of Business: A Profession for Human Wealthcare goes beyond the utilitarian case in discussing the various elements of business ethics, social policy, job security, outsourcing, government regulation, stakeholder theory, advertising and property rights. "Professor Machan has done it again! Profit seeking behavior by business is ethical and prudent, but it only can be ethical when a person (...)
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  28. Tibor R. Machan (ed.) (2006). Ayn Rand at 100. Distributed by D.K. Publishers Distributors.
  29. Tibor R. Machan (2006). Is Free Will Real? Think 4 (12):61-64.
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  30. Tibor R. Machan (2006). Rand and Choice. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 7 (2).
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  31. Tibor R. Machan (2006). Reply to Douglas B. Rasmussen, "Rand on Obligation and Value" (Fall 2002) and Eric Mack, "Problematic Arguments in Randian Ethics" (Fall 2003): Rand and Choice. [REVIEW] Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 7 (2):257 - 273.
    Rand's metaethical objectivism consists not in the view that values lie outside of us—in an independent reality such that we can identify them or fail to do so. Rather, Rand's conception of "objectivity" regarding the foundation of ethics is what is often called "agent-relative" but not subjective. Or, as Rand states, ethical claims are "objectively conditional" (in her essay "Causality versus Duty"). In elaborating this perspective, Machan shows that it suffices to avoid the dreaded charge of subjectivism contained in both (...)
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  32. Tibor R. Machan (2006). Rights, Values, Regulation, and Health Care. Journal of Value (2006) 40 (2-3):155ff.
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  33. Tibor R. Machan (2006). The Pseudo-Science of B. F. Skinner. University Press of America.
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  34. Walter Block, Samuel Bostaph, Ricardo F. Crespo, Jeffrey M. Herbener, Richard C. B. Johnsson, Tibor R. Machan, Douglas B. Rasmussen, Murray N. Rothbard, Chris Matthew Sciabarra, Larry J. Sechrest, Barry Smith & Gloria Zúñiga (2005). Philosophers of Capitalism: Menger, Mises, Rand, and Beyond. Lexington Books.
     
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  35. Craig Duncan, Tibor R. Machan & Martha Nussbaum (2005). Libertarianism: For and Against. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  36. Tibor R. Machan (2005). Can Commerce Inspire? In Nicholas Capaldi (ed.), Business and Religion: A Clash of Civilizations? M & M Scrivener Press. 16.
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  37. Tibor R. Machan (2004). Aristotle and the Moral Status of Business. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (2):203-223.
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  38. Tibor R. Machan (2004). A Brief Defense of Free Will. In John R. Burr & Milton Goldinger (eds.), Philosophy and Contemporary Issues. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
     
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  39. Tibor R. Machan (2004). The Man Without a Hobby: Adventures of a Gregarious Egoist. Hamilton Books.
    The Man Without a Hobby is the memoir of Tibor Machan, a first generation refugee who escaped both a political and a personal tyranny early in his life and embarked upon a search for an understanding of what it means to live freely and ...
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  40. Tibor R. Machan (2003). Government Regulation Vs. The Free Society. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 22 (1):77-83.
  41. Tibor R. Machan (2003). Objectivity: Recovering Determinate Reality in Philosophy, Science, and Everyday Life. Ashgate.
    This book considers and responds to these and similar challenges to objectivity.
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  42. Tibor R. Machan (2003). Libertarianism in One Easy Lesson. The Philosophers' Magazine 23 (23):46-49.
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  43. Tibor R. Machan (2002). Free Will Reconsidered. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 4 (1).
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  44. Tibor R. Machan (2002). Reply to William Dwyer: Free Will Reconsidered. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 4 (1):215 - 220.
    Tibor R. Machan argues that William Dwyer's review of his book, Initiative: Human Agency and S odety (The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, Fall 2001), assumes that compatibilism is coherent. Machan argues that compatibilism is simply hard determinism with some soft edges but as such it is not coherent. In light of this, the agent-causation-based thesis of human initiative (or freedom of the human will) that Machan defends is superior to its alternatives.
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  45. Tibor R. Machan (2002). Why Human Beings May Use Animals. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (1):9-16.
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  46. Tibor R. Machan (2002). Your Country Needs... Your Liver? The Philosophers' Magazine 18 (18):19-20.
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  47. Thomas Magnell, Moving Away From A. Local, Tibor R. Machan, Kevin Graham, Sharon Sytsma, Agape Sans Dieu, Jonathan Glover, Harry G. Frankfurt, James Stacey Taylor & Peter Singer (2002). Information for Contributors. Journal of Value Inquiry 36:601-603.
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  48. Jonathan Westphal, Laurence Hitterdale, Steven M. Cahn, Marcus Verhaegh, Christopher W. Stevens, Tibor R. Machan & Steven Yates (2002). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 75 (5):173 - 182.
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  49. Tibor R. Machan (2001). Another Look at Abortion. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 2 (2).
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  50. Tibor R. Machan (2001). Libertarian Justice. In James P. Sterba (ed.), Social and Political Philosophy: Contemporary Perspectives. Routledge. 93--114.
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